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L  I  B  RAFLY 

OF  THL 

UN  IVERSITY 

or    ILLl  NOIS 

2>©\ 
C433K 
V-    ^.-3 


iiumnsHismicttsaiiyn 


HISTORY 


OF  THE 


BOARD  OF  TRADE 


OF  THE 


CITY  OF  CHICAGO 


EDITED  BY 

CHARLES  H.  TAYLOR 


7A^  THREE  VOLUMES 

Illustrated 


VOLUME  III 


CHICAGO 

ROBERT  O.  LAW  COMPANY 

1917  , 


PRINTED    AND    BOUND    BY 
ROBERT  0.    LAW    COMPANY 


-^^i  in    ft. 

A  3 


INDEX 

Personal  sketches  in  this  volume  are  arranged  in  alpha- 
betical order,  thus  making  an  index  of  them  unnecessary. 
A  list  of  those  whose  portraits  appear  is  as  follows : 

PORTRAITS 

PAGE 

Adams,  Cyrus  H 12 

Andrew,   Edward 15 

Badenoch,  John  J 27 

Bailey,  Edward  W 28 

Baker,  Alfred  L 31 

Brennan,  Bernard  G 49 

Brennan,  Patrick 50 

Brosseau,  Zenophile  P 54 

Brown,  George  D 57 

Chandler,  Reuben  G 68 

Conley,  Morton  L 74 

Crighton,   James 80 

Cross,  Albert  E 83 

Day,  Winfield  S 91 

Delaney,  Frank  J 93 

Dickinson,  Albert 96 

Dickinson,   William loi 

Edwards,  James  A no 

Griffin,  Joseph  P 137 

Grier,  Thomas  A 139 

Hampe,  William  W 143 

Hancock,  John  L 144 

Hill,  John  Jr 154 

Hudson,  William  E 1 59 

Hulburd,  Charles  H 162 

Jackson,  William  S 172 

Keelin,  Thomas  W 176 

Kemper,  Albert  J 177 

Kempner,  Adolph 178 

Kettles,  Robert  P 180 

KiDSTON,  James 182 

5 


PORTRAITS 

PAGE 

Lake,  William  H 187 

Lamson,  Lorenzo  J 188 

LiCHTENBERGER,  ChARLES,  Jr I98 

Lichtenberger,  Christian 199 

Linn,  William  R 200 

Logan,  Frank  G 202 

Maltby,  Ernest  V 211 

McDougall,  Alexander 219 

Merrill,  J.  Charles  F. 225 

Montelius,  George  D 229 

Mueller,  Carl  B 235 

Noyes,  David  A 244 

Pringle,  Robert   262 

Rang,  Henry,  Jr 266 

Roberts,   John 274 

Rogers,  Henry  W 277 

RosENBAUM,  Joseph 279 

RuMSEY,  Israel  P 281 

Sager,  Hiram  N 287 

Simons,  Joseph 296 

SOUTHWORTH,  EzRA  L 307 

Steever,  Jerome  G 309 

Stream,  John  J 312 

Stuart,  Robert  313 

Sturtevant,  Henry  D 314 

Swift,  Theodore  W 315 

Taylor,  Charles  H 317 

Wagner,  Emil  W 325 

Ware,  J.   Herbert 328 

Warren,  William  S 330 

White,  A.  Stamford 335 

Wilkins,  John  H 339 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


Biographical 


Frank  C.  Abbey. — The  vigorous  and  progressive  little  city  of 
Monmouth,  Warren  county,  Illinois,  claims  Mr.  Abbey  as  one  of 
its  business  men  and  as  one  of  the  influential  exponents  of  the  com- 
mission trade  in  grain,  provisions,  cotton  and  stocks  in  central  Illi- 
nois, his  membership  in  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago 
dating  from  April  15,  1914.  His  initial  experience  in  connection 
with  the  practical  affairs  of  life  was  gained  through  the  assistance 
which  he  early  began  to  give  in  the  work  of  his  father's  farm  in 
Illinois,  and  he  thus  continued  his  active  association  with  the  funda- 
mental industry  of  agriculture  until  1910,  his  educational  advan- 
tages in  the  meanwhile  having  been  those  of  the  public  schools. 
In  that  year  he  became  active  manager  of  the  grain  business  of  H.  E. 
Whitler,  and  after  retaining  this  position  three  years  he  became  a 
representative  of  the  well  known  Chicago  grain  firm  of  Lamson 
Brothers  &  Company.  With  this  concern  he  remained  until  April, 
1916,  when  he  established  his  present  independent  commission  busi- 
ness at  Monmouth,  a  city  which  has  been  his  home  since  1914. 
Mr.  Abbey  is  a  Republican  in  politics,  is  a  loyal  and  progressive 
citizen,  even  as  he  is  a  wide-awake  business  man,  and  he  is  affiliated 
with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Tribe  of  Ben  Hur.  He  has 
been  retained  as  a  correspondent  for  not  only  Lamson  Brothers  & 
Company,  of  Chicago,  but  also  for  Ware  &  Leland,  another  promi- 
nent Chicago  commission  concern,  but  he  has  severed  his  alliances 
in  these  connections.  Mr.  Abbey  was  born  and  reared  in  Illinois, 
the  date  of  his  nativity  having  been  November  13,  1874.  He  is  a 
son  of  Henry  M.  and  Margaret  (Clark)  Abbey,  his  father  having 
been  a  native  of  the  state  of  New  York  and  having  become  one  of 
the  successful  farmers  and  honored  and  influential  citizens  of  his 
county.     His  death  occurred  in  July,  1912. 

Hugh  Adams. — It  is  essentially  within  the  province  of  this  pub- 
lication to  pay  special  tribute  of  deference  and  honor  to  those  ster- 
ling men  who  figured  as  pioneer  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  the  City  of  Chicago  and  who  otherwise  played  large  and  influ- 
ential parts  in  the  intense  drama  of  civic  and  material  progress  that 
brought  about  the  development  of  the  great  metropolis  of  the  West. 
The  real  prizes  of  existence  continue  to  go,  as  they  have  always 
gone,  to  those  who  do  their  work  conscientiously,  who  adjust  them- 
selves wisely  to  conditions  and  events,  who  love  in  loyalty,  who 
are  true  in  personal  stewardship  and  who  live  in  wise  and  cheer- 
ful optimism.    One  of  the  honored  pioneers  of  the  Board  of  Trade 

9 


HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

was  the  late  Hugh  Adams,  whose  life  was  full  and  strong,  who  de- 
veloped a  great  soul  and  noble  character  and  who  gathered  a  host 
of  real  friends,  besides  which  he  achieved  material  success  of  en- 
during and  worthy  order  and  left  a  quiet  but  benignant  impress 
upon  the  history  of  the  city  in  which  his  interests  and  activities 
were  long  centered.  A  scion  of  one  of  the  patrician  old  colonial 
families  of  America,  he  well  upheld  the  prestige  of  the  name  which 
he  bore,  and  in  his  long  and  useful  life  he  poured  true  values  into 
the  crucible  that  tries  the  gold  of  humanity.  Mr.  Adams  repre- 
sented a  distinct  and  potent  force  in  the  development  and  upbuild- 
ing of  the  grain  trade  in  Chicago,  and  may  well  be  classified  among 
the  leaders  in  the  initial  movements  that  brought  eventual  pre- 
eminence to  the  city  in  connection  with  this  all-important  line  of 
industrial  enterprise  that  touches  the  very  vital  life  of  the  nation, 
of  all  nations.  The  significance  of  the  characteristic  influence  ex- 
erted by  Hugh  Adams  in  connection  with  the  early  operations  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  is  measurably  indicated  in  the  resolutions  that 
were  adopted  by  that  body  at  the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred 
on  the  10th  of  March,  1880,  and  the  context  of  these  resolutions 
properly  find  perpetuation  in  this  memoir:  "Whereas,  It  has 
pleased  the  Divine  Providence  to  remove  suddenly  from  our 
midst,  by  death,  Mr.  Hugh  Adams,  for  over  twenty  years  a 
member  and  formerly  a  Director  of  the  Board;  therefore.  Re- 
solved, That  in  the  decease  of  Mr.  Adams  we  recognize  the  loss 
of  one  of  the  oldest  and  most  valued  members  of  our  Association, 
and  one  who,  by  his  unswerving  integrity  as  a  merchant  and  by 
his  genial  disposition  and  pleasant  demeanor,  endeared  his  mem- 
ory to  us  in  no  ordinary  measure."  Hugh  Adams  was  born  in 
Rockbridge  County,  Virginia,  on  the  10th  of  February,  1820,  and 
thus  his  death  occurred  exactly  one  month  after  he  had  celebrated 
the  sixtieth  anniversary  of  his  birth.  He  was  a  son  of  James  and 
Sarah  Adams,  and  a  grandson  of  John  Adams,  who  was  a  son  of 
John  Adams  St.,  the  founder  of  the  family  in  Rockbridge  County, 
Virginia,  where  his  stately  old  home,  at  Timber  Ridge,  was  a 
center  of  the  courtly  and  dignified  hospitality  that  characterized 
the  fine  old  Southern  regime.  The  Virginia  or  Southern  branch 
of  the  Adams  family,  as  taken  in  contradistinction  to  the  historic 
family  of  the  same  name  in  New  England,  found  as  its  original 
American  progenitor  Robert  Adams,  whose  ancestors  were  allied 
with  the  nobility  of  England  and  whose  descendants  took  rank 
among  the  patrician  first  families  of  the  historic  Old  Dominion, 
Virginia.  The  following  quotation  bears  its  own  significance  and 
authority.  "This  branch  of  the  Adams  family  has  produced  many 
distinguished  Americans,  including  statesmen,  soldiers  in  three 
American  wars,  professional  and  business  men."  John  Adams  Jr., 
of  Rockbridge  Baths,  son  of  John  Adams,  of  Timber  Ridge,  first 
wedded  Jane  Hutcheson,  who  was  of  Scottish  ancestry,  and  after 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  11 

her  death  he  married  Margaret  Mcllhenny.  There  were  eight 
children  by  the  first  marriage,  and  their  descendants  are  now  scat- 
tered largely  thpough  the  southern  and  western  states.  The  eldest 
son,  James,  married  Sarah  McCroskey,  and  their  fourth  son  was 
he  to  whom  this  memoir  is  dedicated.  Hugh  Adams  was  reared 
under  the  benign  conditions  of  the  ancient  regime  in  historic  old 
Virginia,  and  was  afforded  excellent  educational  advantages;  the 
while  he  became  thoroughly  imbued  with  those  sterling  principles 
and  fine  social  qualities  that  significantly  marked  the  Virginia  gen- 
tleman of  the  "old  school."  Though  he  never  failed  in  his  appre- 
ciation of  the  patriarchal  attractions  of  the  fine  old  commonwealth 
in  which  he  was  born  and  reared,  the  vigorous  spirit  of  Mr.  Adams 
led  him  to  seek  a  wider  field  of  endeavor,  though  he  had  become  a 
prosperous  merchant  in  Virginia.  Germane  to  the  sentiments  and 
progressiveness  which  finally  led  to  his  establishing  his  residence 
in  Chicago  are  the  following  statements  from  a  previously  pub- 
lished review  of  his  career:  "Hugh  Adams  came  of  that  stock 
which  produces  pioneers,  and  in  1857  he  sought  a  wider  horizon 
by  removing  with  his  family  to  Chicago,  which  was  then  little  more 
than  a  village.  It  took  an  optimistic  spirit  to  have  even  obscure 
prescience  of  the  magnificent  future  in  store  for  the  Illinois  set- 
tlement at  the  foot  of  Lake  Michigan,  but  Mr.  Adams  was  a  man 
who  looked  beneath  the  surface  of  things,  and  measured  possibil- 
ities by  other  standards  than  those  required  for  small  undertak- 
ings. In  1859  he  founded  the  grain  commission  house  that  has 
had  a  virtually  continuous  history  to  the  present  time  and  that 
is  still  operated  by  members  of  his  family.  He  became  one  of  the 
first  members  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  with  which  he 
continued  to  be  connected  until  his  death."  It  may  further  be 
noted  that  in  establishing  himself  in  the  grain  commission  trade, 
in  1859,  as  noted  above,  Mr.  Adams  became  associated  with  his 
brother-in-law,  the  late  Cyrus  H.  McCormick,  who  later  attained 
to  world-wide  fame  as  one  of  America's  great  captains  of  industry, 
and  founded  the  commission  firm  of  Cyrus  H.  McCormick  &  Co. 
Later  the  firm  name  of  McCormick,  Adams  &  Co.  was  adopted, 
and  at  this  juncture  Mr.  Adams'  son,  Cyrus  H.  became  one  of 
the  interested  principals.  Still  later  this  son  became  the  head  of 
the  firm  of  Cyrus  H.  Adams  &  Co.,  which  continued  the  busi- 
ness, in  which  his  two  younger  brothers  became  associated,  and 
from  that  time  forward  the  enterprise  was  conducted  under  the 
title  last  noted  until  Cyrus  H.  Adams  retired  from  active  busi- 
ness, after  having  been  thus  concerned  in  the  development  of  one 
of  the  strongest  and  most  important  grain  houses  of  the  western 
metropolis.  There  has  been  to  this  representative  Chicago  house 
a  consecutive  history  and  the  extensive  business,  with  far-reach- 
ing ramifications,  is  now  conducted  under  the  title  of  Edward  S. 
Adams  &  Co.,  the  executive  head  of  the  firm  being  a  son  of  the 


12  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

subject  of  this  memoir  and  being  accorded  individual  mention  on 
other  pages  of  this  publication.  Similar  representation  is  given 
also  to  the  older  son,  Cyrus  H.  Adams,  who  is  now  living  vir- 
tually retired  and  who  is  still  one  of  the  loyal  and  public-spirited 
citizens  of  Chicago.  The  entire  course  of  the  life  of  Hugh  Adams 
was  guided  and  governed  by  the  loftiest  of  principles,  and  he  was 
honored  by  all  who  knew  him.  He  was  an  earnest  and  conscien- 
tious member  of  the  Presbyterian  Church,  and  upon  coming  to 
Chicago  he  enrolled  as  a  member  of  the  old  North  Presbyterian 
Church,  now  known  as  the  Fourth  Presbyterian,  with  the  services 
and  support  of  which  he  continued  his  active  and  zealous  associa- 
tion until  the  close  of  his  life,  his  wife  likewise  having  been  a 
devoted  member.  On  the  8th  of  May,  1845,  was  solemnized  the 
marriage  of  Mr.  Adams  to  Miss  Amanda  Johanna  McCormick,  a 
daughter  of  Robert  McCormick,  a  prominent  agriculturist  and 
inventor  of  Rockbridge  County,  Virginia,  and  ancestor  of  the  in- 
fluential McCormick  family  of  Illinois,  whose  name  has  become 
famous  in  connection  with  the  invention  and  manufacturing  of 
harvesting  machinery.  Mrs.  Adams  survived  her  honored  hus- 
band and  was  summoned  to  eternal  rest  in  1891,  when  about 
sixty-eight  years  of  age.  They  became  the  parents  of  eight  chil- 
dren, namely;  Mary  Caroline,  Robert  McCormick,  Cyrus  Hall, 
James  William,  Sarah  Ella,  Hugh  Leander,  Edward  Shields,  and 
Amanda  Virginia.  All  of  these  children  married  and  reared  chil- 
dren and  all  are  still  living,  in  1916,  except  Sarah  Ella  and  Hugh 
Leander.  As  previously  stated,  Cyrus  H.  and  Edward  S.  are 
individually  represented  in  this  publication. 

Cyrus  H.  Adams. — A  resident  of  Chicago  since  his  boyhood, 
Cyrus  Hall  Adams  has  well  upheld  the  prestige  of  a  family  name 
that  has  been  signally  honored  in  the  history  of  the  city  and  has 
marked  by  distinctive  personal  achievement  a  place  of  his  own  in 
connection  with  economic,  industrial,  commercial  and  civic  affairs 
in  the  fine  metropolis  that  rears  itself  proudly  and  gallantly  on 
the  shores  of  Lake  Michigan.  His  father,  the  late  Hugh  Adams, 
to  whom  a  memoir  is  dedicated  on  other  pages  of  this  work,  was 
one  of  the  pioneer  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  an  influ- 
ential factor  in  connection  with  operations  in  the  grain  trade  in 
Chicago.  He  whose  name  initiates  this  article  became  a  member 
of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  in  1870,  and  until  his  retirement 
from  active  business,  in  1889,  he  was  one  of  its  most  loyal,  re- 
sourceful and  influential  representatives,  besides  having  been  at 
the  head  of  the  extensive  grain  commission  business  of  which  his 
father  had  been  one  of  the  founders.  By  reference  to  the  review 
of  the  career  of  Hugh  Adams,  elsewhere  in  this  work,  adequate 
information  may  be  gained  concerning  the  family  history  and  the 
earlier  association  of  the  family  name  with  the  affairs  of  the 
grain  trade  and  Board  of  Trade  in  Chicago.     Cyrus  Hall  Adams 


At^«-^  , 


AAy/ 


ft 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  13 

takes  justifiable  pride  in  adverting  to  the  historic  Old  Dominion 
State  as  the  place  of  his  nativity  and  also  in  being  a  scion  of  two 
distinguished  lines  of  American  ancestry — that  represented  in  his 
patronymic  and  that  designating  the  lineage  of  his  mother,  who 
was  a  member  of  the  McCormick  family,  whose  name  has  become 
known  to  the  entire  civilized  world  in  connection  with  the  inven- 
tion and  manufacture  of  harvesting  machinery.  He  was  born  at 
Kerr's  Creek,  Rockbridge  County,  Virginia,  on  the  21st  of  Feb- 
ruary, 1849,  and  is  a  son  of  Hugh  and  Amanda  J.  (McCormick) 
Adams.  He  was  a  lad  of  eight  years  at  the  time  of  the  family 
removal  to  Chicago,  in  1857,  and  in  this  city  he  attended  the  pub- 
lic schools  until  he  became  eligible  for  matriculation  in  the  old 
Chicago  University.  After  a  course  in  this  institution  Mr.  Adams 
became  associated  with  the  substantial  grain  business  of  the  firm 
of  Cyrus  H.  McCormick  &  Co.,  of  which  his  father  and  maternal 
uncle  were  the  constituent  members.  This  initiation  of  his  busi- 
ness career  was  in  1867,  and  in  1871  he  was  admitted  to  partnership 
in  the  firm,  the  title  of  which  was  thereupon  changed  to  McCor- 
mick, Adams  &  Co.  He  developed  great  discretion  and  ability  in 
connection  with  the  operations  of  the  firm  and  eventually  became 
its  executive  head,  when  two  of  his  younger  brothers,  Hugh  Lean- 
der  and  Edward  Shields  Adams,  were  admitted  to  partnership. 
At  this  juncture  in  the  history  of  this  old  and  influential  grain 
business  the  firm  title  of  Cyrus  H.  Adams  &  Co.  was  adopted,  and 
its  titular  head,  Cyrus  H.  Adams,  continued  the  incumbent  of  this 
position  until  his  retirement  from  active  business,  in  1889.  Con- 
cerning his  association  with  the  Board  of  Trade,  the  following  per- 
tinent statements   have  been   written : 

"Becoming  enrolled  on  the  roster  of  the  Board  of  Trade  in 
1870,  Mr.  Adams  soon  became  one  of  its  most  forceful  and  influ- 
ential members.  From  1871  until  1889  he  was  retained  in  consec- 
utive official  service  as  a  member  of  the  Arbitration  Committee, 
the  Committee  of  Appeals  and  Board  of  Directors.  In  1882  he 
was  tendered  the  presidency  of  the  Board,  but  impaired  health 
compelled  him  to  decline  this  honor.  He  was  largely  instrumental 
in  formulating  and  putting  into  eflfective  utilization  the  official 
'Rules  and  Regulations'  of  the  Board,  and  to  him  belongs  the 
greater  measure  of  credit  of  devising  and  establishing  its  clearing 
house  and  delivery  system,  which  almost  revolutionized  its  poli- 
cies and  methods  and  aided  greatly  in  making  Chicago  a  center 
for  the  grain  and  provision  trade.  With  failing  health,  however, 
Mr.  Adams  realized  that  he  must  relax  his  hold  upon  active  busi- 
ness affairs,  and  in  1889  he  retired,  although  nothing  will  ever 
cause  him  to  lose  his  interest  in  the  vital  matters  of  life  or  in  the 
welfare  of  the  city  which  has  long  represented  his  home." 

With  naught  of  ostentation  but  with  a  fine  sense  of  stewards- 
ship  and  appreciation,   Mr.  Adams  has  entered  fully  and  loyally 


14  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

into  the  civic  life  of  Chicago  and  stood  exponent  of  high  ideals  of 
citizenship.  His  influence  has  extended  in  many  directions  and 
in  ever  widening  angle  of  beneficence.  For  years  he  has  served  as 
a  trustee  of  the  McCormick  Theological  Seminary  and  the  Eliza- 
beth McCormick  Memorial  Fund,  his  interest  in  which  is  enhanced 
by  family  relationship,  and  equally  zealous  has  been  his  service  as 
a  member  of  the  governing  board  of  the  Art  Institute  of  Chicago 
and  that  of  the  Presbyterian  Hospital.  He  was  for  a  protracted 
period  a  member  of  the  directorate  of  the  National  Bank  of  Amer- 
ica, is  a  loyal  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the  Democratic  party,  though 
never  a  seeker  of  public  office,  and  both  he  and  his  wife  are  zealous 
members  of  the  Presbyterian  Church,  their  beautiful  home  being 
situated  at  711  Rush  street,  Chicago,  and  being  known  for  its 
gracious  hospitality.  Though  he  is  practically  retired  from  busi- 
ness, Mr.  Adams  finds  ample  demand  upon  his  time  and  attention 
in  the  supervision  of  his  private  capitalistic  investments  and  affairs 
and  maintains  an  office  at  208  South  La  Salle  street.  He  formerly 
held  membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club,  and  his  name  is 
still  enrolled  as  a  valued  member  of  the  Union  League,  the  On- 
wentsia  and  the  Saddle  &  Cycle  Clubs.  September  26,  1878,  re- 
corded the  marriage  of  Mr.  Adams  to  Miss  Emma  Josephine  Blair, 
daughter  of  the  late  Lyman  Blair,  an  honored  and  influential  citizen 
of  Chicago,  and  the  only  child  of  this  union  is  Cyrus  Hall  Adams  Jr. 
The  son  was  graduated  in  Princeton  University  with  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts  and  later  received  from  the  law  school  of  North- 
western University  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws.  He  is  now 
engaged  in  the  successful  practice  of  his  profession  in  Chicago  and 
has  secure  vantage  place  as  one  of  the  representative  younger 
members  of  the  bar  of  his  native  city. 

Edward  S.  Adams. — To  Edward  Shields  Adams  has  been  given 
the  privilege  and  distinction  of  maintaining  effectively  the  prestige 
and  influence  of  a  name  that  has  been  prominently  concerned  with 
the  activities  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  the  early  pioneer  epoch 
in  its  history  and  to  figure  as  head  of  the  large  and  important  grain 
commission  business  that  was  founded  nearly  sixty  years  ago  by 
his  father  and  his  maternal  uncle,  Cyrus  H.  McCormick.  To  his 
honored  father,  the  late  Hugh  Adams,  an  individual  tribute  is  paid 
on  other  pages  of  this  publication,  and  within  these  volumes  ap- 
pears also  a  brief  review  of  the  career  of  his  brother,  Cyrus  H. 
Adams,  who  was  formerly  an  influential  and  active  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  and  by  virtue  of  such  records  it  is  not  incumbent 
in  the  present  article  to  offer  further  data  concerning  the  family 
history,  as  ready  reference  may  be  made  to  the  two  reviews  men- 
tioned. Edward  S.  Adams  senior  partner  of  the  grain  commission 
firm  of  Edward  S.  Adams  &  Co.,  with  offices  at  208  South  La  Salle 
street,  was  born  in  Chicago,  on  the  12th  of  December,  1859,  and  is 
a  son  of  Hugh  and  Amanda  J.  (McCormick)  Adams.     He  availed 


■M 


^ 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  IS 

himself  of  the  advantage  of  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  and 
then  took  a  collegiate  preparatory  course  in  the  English  and  class- 
ical school  at  West  Newton,  Massachusetts,  after  which  he  entered 
Cornell  University,  Ithaca,  New  York,  in  which  he  pursued  a 
course  in  history  and  political  science  until  1880,  when  the  death 
of  his  father  caused  him  to  return  home.  He  did  not  resume  his 
work  at  the  university  but  identified  himself  with  the  extensive 
brokerage  business  of  which  has  father  had  been  one  of  the  found- 
ers, under  the  title  of  Cyrus  H.  McCormick  &  Co.  He  has  liter- 
ally grown  up  in  the  grain  trade  and  is  now  one  of  its  prominent 
and  influential  exponents  in  his  native  city.  The  original  firm  was 
subjected  to  changes  in  constituency  and  title  in  the  passing  years, 
but  the  history  of  the  business  has  been  consecutive  and  admirable, 
the  final  change  in  name  having  come  when  Edward  S.  Adams,  of 
this  review,  became  head  of  the  business,  which  is  now  carried 
forward  under  the  title  of  Edward  S.  Adams  &  Co.  His  association 
with  this  representative  enterprise  has  continued  from  the  time 
of  the  initiation  of  his  business  career  to  the  present,  and  his  ad- 
vancement has  been  gained  through  ability  and  well-ordered  en- 
deavor. His  first  work  was  that  of  service  as  a  clerk  in  the  ofifice 
of  his  father  and  thereafter  he  was  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Cyrus 
H.  Adams  &  Co.,  in  line  of  direct  succession,  until  his  elder  brother, 
Cyrus  H.,  retired  from  active  business,  in  1889,  when  he  became 
one  of  the  interested  principals  and  senior  member  of  the  firm  of 
Adams  &  Samuel.  This  title  was  maintained  until  1910,  when  the 
present  firm  of  Edward  S.  Adams  &  Co.,  comprised  of  Edward  S. 
Adams  and  Robert  P.  Boylan,  was  formed.  Mr.  Adams'  member- 
ship in  the  Board  of  Trade  dates  from  the  year  1881,  and  in  his 
allegiance  to  and  activities  in  this  great  Chicago  commercial  organ- 
ization he  has  fully  lived  up  to  its  best  traditions  and  ideals.  He 
has  served  as  a  member  of  various  committees  on  the  Board  of 
Trade,  among  which  was  the  Arbitration  Committee,  1896-1898. 
He  was  elected  Second  Vice-President  of  the  Board  in  1902  and 
served  as  vice-president  in  1903.  In  addition  to  this,  Mr.  Adams 
was  for  several  years  a  director  of  the  Chicago  Stock  Exchange. 
In  politics  Mr.  Adams  clings  to  the  faith  in  which  he  was  reared 
and  is  affiliated  with  the  Democratic  party,  though  with  independent 
proclivities.  He  holds  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church,  and 
is  an  active  and  popular  member  of  the  University  Club,  Chicago 
Club,  Saddle  &  Cycle  Club  and  the  Onwentsia  Club ;  he  was  influ- 
ential in  the  organization  of  the  last  mentioned  and  served  as  the 
first  secretary. 

Edward  Andrew. — In  even  a  cursory  review  of  the  history 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  there  must  needs  be 
revealed  the  influence  of  many  dominating  personalities  that  have 
played  a  large  and  benignant  part  in  the  furtherance  of  its  opera- 
tions along  normal   and   legitimate   lines  and   in   the   directing  of 


16  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

its  affairs  with  circumspection  and  efficiency.  Such  relative  prom- 
inence must  be  granted  to  the  able  and  honored  member  whose 
name  initiates  this  paragraph  and  who  is  president  of  one  of  the 
old  and  important  grain  commission  firms  of  Chicago — the  Nash- 
Wright  Grain  Company.  Mr.  Andrew  has  stood  exponent  of  that 
vital  progressiveness  that  has  significantly  typified  the  great  me- 
tropolis of  the  West,  and  his  inviolable  place  in  the  confidence  and 
esteem  of  his  fellow  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  is  proclaimed 
in  the  fact  that  he  served  in  many  important  and  exacting  official 
positions,  including  that  of  president  of  this  dominant  commercial 
body,  in  the  affairs  of  which  he  has  shown  himself  a  loyal  and  in- 
fluential factor,  his  association  with  the  Board  having  had  its  in- 
ception almost  forty  years  ago  and  his  membership  in  the  same 
dating  from  1880.  His  official  service  in  connection  with  the  Board 
of  Trade  has  covered  a  period  of  thirteen  consecutive  years,  and 
this  fact  bears  its  own  significance.  Mr.  Andrew  was  born  at  North 
Tarrytown,  Westchester  County,  New  York,  on  the  9th  of  July, 
1858,  and  is  a  son  of  Matthew  F.  and  Sarah  A.  (Patterson)  Andrew, 
both  likewise  natives  of  the  Empire  State  and  representatives  of 
sterling  old  families  of  that  commonwealth.  Mr.  Andrew  was  a 
lad  of  seven  years  at  the  time  of  the  family  removal  to  the  city  of 
Newark,  New  Jersey,  where  he  was  reared  to  adult  age  and  where, 
after  completing  the  curriculum  of  the  public  schools,  he  fortified 
himself  by  a  course  in  a  business  college.  Alert,  vital  and  ambitious, 
Mr.  Andrew  was  moved  by  a  desire  to  identify  himself  with  the 
progressive  West,  and  in  October,  1877,  as  a  youth  of  nineteen 
years,  he  came  to  Chicago,  where  he  was  signally  favored  by  for- 
tuitous influences,  since  his  uncle,  the  late  David  H.  Baker,  who  was 
one  of  the  leading  grain  operators  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade 
at  that  early  period,  gave  him  a  place  in  his  commission  office,  which 
held  a  place  of  prominence  and  influence,  and  thus  the  young  East- 
erner almost  at  once  was  permitted  to  gain  association  with  the 
affairs  of  the  great  commercial  organization  in  which  he  was  des- 
tined to  rise  to  the  office  of  president.  In  1881  Mr.  Andrew  ac- 
quired a  partnership  interest  in  the  business  of  his  uncle,  and  at 
this  juncture  the  firm  name  of  Baker  &  Andrew  was  adopted.  In 
1889  Mr.  Baker  retired  from  active  business,  after  having  attained 
to  venerable  years,  and  thereafter  the  large  and  well-controlled 
grain  commission  business  was  continued  under  the  firm  name  of 
Edward  Andrew  &  Co.  until  1893,  when,  as  a  matter  of  commercial 
expediency  and  wisdom  in  meeting  the  demands  of  a  constantly 
expanding  business,  he  merged  his  interests  with  and  became  a 
member  of  the  Nash-Wright  Company.  This  arrangement  was 
continued  until  1910,  in  which  year  a  new  corporation,  the  Nash- 
Wright  Grain  Company,  was  organized  and  incorporated,  Mr.  An- 
drew having  been  its  executive  head  during  the  intervening  period 
of  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century  and  having  defined  its  policies 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  17 

with  characteristic  circumspection  and  efficiency.  Mr.  Andrew  has 
been  far  from  apathetic  in  his  association  with  the  Board  of  Trade 
and  by  his  earnest  and  zealous  influence  has  made  himself  prom- 
inent in  its  government  and  stable  advancement,  as  indicated  by 
his  many  years  of  service  in  official  capacity  and  by  the  frequent 
recourse  taken  to  his  judgment  in  connection  with  matters  of  su- 
preme importance.  He  has  devoted  much  time  and  attention  to 
formulating  and  carrying  forward  the  progressive  and  substantial 
policies  that  have  regulated  the  affairs  of  this  great  commercial 
body,  and  has  maintained  a  firm  hand  on  the  helm  of  its  destiny. 
In  January,  1905,  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  directorate  of  the 
Board,  and  a  similar  preferment  came  to  him  again  in  1908.  In 
1911  he  was  elected  Second  Vice-President,  and  in  the  following 
year  was  advanced  to  the  office  of  First  Vice-President,  from  which 
position  he  came  forth  as  the  normal  candidate  for  the  presidency, 
to  which  he  was  elected  in  1913  and  in  which  he  gave  a  most  able 
and  popular  administration.  Immediately  after  the  expiration  of 
his  term  as  President,  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  Committee 
of  Appeals,  and,  by  re-election  in  1916,  he  continues  his  membership 
on  this  important  committee.  In  addition  to  his  precedence  as  a 
member  of  the  representative  commission  house  of  the  Nash-Wrig^ht 
Grain  Company,  Mr.  Andrew  is  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the 
Ellis  Dryer  &  Elevator  Company,  and  as  a  citizen  and  man  of  af- 
fairs he  takes  a  deep  and  abiding  interest  in  all  that  touches  the 
civic  and  material  welfare  and  advancement  of  his  home  city.  In 
the  Masonic  fraternity  he  has  received  the  thirty-second  degree  of 
the  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  besides  having  completed  the 
circle  of  the  York  Rite  and  being  identified  also  with  the  adjunct 
organization,  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine.  He  holds  membership  in  the  Illinois  Athletic  Club  and 
the  Glen  Oaks  Country  Club.  On  the  19th  of  July,  1889,  was  sol- 
emnized the  marriage  of  Mr.  Andrew  to  Miss  Maude  Comstock, 
daughter  of  the  late  Gardner  P.  Comstock,  who  was  for  many  years 
a  prominent  and  influential  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade. 
Of  the  children  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Andrew  two  sons  and  one  daughter 
are  living. 

Philip  Danforth  Armoiu-. — Mr.  Armour  was  distinctively 
American.  His  ancestors  for  generations  were  noted  for  strength 
of  character  and  shrewd  common  sense,  the  maternal  side  being  of 
Puritan  stock.  His  father,  Danforth  Armour,  and  his  mother, 
Julianna  Brooks,  left  Union,  Connecticut,  in  September,  1820,  and 
settled  at  Stockbridge,  Madison  County,  New  York,  where  Philip 
D.  Armour  was  born  May  16,  1832.  There  were  five  brothers  and 
three  sisters.  Farming  was  their  occupation,  and  frugality  and 
industry  without  ceasing  were  their  fundamental  principles.  Their 
school  days  were  the  best  the  local  red  school  house  could  afford, 
but  Philip  was  fortunate  enough  to  attend  the  neighboring  village 


18  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

seminary  at  Cazenovia,  becoming  a  natural  leader  of  his  school- 
mates there.  In  the  course  of  the  winter  of  1851-2  the  excitement 
attending  the  gold  discovery  in  California  having  spread  over  the 
country,  a  party  was  organized  to  make  the  overland  trip  to  Cal- 
ifornia, and  Philip  was  invited  to  join,  being  influenced  to  accept 
by  a  growing  desire  to  get  out  into  the  world.  The  party  left 
Oneida,  New  York,  in  the  spring  of  1852,  and  reached  California 
six  months  later.  In  making  the  trip  they  were  not  exempt  from 
the  trials  and  dangers  attending  similar  journeys.  Armour  was 
too  resolute  and  had  too  fixed  a  purpose  to  yield  to  the  temptations 
of  a  merely  adventurous  life.  He  was  a  born  man  of  affairs,  and 
the  vicissitudes  of  this  early  experience  broadened  his  views  and 
strengthened  his  character.  With  natural  and  trained  prudence  he 
saved  the  financial  results  of  his  mining  and  trading  activities,  and 
returned  to  the  East  in  1856  with  a  sum  considered  ample  in  those 
days  for  embarking  in  commerce.  After  a  long  visit  to  his  parents 
and  family  in  Stockbridge,  he  went  West  again,  entering  the  grain 
commission  business  in  Milwaukee  in  March,  1859.  His  first  part- 
ner was  Frederick  B.  Miles.  They  were  successful,  but  dissolved 
partnership  in  1863.  In  the  course  of  the  same  year,  1863,  a  co- 
partnership was  formed  by  John  Plankinton  and  Philip  Armour, 
which  continued  many  years  and  was  singularly  successful.  Mr. 
Plankinton  had  been  for  some  years  previously  engaged  in  the 
pork  and  beef  packing  business  with  Frederick  Layton,  but  their 
firm  had  dissolved.  Mr.  Plankinton  was  Mr.  Armour's  senior  and 
had  been  a  resident  of  Milwaukee  for  a  much  longer  period.  He 
had  established  a  most  thriving  business  that  had  been  conducted 
with  great  judgment.  He  stood  high  as  a  merchant  and  commanded 
the  respect  of  all  as  a  public-spirited  citizen.  This  was  Mr.  Ar- 
mour's new  opportunity  for  the  exercise  of  his  powers.  To  the 
business  of  Mr.  Plankinton  he  brought  that  unremitting  industry 
and  concentration  of  thought  which  were  so  peculiarly  his  own. 
Careful  attention  to  causes  of  change  in  the  prices  of  provisions 
at  the  close  of  the  war  and  vigor  of  action  at  crises  established  the 
firm  with  a  fortune.  They  seized  the  opportunity  for  extending 
their  growing  business.  At  Chicago,  in  1862,  Mr.  Armour's  brother, 
Herman  O.  Armour,  had  established  himself  in  the  grain  commis- 
sion business,  but  was  induced  by  Philip  to  surrender  this  to  a 
younger  brother,  Joseph  F.  Armour,  in  1865,  and  take  charge  of 
a  new  firm  then  organized  in  New  York  under  the  name  of  Armour, 
Plankinton  &  Co.  The  organization  of  the  New  York  house  was 
most  timely  and  successful.  The  financial  condition  of  the  West 
at  that  period  did  not  permit  of  the  large  lines  of  credit  necessary 
for  the  conduct  of  a  business  assuming  such  magnitude,  and  it  was, 
therefore,  as  events  proved,  most  fortunate  that  the  duties  devolving 
on  the  head  of  this  house  should  come  to  one  eminently  qualified 
to  handle  them.    H.  O.  Armour  was  equal  to  the  emergency,  and 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  19 

was  soon  favorably  known  as  a  man  of  great  financial  ability.    He 
thus  became  the  Eastern  financial  agent  of  all  their  Western  houses. 
The  firm  name  of  H.  O.  Armour  &  Co.  was  continued  at  Chicago 
until   1870.     They  continued   to  handle   grain,  beginning  to  pack 
hogs  in  1868.    This  part  of  the  business,  however,  was  conducted 
under  the  firm  name  of  Armour  &  Co.,  which,  in  1870,  assumed 
all  their  Chicago  operations.     The  business  of  all  these  houses, 
under  their  efficient  management,  grew  to  dimensions  which  were 
the  marvel  of  the  trade.     Their  brands  became  as  well  known  in 
all  the  markets  of  the  world  as  at  home.    In  all  these  developments 
Philip  D.  Armour  was  the  leading  and  dominant  spirit.    It  became 
evident  in  1871  that  the  livestock  producing  power  of  the  country 
was  rapidly  migrating  westward,  and  in  order  to  keep  abreast  of 
it  they  established  at  Kansas  City  the  firm  known  as  Plankinton 
&  Armours.     This  packing  plant  was  under  the  immediate  super- 
vision of  Simeon  B.  Armour,  an  elder  brother.     The  total  output 
of  the  Chicago,  Milwaukee  and  Kansas  City  houses  under  their 
vigorous  leadership  was  enormous.     The  failing  health  of  Joseph, 
at  Chicago,  necessitated  assistance,  and  consequently  Philip  moved, 
in  1875,  to  Chicago,  where  he  resided  until  his  death  in  January, 
1901.    Joseph  Armour  died  in  January,  1881.    The  fraternal  feeling 
manifested  by  Mr.  Armour  on  every  occasion  for  the  welfare  and 
prosperity  of  his  family  was  always  noticeable,  but  especially  when, 
in  1879,  he  induced  another  brother,  Andrew  Watson  Armour,  the 
last  one  to  leave  the  old  homestead  at  Stockbridge,  to  remove  to 
Kansas  City  to  take  charge  of  the  Armour  Brothers'  Bank,  which 
he  managed  with  success.    The  settling  of  A.  W.  Armour  in  Kansas 
City   led    later   to    the    admission    into    the    Kansas    City    packing 
house  of  his  sons  Kirkland  B.  Armour  and  Charles  W.  Armour, 
who  became  the  active  managers  there.     Large  plants  were  later 
established  at  Omaha,  Sioux  City,  East  St.  Louis,  St.  Joseph,  and 
Fort  Worth.    A.  W.  Armour  died  in  May,  1892,  and  S.  B.  Armour 
in  March,  1899.    In  August,  1901,  H.  O.  Armour  died,  and  in  Sep- 
tember of  the  same  year  Kirkland  B.  Armour  passed  away.     His 
sons  Watson  and  Laurance  have  since  entered  the  business  and 
take  part  in  the  Chicago  management.     Quite  recently  Philip  D. 
Armour  III,  the  grandson  of  the  founder  of  the  house,  has  also 
entered  the  management.     As  a  manufacturer  Mr.  Armour  was 
constantly  seeking  greater  economy  and  efficiency  by  preventing 
waste.    Tankage,  blood,  bones  and  other  animal  by-products  were 
turned  to  greater  value  by  a  vigorous  and  complete  system  which 
took  the  place  of  methods  previously  used.    Many  articles  formerly 
removed  at  an  expense,  or  given  away,  or  sold  for  trifling  amounts, 
by  good  handling  and  by  mixture  with  other  suitable  raw  material 
bought  for  the  purpose,  were  made  into  glue,  curled  hair,  ammonia, 
and,  above  all,  into   fertilizers  which   have  almost  revolutionized 
agriculture.     As  a  merchant  he  was  quick  to  see  and  utilize  new 


20  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

outlets  for  all  his  products  by  furnishing  them  to  consumers  at  the 
lowest  possible  prices,  with  guaranteed  excellence.  In  the  years 
1881  and  1882  a  new  method  of  handling  beef  for  the  Eastern 
markets  was  developed.  For  a  number  of  years  experiments  had 
been  made ;  and  now  cattle  which  had  formerly  been  slaughtered 
and  dressed  at  their  destination,  were  killed  at  Western  points, 
and  the  dressed  product  shipped  successfully  in  refrigerator  cars  to 
Eastern  dealers.  This  required  a  large  outlay  of  capital  and  could 
be  successfully  carried  out  only  by  doing  an  immense  business. 
This  method  reduced  the  cost  of  handling  to  a  minimum.  The 
house  of  Armour  &  Co.  became  one  of  the  leaders  of  this  trade. 
Even  before  incorporation,  and  before  the  control  of  all  plants  was 
officially  centered  in  Chicago,  the  strength,  courage  and  genius  of 
Philip  D.  Armour  were  so  manifest  that  his  brothers  and  the  lieu- 
tenants at  all  the  plants  followed  his  wishes  and  suggestions  with 
an  alacrity  and  willingness  that  not  only  showed  their  confidence 
in  him,  but  resulted  in  a  co-operation  of  energy  that  in  itself  insured 
the  highest  success.  Mr.  Armour's  capacity  for  work  was  preem- 
inent. He  was  at  his  desk  by  six  o'clock  in  the  morning  and  fre- 
quently earlier.  Fatigue  was  an  unknown  experience  to  him.  He 
traveled  extensively  but  in  the  interest  always  of  a  wider  intel- 
ligence. He  could  then  be  found  usually  among  those  who  con- 
sumed his  products  and  where  his  agencies  had  been  established 
or  new  ones  created.  He  was  a  close  observer,  but  added  to  this 
was  a  faith  in  the  future.  He  thus  formed  clear  and  accurate  fore- 
casts of  financial  conditions  in  a  growing  country.  He  acted  upon 
them  promptly  and  decidedly.  His  foresight  in  estimating  the 
agricultural  products  of  the  country,  in  both  supply  and  demand — 
notably  provisions  and  grain — was  truly  wonderful.  Mr.  Armour 
inspired  respect  and  aflfection  among  his  friends  and  business  asso- 
ciates to  an  unusual  degree.  Particularly  among  those  connected 
with  the  interests  which  he  controlled,  loyalty  to  him  and  to  his 
wishes  was  preeminent.  It  inevitably  was  a  large  element  in  his 
progress.  He  could  always  count  upon  the  cooperation  of  his  men. 
Their  devotion  amounted  to  an  enthusiasm.  His  extensive  grain 
and  elevator  interests  were  conducted  under  a  separate  organiza- 
tion, developing  from  modest  beginnings  in  1875  to  a  commanding 
place  in  the  trade.  At  the  earnest  solicitation  of  the  late  Alexander 
Mitchell,  he  became  one  of  the  directors  of  the  Chicago,  Milwaukee 
&  St.  Paul  Railway.  Mr.  Armour  married  Malvina  Belle  Ogden, 
at  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  in  October,  1862.  She  was  the  only  daughter 
of  Jonathan  Ogden.  The  home  life  of  this  remarkable  couple  was 
singularly  happy.  Mr.  Armour  had  the  faculty  of  leaving  his  busi- 
ness cares  at  his  office  and  entering  his  family  circle  with  the  con- 
tent and  enjoyment  of  a  simple  and  gracious  life.  Two  sons  were 
born  to  them — J.  Ogden  and  Philip  D.  Jr.,  who  became  partners 
with  their  father.     Philip  Jr.  died  in  1900.     J.  Ogden  Armour,  to 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  21 

whom  full  responsibility  has  descended,  carries  his  honors  grace- 
fully and  with  becoming  modesty.  Under  his  steady  hand  the  in- 
terests to  which  he  succeeded  have  very  greatly  expanded  and  have 
continued  to  prosper.  Modern  methods  have  been  adopted  and 
efficiency  increased  thereby.  In  January,  1881,  Joseph  F.  Armour 
died  and  bequeathed  $100,000  for  the  founding  of  a  charitable  insti- 
tution, the  Armour  Mission.  He  wisely  directed  that  the  carrying 
out  of  his  benevolent  design  should  be  chiefly  entrusted  to  his 
brother,  the  subject  of  this  sketch.  In  accepting  the  trust  so  im- 
posed, Philip  D.  Armour  gave  to  it  the  same  energetic  and  critical 
attention  which  he  has  given  to  his  private  affairs,  and  added  a 
large  gift  to  his  brother's  bequest.  The  mission  is  a  broadly  con- 
ceived and  wholly  non-sectarian  institution.  It  is  free  and  open 
to  all  to  the  full  extent  of  its  capacity,  without  any  condition  im- 
posed as  to  race  or  creed.  The  Armour  Institute  of  Technology 
is  the  outgrowth  of  this  working  purpose,  which  has  been  shared 
by  the  family.  It  is  a  school  of  engineering  whose  graduates  num- 
ber more  than  a  thousand.  The  institution  was  founded  for  the 
purpose  of  giving  to  young  men  an  opportunity  to  secure  a  sci- 
entific and  engineering  education.  It  is  not  intended  for  the  poor 
or  the  rich  as  sections  of  society.  Its  aim  is  broadly  philanthropic. 
Profoundly  realizing  the  importance  of  self-reliance  as  a  factor  in 
the  development  of  character,  the  founder  conditioned  his  bene- 
factions in  such  a  way  as  to  emphasize  both  their  value  and  the 
student's  self-respect.  To  these  institutions  Mr.  P.  D.  Armour 
contributed  more  than  a  million  and  a  half,  and  his  son  has  con- 
tributed two  millions.  It  was  the  combination  of  sagacity,  untiring 
energy,  and  philanthropy  which  made  the  name  of  Philip  D.  Ar- 
mour influential  in  the  nation  he  loved.  These  have  given  him  his 
place  as  a  recognized  leader  among  the  merchants  of  the  world, 
and  a  man  honored  and  beloved  for  his  helpful  generosity  in  behalf 
of  his  fellow  men. 

J.  Ogden  Armour. — During  the  entire  course  of  the  splendid 
history  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  it  has  been 
signally  fortunate  in  maintaining  the  support  and  loyal  co-operation 
of  those  strong,  resolute  and  resourceful  men  of  affairs  who  have 
stood  forth  as  the  more  influential  and  honored  figures  in  the  gen- 
eral civic  and  business  life  of  the  city,  as  one  generation  has  fol- 
lowed another  on  to  the  stage  of  productive  and  benignant  activity 
that  has  resulted  in  the  upbuilding  of  a  great  metropolis.  There 
have  been  names  that  have  become  as  familiar  to  the  nation  at  large 
as  that  of  Chicago  itself,  and  such  a  name  is  that  of  Armour,  which 
has  been  intimately  and  most  conspicuously  identified  with  the 
development  and  upbuilding  of  the  city  along  industrial  and  com- 
mercial lines  and  which  has  always  stood  exponent  of  loyal  and 
liberal  citizenship  signified  in  worthy  and  great  achievement  rather 
than  of  any  display  of  "majesty,  pomp  and  power."     In  the  Ameri- 


22  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

can  industrial  world  this  has  been  and  continues  a  great  name  and 
a  good  name.  It  has  stood  for  thought  and  action ;  it  has,  without 
the  blare  of  trumpets  or  other  marks  of  mere  objective  display, 
stood  for  the  maximum  of  usefulness  and  for  the  highest  ideals  of 
personal  stewardship  and  business  integrity.  It  is  quite  outside  the 
province  of  this  publication  to  attempt  review  of  the  career  of  the 
late  Philip  D.  Armour,  the  founder  of  the  ponderous  and  far  reach- 
ing industrial  and  commercial  enterprises  that  perpetuate  his  name 
and  stand  as  a  monument  to  his  noble  and  vigorous  manhood  and 
that  have  been  one  of  the  most  important  factors  in  the  growth 
and  general  progress  of  the  great  metropolis  that  sits  enthroned  at 
the  foot  of  Lake  Michigan.  It  was  given  to  him  to  wield  direct  and 
also  much  reflex  influence  in  connection  with  the  operations  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  and  appreciative  of  all  that  his  name  and  work 
has  meant  in  the  history  of  Chicago  it  is  most  gratifying  to  find 
that  his  sons  have  fully  upheld  the  high  prestige  of  their  patronymic 
and  that  they  likewise  are  to  be  found  enrolled  as  representative 
members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  the  while  in  the  industrial  world 
they  have  not  stood  in  the  shadow  of  paternal  greatness  but  have 
marked  a  place  of  their  own  as  sterling  captains  of  industry  and  as 
valiant  figures  in  the  world's  noble  army  of  productive  workers. 
Neither  great  wealth  nor  its  attendant  influence  have  drawn  them 
from  the  field  of  work,  and  only  he  who  works  with  concentration, 
with  a  due  sense  of  individual  responsibility  and  with  the  instinct 
of  progressiveness,  justifies  himself  to  the  world  and  in  the  scheme 
of  human  motive  and  action.  Thus  it  is  a  privilege  to  accord  in 
this  history  recognition  to  J.  Ogden  Armour  as  a  member  and  loyal 
supporter  of  the  Board  of  Trade  rather  than  to  attempt  a  specific 
review  of  his  career  or  to  give  an  epitome  of  his  vast  industrial  and 
capitalistic  interests.  J.  Ogden  Armour,  whose  membership  on  the 
Board  of  Trade  dates  from  Nov.  12,  1884,  was  born  in  the  city  of 
Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  on  the  11th  of  November,  1863,  and  is  a 
son  of  Philip  Danforth  Armour  and  Malvina  Belle  Armour,  his 
father  having  been  the  founder  of  the  great  packing  and  provision 
business  that  has  given  to  the  family  name  a  worldwide  reputation. 
After  due  preliminary  discipline  J.  Ogden  Armour  was  matriculated 
in  historic  old  Yale  University,  but  in  the  same  he  did  not  complete 
a  course,  as  he  withdrew  at  the  request  of  his  father,  who  desired 
him  to  return  to  Chicago  and  assume  active  duties  and  responsi- 
bilities in  connection  with  the  management  of  the  enormous  in- 
terests of  Armour  &  Company.  He  has  never  had  cause  to  regret 
the  course  he  followed  at  this  time,  for  he  was  able  not  only  to 
relieve  his  father  of  much  of  the  ever  increasing  burden  of  responsi- 
bility involved  in  the  enormous  business,  but  also  to  gain  that 
broadening  and  practical  education  that  is  to  be  obtained  only  under 
the  direction  of  that  wisest  of  all  head-masters,  experience.  It  is 
sufficient  to  say  that  with  the  passing  years  Mr.  Armour  has  proved, 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  23 


as  a  man  of  splendid  initiative  power  and  administrative  ability, 
equal  to  all  demands  placed  upon  him  in  connection  w^ith  the  order- 
ing of  the  affairs  of  a  great  estate  and  great  industrial  and  com- 
mercial enterprises  that  stand  most  definitely  in  exemplification  of 
the  true  American  spirit  of  courage,  progressiveness  and  potency. 
Mr.  Armour  is  president  of  the  great  corporation  of  Armour  &  Com- 
pany. He  is  a  director  in  each  of  the  following  named  corpora- 
tions :  The  Armour  Car  Lines ;  the  Armour  Grain  Company ;  the 
Chicago,  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railway  Company ;  the  Continental 
National  Bank  of  Chicago ;  the  Northwestern  National  Insurance 
Company ;  the  Illinois  Central  Railway  Company,  and  the  National 
City  Bank  of  New  York  besides  being  financially  concerned  with 
many  other  important  corporate  enterprises.  Mr.  Armour  has  been 
distinctively  a  student  of  economic  afifairs,  especially  those  involved 
in  American  and  international  commerce,  and  he  has  fortified  him- 
self staunchly  in  his  convictions  concerning  governmental  policies, 
the  while  he  gives  his  political  allegiance  unswervingly  to  the  Re- 
publican party.  He  is  the  author  of  a  carefully  prepared,  liberal  and 
authoritative  work  entitled  "The  Packers  and  the  People,"  which 
was  published  in  1906.  While  appreciative  fully  of  the  finer 
amenities  of  social  life  and  known  for  his  civic  loyalty  and  pro- 
gressiveness, Mr.  Armour  is  emphatically  a  business  man  and  has 
not  cared  to  identify  himself  with  any  appreciable  number  of  social 
organizations.  He  holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Club  and  was 
a  member  also  of  the  historic  old  Calumet  Club  until  its  dissolution, 
in  1915.  Mr.  Armour  married  Miss  Lolita  Sheldon,  of  New  York 
city,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Lolita. 

Samuel  P.  Amot. — Into  the  grain  commission  trade  of  Chicago 
have  been  drawn  many  representatives  from  the  most  diverse  sec- 
tions of  the  Union,  and  of  those  who  are  thus  identified  successfully 
with  this  line  of  enterprise  in  the  western  metropolis  one  who  can 
claim  the  fine  old  commonwealth  of  West  Virginia  as  his  place  of 
nativity  is  he  whose  name  introduces  this  paragraph  and  whose 
name  has  been  enrolled  on  the  roster  of  the  members  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  since  1900,  his  popularity  in  the  organization  being  indi- 
cated by  that  fact  that  he  has  given  three  years  of  effective  service 
in  the  office  of  Director  of  the  Board.  Mr.  Arnot  is  the  executive 
head  of  the  firm  of  Arnot  &  Company,  which  is  substantially  estab- 
lished in  the  grain  commission  business  in  Chicago,  with  offices  at 
140  West  Van  Buren  street,  and  prior  to  entering  this  field  of  com- 
mercial enterprise  he  had  made  for  himself  an  excellent  reputation 
as  a  representative  of  the  pedagogic  profession.  Samuel  P.  Arnot 
was  born  at  Greenville,  Monroe  county.  West  Virginia,  on  the  29th 
of  August,  1867,  and  is  a  son  of  E.  T.  and  Ruth  A.  Arnot,  repre- 
sentatives of  old  and  honored  Southern  families.  After  duly  avail- 
ing himself  of  the  advantages  of  both  public  and  private  schools  in 
his  native  state  Mr.  Arnot  was  for  a  time  a  student  in  the  historic 


24  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

old  University  of  Virginia,  at  Charlottesville,  and  he  subsequently 
graduated  at  Fremont  College,  from  which  institution  he  received 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science.  His  career  as  a  teacher  covered 
a  period  of  several  years,  within  which  he  held  preferment  as  super- 
intendent of  schools  at  various  places. 

Since  Mr.  Arnot  became  a  resident  of  Chicago  he  has  proved 
himself  a  resourceful  and  progressive  factor  in  connection  with  the 
commission  grain  business  in  this  city,  the  firm  of  which  he  is  a 
member  now  having  control  of  a  large  and  substantial  trade  and 
having  in  him  an  effective  and  popular  representative  on  the  Board 
of  Trade.  Mr.  Arnot  is  one  of  the  loyal  and  wide-awake  citizens 
of  Chicago,  maintains  his  residence  at  921  Argyle  street,  in  the 
northern  section  of  the  city,  and  is  an  active  member  of  the  Chicago 
Athletic  Association  and  the  Edgewater  Golf  Club,  besides  being 
affiliated  with  the  Masonic  fraternity,  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and 
the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men.  The  22nd  of  August,  1896,  bore 
record  of  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Arnot  to  Miss  Stella  Varner.  They 
have  no  children. 

L.  Howard  Ash. — The  true  history  of  an  organization  is  best 
told  in  a  record  of  the  lives  of  the  individuals  who  compose  its 
membership  and  who,  in  their  every  day  lives  and  actions,  have  been 
contributive  factors  in  the  growth  and  development  of  the  institu- 
tion which  they  represent  and  with  which  they  have  been  con- 
nected. The  marvelous  record  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  rests 
not  alone  upon  the  magnitude  of  its  transactions  but  is  also  due  in 
large  measure  to  the  happy  fact  that  numbered  among  its  members 
are  many  men  of  sterling  character  and  broad  vision  who,  in  dig- 
nified and  unostentatious  manner,  have  conducted  their  dealings 
and  transactions  upon  the  highest  plane  of  strict  business  equity 
and  integrity,  upholding  the  best  traditions  of  the  Board  and  making 
their  personal  success  co-ordinate  with  its  welfare  and  develop- 
ment. The  member  whose  name  heads  this  brief  review  is  a  native 
of  the  state  of  Iowa,  born  in  Mount  Vernon,  January  10,  1850,  a 
son  of  Reuben  and  Hannah  (Day)  Ash.  His  early  boyhood  was 
spent  in  his  native  village,  where  he  enjoyed  the  advantages  of  a 
public  school  education  and  also  attaining  his  junior  year  in  Cornell 
College,  one  of  the  well  known  smaller  institutions  of  learning 
where  thoroughness  of  instruction  rather  than  extensive  enrollment 
is  the  object  sought.  After  serving  as  clerk  in  mercantile  lines,  he 
came  to  Chicago,  in  1871,  and  accepted  a  position  with  I.  N.  Ash  & 
Company,  one  of  the  well  known  receiving  houses  of  the  Board  and 
there  began  the  work  which  has  since  claimed  his  attention,  his 
initiation  into  the  methods  and  mysteries  of  the  trading  pit  as  a 
representative  of  the  above  named  firm,  leading  to  an  individual 
membership  in  1873.  In  1881  he  organized  the  firm  of  Ash  &  Ben- 
nett and  later  became  the  head  of  the  firm  of  L.  H.  Ash  &  Company, 
doing  a  general  and  extensive  commission  business  which  continued 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  25 

until  later  in  the  same  year,  since  which  time,  he  has  operated  as 
an  independent  broker,  specializing  in  the  corn  trade.  During  his 
association  with  the  Board  Mr.  Ash  has  contributed  of  his  time  and 
effort  by  serving  as  a  member  of  the  arbitration  committee  and 
otherwise  taking  a  lively  interest  in  the  welfare  and  promotion  of 
the  organization,  and  all  movements  tending  toward  the  elevation 
of  business  ethics  and  standards  have  received  his  quiet  though 
willing  support.  March  22,  1899,  he  was  united  in  marriage  with 
Mary  E.  Magner  and  to  them  has  been  born  one  daughter.  In 
political  faith  Mr.  Ash  is  Republican.  He  has  held  membership 
in  various  social  organizations,  retaining  at  the  present,  his  mem- 
bership in  the  Glen  View  Golf  Club  and  of  the  Hawkeye  Fellowship 
Club  of  Chicago. 

Orville  E.  Babcock. — The  banking  and  brokerage  firm  of  Bab- 
cock,  Rushton  &  Company  is  one  of  importance  and  influence  in 
connection  with  Chicago  brokerage  operations  in  grain,  stocks  and 
bonds  and  is  the  direct  successor  of  the  old  firm  of  John  C.  King  & 
Company.  Mr.  Babcock  is  a  senior  partner  of  the  firm  and  holds 
membership  on  the  Chicago  Stock  Exchange,  New  York  Stock  Ex- 
change and  the  St.  Louis  Merchants  Exchange.  Mr.  Babcock  was 
born  in  Chicago,  August  13,  1872,  and  is  a  son  of  General  Orville  E. 
and  Annie  (Campbell)  Babcock,  his  father  having  rendered  dis- 
tinguished service  as  an  officer  in  the  United  States  Army.  Mr. 
Babcock  graduated  from  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School,  Yale  Uni- 
versity, in  the  class  of  1894.  In  the  year  1896  Mr.  Babcock  became 
a  member  of  the  firm  of  John  C.  King  &  Company,  bankers  and 
brokers,  and  this  alliance  continued  after  the  title  had  been  changed 
to  King,  Hodenpyl  &  Company,  as  well  as  after  the  original  firm 
name  had  again  been  adopted.  He  remained  one  of  the  interested 
principals  in  the  firm  of  John  C.  King  &  Company  until  January  1, 
1907,  when  Mr.  King  retired,  the  firm  was  reorganized  and  the 
present  title  of  Babcock,  Rushton  &  Company  was  assumed.  Mr. 
Babcock  is  a  Republican  and  member  of  the  following  clubs:  Chi- 
cago, University,  South  Shore  Country,  Onwentsia,  Saddle  and 
Cycle,  and  the  Racquet  and  Tennis  Club  of  New  York  city.  Mr. 
Babcock  was  married  to  Miss  Ellen  Walsh  of  Chicago  on  Novem- 
ber 20,  1901,  and  resides  at  Lake  Forest,  Illinois. 

Edward  R.  Bacon. — Recognized  as  a  man  of  high  intellectual 
attainments  and  civic  ideals,  Edward  Richardson  Bacon  has  effect- 
ively shown  his  resourcefulness,  discrimination  and  administrative 
ability  in  the  building  up  of  a  specially  large  and  substantial  busi- 
ness as  a  broker  and  dealer  in  grain,  and  for  nearly  forty  years  he 
has  held  a  place  of  prominence  and  influence  as  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  though  his  distinctive  per- 
sonal attributes  are  such  that  he  has  never  sought  the  limelight  of 
publicity  or  appeared  as  a  spectacular  figure  in  connection  with 
the  operations  of  the  Board  of  Trade  or  in  speculative  enterprise. 


26  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

He  is  one  of  the  straightforward,  progressive  and  successful  busi- 
ness men  who  most  effectively  exemplify  the  true  civic  spirit  of  the 
great  metropolis  of  the  West  and  his  is  the  prestige  of  being  a  scion 
of  one  of  the  sterling  pioneer  families  of  Chicago,  within  whose 
borders  he  has  maintained  his  home  from  the  time  of  his  birth  and 
to  which  he  pays  the  utmost  loyalty.  Mr.  Bacon  was  born  in  Chi- 
cago on  the  22d  of  February,  1857,  and  in  his  specific  individuality 
and  his  business  activities  he  may  consistently  be  said  to  have  kept 
in  close  touch  with  the  splendid  work  that  has  resulted  in  the  de- 
velopment and  upbuilding  of  the  great  metropolis  at  the  foot  of  Lake 
Michigan,  the  while  he  stands  exemplar  of  civic  liberality  and  pro- 
gressiveness.  Mr.  Bacon  is  a  son  of  Moses  Sawin  Bacon  and 
Georgiana  (Richardson)  Bacon,  both  being  natives  of  Massa- 
chusetts. The  parents  established  their  residence  in  Chicago  in 
1855.  Here  Moses  S.  Bacon  achieved  success  and  influence  and  he 
was  one  of  the  well  known  and  highly  honored  citizens  of  Chicago 
at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  whose  name  initiates  this  review  duly 
availed  himself  of  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
city  and  then  entered  the  historic  old  Phillips  Exeter  Academy,  at 
Exeter,  New  Hampshire,  in  which  he  prepared  for  college.  Thus 
fortified  in  a  preliminary  way,  he  was  matriculated  in  Harvard  Uni- 
versity, in  which  institution  he  completed  the  full  academic  or 
literary  course  and  was  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1878, 
in  which  year  he  received  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  At 
Harvard  he  became  affiliated  with  the  Pi  Eta  fraternity  and  also 
was  an  active  member  of  the  Harvard  Squad,  a  representative  mili- 
tary organization.  His  scholastic  tastes  and  ideals  have  not  been 
permitted  to  grow  dull  with  the  passing  years,  and  it  may  con- 
sistently be  said  that  he  has  continued  to  the  present  time  an  ap- 
preciative student  and  reader  of  the  best  in  literature.  After  leav- 
ing college  Mr.  Bacon  returned  to  Chicago,  and  here  he  has  been 
closely  associated  with  the  grain  business  during  the  long  inter- 
vening years,  which  have  been  marked  by  large  and  worthy  achieve- 
ment on  his  part  and  given  him  precedence  as  one  of  the  representa- 
tive factors  in  this  field  of  industrial  enterprise  in  the  western 
metropolis.  Mr.  Bacon  has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
since  1880  and  has  at  all  times  shown  a  lively  and  loyal  interest  in 
all  things  relative  to  its  welfare.  He  has  exercised  an  unassuming 
but  potent  influence  in  connection  with  the  governmental  affairs  and 
general  activities  of  the  Board,  and  has  inviolable  place  in  the  con- 
fidence and  esteem  of  its  members,  the  while  he  now  figures  as  one 
of  its  veteran  representatives.  His  business  is  conducted  in  an 
individual  way  and  under  his  own  name,  his  offices  being  at  230 
South  La  Salle  street.  The  grain  elevator  of  Mr.  Bacon  is  eligibly 
situated  at  West  Thirty-third  street,  on  the  south  branch  of  the 
Chicago  River,  and  he  has  adjunct  facilities  of  similar  type  at  One 
Hundred  and  Sixth  street  and  the  Calumet  River.     Mr.  Bacon  is 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  27 

actively  identified  with  the  Harvard  Club  of  Chicago  and  with  the 
Scituate  Yacht  Club  of  Scituate,  Massachusetts,  where  is  main- 
tained the  summer  home  of  the  family.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are 
communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church.  The  family 
home  is  at  452  Briar  Place,  in  the  beautiful  Lake  View  section  of 
Chicago.  On  the  6th  of  January,  1902,  was  solemnized  the  marriage 
of  Mr.  Bacon  to  Miss  Katherine  Disborough  Bogart,  and  they  have 
four  children :  Raymond  C,  Edward  R.,  Jr.,  John  William,  and 
Robert  Cram. 

John  J.  Badenoch. — A  scion  of  staunch  Scottish  ancestry  and 
claiming  the  land  of  hills  and  heather  as  the  place  of  his  nativity, 
Mr.  Badenoch  has  shown  forth  in  his  character  and  achievement  the 
admirable  attributes  that  have  been  significantly  exemplified  in 
the  race  from  which  he  sprung,  and  the  loyalty  and  ability  that  have 
made  him  an  honored  and  influential  citizen  of  Chicago  have  been 
shown  forth  equally  in  his  association  with  the  afifairs  of  the  Board 
of  Trade,  his  membership  in  which  representative  body  dates  from 
the  year  1874.  He  was  a  child  at  the  time  of  the  family  immigra- 
tion from  Scotland  to  America  and  has  been  a  citizen  of  Chicago 
since  the  year  1867.  In  1873  he  established  the  present  J.  J.  Bade- 
noch Company,  commission  merchants  and  shippers  of  hay,  grain, 
feed,  etc.,  and  this  is  now  one  of  the  oldest  and  most  important  con- 
cerns of  its  kind  in  the  western  metropolis,  with  an  extensive  and 
substantial  business  that  is  founded  on  long  years  of  fair  and  hon- 
orable dealings.  Mr.  Badenoch  still  continues  at  the  head  of  the 
business  and  is  also  to  be  consistently  designated  at  the  present 
time  as  one  of  the  veteran  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  which 
he  has  honored  and  been  honored  by,  even  as  he  has  stood  exponent 
of  leal  and  loyal  citizenship  and  of  high  civic  ideals.  He  has  been 
called  upon  to  serve  in  various  municipal  offices  of  high  trust,  and 
of  the  same  mention  will  be  made  in  a  succeeding  paragraph.  John 
Joseph  Badenoch  was  born  in  Fyfeshire,  Scotland,  on  the  19th  of 
April,  1851,  and  is  a  son  of  Joseph  and  Helen  (Tough)  Badenoch, 
who  came  to  the  United  States  in  the  year  1856  and  established 
their  home  in  New  York  city.  In  the  public  schools  of  the  national 
metropolis  John  J.  Badenoch  acquired  his  early  education  and  there 
he  initiated  his  business  career  by  assuming  the  dignified  preroga- 
tives of  an  errand  boy.  In  1867,  as  a  lad  of  about  sixteen  years,  he 
came  to  Chicago,  where  for  the  ensuing  seven  years  he  was  in  the 
employ  of  the  firm  of  M.  Kronberg  &  Company,  prominent  whole- 
sale jewelers  of  the  day  and  locality.  In  1873,  at  the  time  when 
Chicago  was  still  bravely  struggling  to  overcome  the  handicap 
caused  by  the  great  fire  of  1871,  he  became  the  founder  of  the  present 
J.  J.  Badenoch  Company,  which  has  had  a  consecutive  and  success- 
ful history  in  connection  with  the  grain  commission  trade  and  with 
the  buying  and  shipping  of  grain,  hay,  feed,  etc.  The  business  was 
incorporated  under  this  title  in  the  year  1894,  and  the  founder  has 


28  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

since  served  as  president  of  the  corporation  whose  substantial  and 
prosperous  business  has  been  evolved  and  developed  under  his  able 
and  honorable  direction.  Associated  with  him  in  conducting  the 
representative  enterprise  are  four  of  his  sons,  of  whom  Joseph  W. 
and  David  A.  are  active  members  also  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  Mr. 
Badenoch  has  long  been  arrayed  as  a  veritable  stalwart  in  the  ranks 
of  the  Republican  party  and  it  has  been  his  to  give  to  Chicago 
splendid  service  in  positions  of  public  trust  and  responsibility.  For 
a  period  of  two  years  he  represented  the  old  Eleventh  ward  as  a 
member  of  the  board  of  aldermen ;  for  three  years  he  was  president 
of  the  board  of  election  commissioners  of  Chicago,  and  for  a  similar 
period  he  was  giving  an  equally  faithful  and  efifective  administration 
as  a  member  of  the  Chicago  board  of  education.  April  11,  1895, 
there  came  to  him  exacting  and  important  official  preferment,  when 
he  was  chosen  general  superintendent  of  the  Chicago  police  depart- 
ment, a  position  of  which  he  continued  the  incumbent  two  years 
and  in  which  he  gave  a  signally  circumspect  and  effective  adminis- 
tration, the  record  of  which  has  now  become  an  integral  part  of 
Chicago  history.  Mr.  Badenoch  has  been  long  and  prominently 
affiliated  with  the  time-honored  Masonic  fraternity.  He  was  one 
of  the  founders  of  the  Masonic  Orphans'  Home  of  Illinois,  of  which 
he  has  served  long  and  ably  as  president,  and  he  is  a  past  com- 
mander of  that  representative  Masonic  organization,  St.  Bernard 
Commandery  35,  Knights  Templar,  his  ancestral  history  making 
specially  consonant  his  further  affiliation  with  the  Scottish  Rite 
bodies  of  Masonry,  in  connection  with  which  he  has  received  the 
thirty-second  degree.  Marking  his  lively  appreciation  of  the  history 
and  traditions  of  his  native  land,  Mr.  Badenoch  is  found  as  one  of 
the  prominent  and  influential  members  of  the  St.  Andrew's  Society 
of  Chicago,  of  which  he  served  as  president  for  three  years.  He  is 
a  popular  member  of  various  other  social  organizations,  including 
the  Illinois  Club,  and  he  is  one  of  the  sterling  and  influential  citizens 
whom  Chicago  delights  to  honor.  His  attractive  city  residence  is  on 
Washington  boulevard  and  the  summer  home  of  the  family  is  at 
Brown's  Lake,  near  Burlington,  Wisconsin,  where  he  indulges  in 
but  talks  less  of  his  piscatorial  and  other  acquatic  prowess.  In 
1874  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Badenoch  to  Miss  Clem- 
ence  Ward,  of  Chicago,  and  of  their  six  children  all  are  living  except 
the  second,  John  Joseph,  Jr.,  who  died  at  the  age  of  twenty-three 
years.  The  surviving  children  are:  Joseph  W.,  Edward  C,  Annie 
L.  (wife  of  Rev.  Percy  W.  Stephens),  David  A.,  and  Ernest  W. 
Mr.  Badenoch  has  for  the  past  twenty-five  years  been  a  member 
and  trustee  of  the  Second  Baptist  church. 

EdAward  W.  Bailey. — With  all  of  consistency  may  it  be  said 
that  the  course  of  Edward  WilHam  Bailey  in  all  of  the  relations  of 
life  has  been  guided  and  dominated  by  a  high  sense  of  personal 
stewardship,  and  steadfast  loyalty,  and  it  is  to  such  men  that  the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  29 

Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  has  had  recourse  in  the  main- 
taining of  its  wonderful  prestige  and  fine  ideals  and  ethics,  which, 
with  the  concomitant  activities  of  stupendous  order,  have  made  it 
the  greatest  commercial  body  of  the  kind  in  the  entire  world.  Mr. 
Bailey  has  been  for  many  years  a  prominent  and  successful  repre- 
sentative of  the  commission  grain  and  provision  business  in  Chicago, 
and  no  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  has  maintained  a  higher 
reputation,  as  may  well  be  understood  from  the  pertinence  of  the 
following  statements  that  have  been  written  concerning  him: 
"While  the  activities  of  Edward  W.  Bailey  have  brought  him  sub- 
stantial and  well  merited  success,  his  achievements  in  the  world  of 
commerce  have  never  sacrificed  the  interests  of  others.  His  name 
is  synonymous  with  commercial  integrity,  and  at  the  same  time  he 
possesses  the  strong,  purposeful  spirit  that  finds  exemplification  in 
the  prompt  and  ready  execution  of  well  defined  plans  and  the  co- 
ordination of  forces  into  a  resultant  and  unified  whole.  With  the 
dignity  that  effectually  bars  undue  familiarity  and  with  personal 
character  that  begets  warm  friendships,  he  is  today  one  of  the 
honored  and  substantial  business  men  of  the  western  metropolis." 
Mr.  Bailey  has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago  since  1879  and  his  mem- 
bership on  the  Board  of  Trade  dates  from  that  year.  He  has  shown 
forth  the  best  attributes  of  the  fine  New  England  stock  of  which 
he  is  a  representative,  and  is  the  type  of  member  who  has  given 
strength,  solidity  and  distinction  to  the  Board  of  Trade,  which  has 
profited  fully  through  his  interposition  and  through  his  service  as 
a  member  of  its  directorate  and  also  as  its  vice-president.  He  is 
known  and  honored  as  one  of  the  representative  figures  in  the  grain 
commission  trade  centered  in  Chicago,  where  he  is  the  executive 
head  of  the  firm  of  E.  W.  Bailey  &  Company,  with  offices  in  the 
Board  of  Trade  Building,  and  with  a  branch  office  at  Montpelier, 
Vermont,  the  fine  old  capital  city  of  his  native  State.  Mr  Bailey  was 
born  at  Elmore,  Lamoille  county,  Vermont,  on  the  31st  of  August, 
1843,  and  is  a  son  of  George  W.  and  Rebecca  (Warren)  Bailey,  both 
natives  of  Berlin  township,  Washington  county,  that  State,  the  re- 
spective families  having  been  founded  in  New  England  in  the  colo- 
nial period  of  our  national  history  and  the  lineage  of  the  Bailey  fam- 
ily tracing  back  to  staunch  Scotch  origin.  In  this  connection  a  con- 
sistently appreciative  estimate  has  been  written  in  the  following  sig- 
nificant words:  "There  is  in  Edward  W.  Bailey  a  strong  trace  of  that 
inflexible  adherence  to  duty  which  is  characteristic  of  the  Scotch 
race."  The  youngest  of  a  family  of  ten  children,  Edward  W.  Bailey, 
found  the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  compassed  by  the  in- 
vigorating influences  of  New  England  surroundings,  his  father 
having  been  a  substantial  agriculturist  in  Washington  county,  Ver- 
mont, besides  serving  his  state  as  a  member  of  her  legislative  bodies 
and  also  as  judge  of  the  probate  court.  The  subject  of  this  review 
did  not  fail  to  make  good  use  of  the  advantages  afforded  in  the 


30  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

common  schools,  including  the  grammar  school  in  the  city  of  Mont- 
pelier.  At  an  early  age  he  was  found  actively  engaged  in  the  man- 
agement of  the  home  farm,  the  failing  health  of  the  father  having 
placed  this  responsibility  upon  him  and  limiting  temporarily  the 
trend  of  his  ambition.  Following  the  father's  death  in  1869,  he 
became  identified  with  the  grocery  business  in  the  city  of  Mont- 
pelier.  In  the  following  year  he  there  became  also  the  owner  of  a 
grist  mill,  and  thus  was  initiated  his  association  with  the  grain 
business.  In  1879  Mr.  Bailey  subordinated  his  business  interests 
in  the  old  Green  Mountain  State  and,  with  the  mental  fiber  and 
determined  purpose  that  have  always  caused  the  sturdy  sons  of  New 
England  to  find  a  special  attraction  in  the  progressive  West,  he 
came  to  Chicago,  which  city  was  then  making  rapid  strides  to  re- 
cover from  the  physical  and  civic  prostration  entailed  by  the  great 
fire  of  1871.  His  purpose  in  coming  to  Chicago  was  mainly  his 
appreciation  of  the  fact  that  this  city  was  destined  to  become  the 
great  national  center  of  the  grain  commerce,  in  connection  with 
which  he  saw  an  opportunity  for  personal  advancement  and  the 
attaining  of  success  worthy  of  its  name.  Here  he  engaged  in  the 
commission  grain  trade,  in  which  he  became  associated  with  the 
late  Vernon  W.  Bullock,  whose  interest  in  the  business  he  pur- 
chased three  years  later.  In  the  meanwhile  he  continued  his  asso- 
ciation with  the  milling  and  grain  business  at  Montpelier,  Vermont, 
his  loyalty  to  his  native  commonwealth  having  been  shown  by  his 
maintaining  to  the  present  day  a  branch  business  office  at  Mont- 
pelier. Concerning  his  earnest  activities  in  Chicago  the  following 
pertinent  statements  have  been  written,  and  they  are  worthy  of 
perpetuation  in  this  connection :  "His  course  was  marked  by  con- 
secutive advancement  until,  like  many  others,  he  became  involved 
in  the  widespread  financial  panic  of  1893.  His  unfaltering  purpose 
and  ready  adaptability,  however,  have  placed  him  once  more  in  the 
ranks  of  the  city's  representative  business  men,  with  every  financial 
obligation  wiped  out  and  with  command  of  larger  and  more  im- 
portant interests  than  ever  before.  He  has  been  honored  by  elec- 
tion to  the  offices  of  director  and  vice-president  of  the  Board  of 
Trade,  and  his  services  in  behalf  of  that  body  have  been  signally 
beneficial.  He  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  foremost  representatives 
of  the  grain  and  provision  commission  business  of  Chicago."  The 
character  of  Mr.  Bailey  is  the  positive  expression  of  a  strong,  true 
and  loyal  nature,  and  as  a  citizen  he  has  shown  himself  vigorous, 
appreciative  and  public-spirited,  without  any  predilection  for  public 
office  of  any  kind.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  Repub- 
lican party,  and  for  many  years  he  was  an  active  member  of  the 
Central  Church,  which  gained  wonderful  prestige  under  the  pastor- 
ate of  the  late  and  revered  Professor  David  Swing.  He  is  identified 
with  the  New  England  Society  of  Chicago,  and  also  with  the  Union 
League  Club  and  the  South  Shore  Country  Club.    At  Montpelier, 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  31 

Vermont,  on  the  26th  of  May,  1870,  Mr.  Bailey  wedded  Miss  Jennie 
Carter,  and  she  passed  to  the  life  eternal  in  1908.  She  is  survived 
by  two  children,  George  C.  and  Mary  Blanchard,  the  latter  of  whom 
is  now  the  wife  of  Fred  Meyer.  In  October,  1909,  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Bailey  to  Miss  Cora  Haseltine,  of  Chicago,  and 
their  home  is  at  4858  Kenwood  avenue. 

Alfred  L.  Baker. — Coming  from  the  old  Bay  State  to  Chicago 
as  a  young  man,  Alfred  Landon  Baker  gained  there  his  initial  suc- 
cess as  an  ambitious  representative  of  the  legal  profession.  He  con- 
tinued the  active  practice  of  law  for  a  decade,  at  the  expiration  of 
which  he  entered  into  the  banking  and  brokerage  business,  of  which 
he  has  become  an  influential  exponent  in  the  great  metropolis  of  the 
west.  He  is  senior  member  of  the  well-known  firm  of  Alfred  L. 
Baker  &  Company,  which  conducts  a  large  and  substantial  broker- 
age business  with  offices  at  No.  141  South  La  Salle  street,  in  which 
he  has  gained  distinctive  precedence  in  the  handling  of  stocks,  bonds, 
investment  securities,  and  grain.  Mr.  Baker  has  proved  himself  an 
influential  force  with  the  commercial  and  industrial  interests  cen- 
tered in  Chicago,  and  is  a  financier  of  recognized  ability  and  of 
careful  and  conservative  policies  as  is  well  proved  by  the  high  repu- 
tation ever  maintained  by  the  firm  of  which  he  is  the  executive 
head.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago 
since  the  year  1896.  He  has  also  been  an  influential  member  of  the 
Chicago  Stock  Exchange  of  which  he  was  president  for  three  con- 
secutive years,  from  1898  to  1900,  and  as  he  is  also  a  member  of  the 
New  York  Stock  Exchange  the  firm  of  Alfred  L.  Baker  &  Company 
is  representative  of  the  three  important  financial  and  commercial 
organizations  of  the  United  States.  That  Mr.  Baker  is  a  loyal,  appre- 
ciative, and  public  spirited  citizen  has  been  shown  by  his  activi- 
ties along  many  civic  avenues,  and  that  such  attitude  should  be  his 
is  but  natural  when  it  is  taken  into  consideration  that  he  is  a  scion 
of  a  family  whose  name  has  been  worthily  identified  with  the  annals 
of  American  history  since  the  early  Colonial  era.  Though  he  comes 
from  a  Boston  family  and  was  educated  in  the  state  of  Massachu- 
setts, Mr.  Baker  was  born  while  his  parents  were  sojourning  in 
Nova  Scotia,  and  the  date  of  his  nativity  was  April  30,  1859.  He  is 
the  son  of  Addison  and  Maria  (Mudge)  Baker,  and  his  father  was 
a  business  man  in  the  city  of  Boston,  where  he  was  actively  identi- 
fied with  the  canning  industry  at  the  time  of  his  death  which  oc- 
curred when  he  was  comparatively  a  young  man.  It  was  in  the 
public  schools  of  Lynn,  Massachusetts,  that  Alfred  L.  Baker  was 
educated,  graduating  from  the  high  school  of  that  city  as  a  member 
of  the  class  of  1876.  His  novitiate  in  the  work  of  business  was 
served  by  his  holding,  in  turn,  a  position  of  clerical  order  in  a  woolen 
house  and  a  boot  and  shoe  establishment,  and  finally  he  assumed 
the  position  of  private  secretary  to  the  treasurer  of  the  Amory 
&  Langdon  Manufacturing  Company,  which  then  maintained  its 


32  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

offices  in  the  old  Suffolk  Bank  Building,  on  State  street,  in  Boston. 
The  vigor,  determination  and  ambition  in  the  youth  found  signifi- 
cant exemplification  at  this  time  when  he  applied  himself  diligently 
to  the  study  of  law  during  his  evenings  and  other  leisure  time.  That 
he  fortified  himself  in  the  science  of  jurisprudence  was  shown  when, 
in  1881,  he  proved  himself  eligible  and  was  admitted  to  the  Massa- 
chusetts bar  in  Essex  county,  his  admission  to  the  bar  having  come 
to  him  when  he  was  but  twenty-two  years  of  age.  Ready  to  put 
his  professional  requirements  to  practical  test  and  utilization,  Mr. 
Baker  engaged  in  active  practice  in  Lynn,  as  junior  member  of  the 
law  firm  of  Baldwin  &  Baker  and  won  success  and  reputation  as 
an  attorney  and  counsellor.  He  also  gained  influence  in  connection 
with  the  municipal  affairs  in  the  city  of  Lynn,  where  he  served  as 
a  member  of  the  City  Council  and  also  as  a  member  of  the  School 
Committee.  The  mental  fiber  and  progressive  instincts  of  Mr.  Baker 
peculiarly  fitted  him  for  association  with  the  more  vigorous  and 
vital  West,  and  it  was  characteristic  youthful  energy  that  led  him 
to  identify  himself  with  Chicago  and  to  be  imbued  with  the  spirit 
of  the  West  when  he  was  a  young  man  of  twenty-six  years.  In 
the  autumn  of  1885,  he  established  residence  in  this  city  and  shortly 
afterwards  he  formed  a  law  partner  alliance  with  Louis  M.  Greeley 
and  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  under  the  firm  name 
of  Baker  &  Greeley.  He  achieved  definite  and  well-earned  suc- 
cess in  the  practice  of  his  profession  and  formed  a  wide  acquaint- 
anceship among  the  leading  business  men  of  the  city.  After  having 
devoted  about  ten  years  to  his  law  practice,  Mr.  Baker  showed  his 
resourcefulness  and  good  judgment  by  identifying  himself  with  the 
line  of  enterprise  in  which  it  has  been  given  him  to  obtain  success 
and  prosperity  and  a  place  of  unquestioned  influence  and  leadership 
in  the  financial  world. 

Mr.  Baker  is  entirely  a  man  of  ideas  and  ideals  and  both  are 
made  "working  propositions"  by  him  as  a  man  of  affairs,  and  as  a 
broad-minded  and  progressive  citizen.  He  is  vice-president  of  the 
National  City  Bank  and  holds  a  similar  office  with  the  Calumet 
Chicago  Canal  &  Dock  Company.  In  1907-8  he  was  president  of 
the  Board  of  Trustees  of  Lake  Forest  University,  and  in  1905  he 
held  the  presidency  of  the  Merchants'  Club  of  Chicago,  which  after- 
wards amalgamated  into  the  Commercial  Club  of  Chicago.  The 
year  1916  found  him  according  effective  service  as  Chairman  of 
the  Citizens  Terminal  Plan  Committee,  which  raised  $100,000  to 
provide  for  a  comprehensive  study  and  investigation  of  the  entire 
terminal  situation  in  Chicago,  with  a  view  to  bringing  the  facili- 
ties up  to  the  highest  possible  efficiency,  which,  like  the  Chicago 
Plan  Commission,  is  a  great  asset  in  the  future  growth  of  the  city 
of  Chicago,  and  will,  in  all  the  agencies  that  go  to  make  up  a  great 
city,  recreation,  transportation  and  home  building,  make  it  the  ideal 
city  of  the  world.     Mr.   Baker  is  identified  with   a  large  number 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  33 

of  the  representative  civic  organizations  of  his  home  city  and  his 
influence  and  co-operation  are  ever  to  be  counted  upon  in  the  fur- 
therance of  measures  tending  to  advance  the  material  and  civic 
interests  of  Chicago.  He  was  two  years  the  President  of  the  City 
Club  and  to  indicate  that  his  life  is  not  all  work,  that  he  enjoys  the 
usual  amount  of  recreation,  he  has  also  been  prominently  identified 
with  the  Onwentsia  Club  of  Lake  Forest,  of  which  he  was  Presi- 
dent for  five  years.  He  is  an  appreciative  member  of  the  Society  of 
Colonial  Wars,  of  which  he  served  as  Governor  of  the  local  Chapter 
and  further  indicates  his  appreciation  of  keeping  alive  Colonial  tra- 
ditions by  his  membership  in  the  Society  of  Mayflower  Descendants. 
He  maintains  a  residence  in  the  beautiful  suburban  district  of  Lake 
Forest  and  his  family  is  one  of  prominence  in  the  representative 
social  life  of  Chicago  and  Lake  Forest.  On  the  6th  of  June,  1894, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Baker  to  Miss  Mary  Corwith,  a 
daughter  of  the  late  Henry  Corwith  of  Chicago,  and  the  two  children 
of  this  union  are :  Isabelle,  who  was  born  in  1897,  and  Mary  Lan- 
don,  who  was  born  in  1901.  Mr.  Baker  is  a  man  of  strong  personal- 
ity and  gives  the  impression  of  force  and  initiative,  backed  by  sound 
judgment  and  comprehensive  grasp  of  any  subject  upon  which  he 
fixes  his  attention.  He  has  always  been  a  helpful  and  conservative 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  and  is  one 
of  those  who  have  aided  in  maintaining  its  reputation  for  the  very 
highest  standard  of  commercial  honor.  It  has  been  given  to  but 
few  men  to  have  a  stronger  influence  for  good  in  one  of  the  largest 
cities  of  the  world  than  Mr.  Baker  has  attained,  and  it  is  a  matter 
of  congratulation  for  the  city  that  he  has  been  willing  to  use  his 
large  abilities,  not  for  selfish  purposes  alone,  but  to  give  time  and 
attention  to  the  promotion  of  civic  welfare. 

Paul  A.  Balbach. — In  connection  with  the  important  grain 
trade  of  central  Illinois  Paul  August  Balbach  has  become  a  success- 
ful and  influential  exponent  of  this  phase  of  commercial  enterprise 
and  has  built  up  a  notably  substantial  business  in  the  handling  of 
grain  in  car  lots,  his  residence  and  office  headquarters  being  main- 
tained in  the  city  of  Pontiac,  Livingston  county,  and  his  active 
membership  in  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago  dating  from  the  year 
1909.  He  has  been  a  progressive  and  successful  exponent  of  the 
grain  commission  business  since  1904,  his  early  experience  in  con- 
nection with  practical  agriculture  making  him  an  authoritative 
judge  of  grain  values,  and  his  careful  and  honorable  methods  in  busi- 
ness having  gained  to  him  the  confidence  and  good  will  of  those 
with  whom  he  has  had  dealings.  Mr.  Balbach  is  of  the  truest  Ameri- 
can type  in  all  that  makes  for  sentiment  and  action  and  yet  he  has 
reason  for  satisfaction  in  being  a  scion  of  sterling  German  stock. 
He  was  born  on  a  farm  near  Lincoln,  Logan  county,  Illinois,  on  the 
17th  of  April,  1871,  one  of  the  eight  children  of  Paul  G.  and  Eliza- 
beth  (Gentes)  Balbach.     His  father  was  born  in  Germany,  where 


34  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

he  was  reared  and  educated  and  whence  he  came  to  the  United  States 
in  the  early  '50s.  He  engaged  in  farming  activities  in  Logan  county, 
Illinois,  and  later  he  removed  to  Saline  county.  As  a  vigorous  and 
progressive  farmer  he  achieved  independence  and  prosperity,  and  as 
a  citizen  he  ever  commanded  the  fullest  measure  of  popular  confi- 
dence and  good  will.  He  was  a  resident  of  the  latter  county  at  the 
time  of  his  death,  in  April,  1904,  and  his  widow  still  maintains  her 
home  there.  Paul  A.  Balbach  made  good  use  of  the  advantages 
afforded  in  the  public  schools  and  also  of  those  oflfered  in  connection 
with  practical  experience  in  farming.  He  continued  his  active  asso- 
ciation with  agricultural  industry  until  he  was  thirty-five  years  of 
age,  and  since  1904  he  has  been  successfully  established  in  the  grain 
commission  trade  at  Pontiac,  where  his  careful  and  conservative 
policies  have  enabled  him  to  build  up  a  substantial  and  well  ordered 
business.  He  is  a  Republican  in  his  political  allegiance,  is  affiliated 
with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  and  is 
one  of  the  liberal  and  public-spirited  citizens  of  the  little  city  that 
is  the  judicial  center  of  Livingston  county.  He  married  Miss 
Katherine  Power,  a  daughter  of  Lawrence  Power,  of  Illinois,  and 
they  are  popular  factors  in  the  social  life  of  their  home  city. 

Raymond  C.  Baldwin. — One  of  the  specially  prominent  and  im- 
portant concerns  in  the  grain  trade  in  Illinois  is  the  Baldwin  Grain 
Company,  which  centralizes  its  extensive  business  in  the  city  of 
Bloomington.  judicial  center  of  McLean  county.  Of  this  company 
Raymond  Clair  Baldwin  is  the  progressive  president  and  general 
manager,  and  of  the  same  he  is  an  active  representative  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Board  of  Trade  in  Chicago,  besides  which  he  is  similarly 
identified  with  the  Peoria  Board  of  Trade,  the  National  Grain  Deal- 
ers' Association  and  the  Illinois  Grain  Dealers'  Association.  The 
consistent  slogan  of  the  company  is  "always  in  the  market,"  and 
its  correct  policies  and  enterprising  management  have  made  it  one 
of  the  leading  factors  in  the  handling  of  Illinois  grain  in  the  south- 
western part  of  the  State.  Mr.  Baldwin  was  born  in  the  city  of 
Chicago  on  the  13th  of  May,  1879,  and  is  a  son  of  David  S.  and 
Sylvinia  M.  (Riggles)  Baldwin,  the  latter  of  whom  was  for  many 
years  a  successful  and  influential  representative  of  the  lumber  trade, 
with  which  he  continued  his  active  connection  until  his  death,  in 
1905.  In  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  Raymond  C.  Baldwin 
continued  his  studies  until  his  graduation  in  the  Oak  Park  high 
school,  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1897.  In  August  of  the  same 
year  he  found  employment  in  the  offices  of  Charles  Cunningham  & 
Company,  engaged  in  the  grain  business.  With  this  firm  he  con- 
tinued his  alliance  until  1904,  when  he  returned  to  Chicago  and 
took  a  position  with  the  Chicago  Elevator  Company.  Later  he 
entered  the  employ  of  J.  C.  Shaffer  &  Company,  a  prominent  Chi- 
cago grain  firm,  and  this  connection  was  continued  until  May   1, 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  35 

1905,  when  he  established  himself  in  the  same  line  of  business  at 
Bloomington,  his  ability  and  energy  having  been  effectively  brought 
to  bear  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  substantial  business  now  controlled 
by  the  company  of  which  he  is  president  and  general  manager.  Vig- 
orous and  well  poised  as  a  business  man,  Mr.  Baldwin  is  a  citizen 
who  takes  lively  interest  in  community  affairs  and  in  politics  he  is  a 
loyal  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party.  The  year  1917 
finds  him  giving  effective  service  as  vice-president  of  the  Blooming- 
ton  Commercial  Club  and  as  a  director  of  the  Bloomington  Club 
and  the  Bloomington  Country  Club,  he  and  his  wife  holding  mem- 
bership in  the  Christian  church  in  their  home  city.  Mr.  Baldwin 
was  married  to  Miss  Ethel  Johnson,  daughter  of  J.  T.  Johnson,  and 
she  is  a  popular  factor  in  the  social  life  of  Bloomington.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Baldwin  have  two  children,  Jeanette  A.,  who  was  born  in  1904, 
and  Robert  E.,  who  was  born  in  1907. 

Finley  Barrell. — To  give  consideration  to  those  persons  and 
concerns  that  stand  clearly  representative  in  connection  with  the 
activities  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  and  that 
have  special  and  emphatic  significance  in  maintaining  the  com- 
mercial precedence  of  the  western  metropolis,  is  the  prime  desidera- 
tum and  function  of  this  department  of  the  history  here  presented. 
From  this  viewpoint  there  is  eminent  consistency  in  according  high 
relative  tribute  to  the  firm  of  Finley  Barrell  &  Company  and  the 
able  and  popular  chief  executive  whose  name  gives  it  its  title  and 
who  has  worthily  and  effectively  won  an  impregnable  vantage- 
place  and  large  influence  in  connection  with  the  commission  trade 
in  grain,  cotton,  provisions  and  coffee,  as  well  as  in  connection  with 
stable  and  progressive  operations  in  the  handling  of  stocks  and 
bonds.  The  firm  of  Finley  Barrell  &  Company  is  one  of  the  fore- 
most to  find  representation  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  and 
controls  a  remarkably  extensive  and  substantial  business,  so  that  its 
leadership  in  its  sphere  of  operations  is  uniformly  conceded.  Much 
is  implied  in  the  achieving  of  such  distinctive  success  and  priority 
in  one  of  the  most  important  fields  of  commercial  action,  and  Mr. 
Barrell  eminently  merits  classification  among  those  men  who  have 
distinguished  themselves  by  initiative  and  constructive  ability, 
potency  in  the  mastering  of  opposing  forces  and  the  tenacity  of 
purpose  which  makes  possible  the  wresting  from  the  hands  of  fate 
a  large  measure  of  success  and  an  honorable  name.  Further  in- 
terest attaches  to  his  career  by  reason  of  his  being  a  native  son  of 
Chicago,  in  which  city  he  has  won  his  way  to  a  secure  position  and 
influential  status  as  a  citizen  and  man  of  affairs,  the  while  his  ad- 
vancement has  been  entirely  free  from  the  dubitable  elements  of 
"pride,  vain  glory  and  hypocrisy."  The  firm  of  Finley  Barrell  & 
Company  is  to  be  designated  as  one  of  the  representative  national 
concerns  in  its  field  of  enterprise,  and  it  has  direct  and  influential 
representation  not  only  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  but  also  on 


36  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

the  following  named  and  important  commercial  bodies :  The  Chi- 
cago Stock  Exchange,  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange,  the  New 
York  Cotton  Exchange,  the  New  York  Coffee  Exchange,  the  New 
York  Produce  Exchange,  the  Philadelphia  Commercial  Exchange, 
the  Baltimore  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Buffalo  Corn  Exchange, 
the  Toledo  Produce  Exchange,  the  Omaha  Grain  Exchange,  the 
St.  Louis  Merchants'  Exchange,  the  Kansas  City  Board  of  Trade, 
the  Duluth  Board  of  Trade,  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
and  the  Winnipeg  Grain  Exchange.  The  year  1916  finds  the  well 
appointed  offices  of  the  firm  established  at  203  South  La  Salle  street, 
and  the  New  York  offices  at  74  Broadway.  Finley  Barrell  was  born 
in  Chicago  on  the  28th  of  October,  1864,  and  is  a  son  of  James  and 
Susan  (Finley)  Barrell.  In  his  native  city  he  profited  duly  by  the 
advantages  afforded  in  the  public  and  high  schools  and  Allen's 
Academy.  That  he  has  achieved  his  present  commanding  place  in 
the  domain  of  grain  and  stock  commission  operations  has  not  been 
an  accident  but  rather  the  logical  result  of  long  and  varied  experi- 
ence and  well  applied  energy  and  ambition.  The  very  novitiate  of 
his  business  career  was  gained  through  his  assuming  a  clerical  posi- 
tion in  the  employ  of  the  firm  of  Irwin,  Orr  &  Company,  Board  of 
Trade  commission  merchants  in  Chicago,  and  he  was  about  eighteen 
years  of  age  when  he  thus  initiated  his  association,  in  1883,  with  the 
line  of  enterprise  in  which  he  was  destined  to  win  marked  prece- 
dence and  large  and  untainted  success.  From  1884  to  1890  he  was 
similary  employed  by  the  representative  commission  firm  of  Norton 
&  Worthington,  and  in  September  of  the  latter  year  he  found  him- 
self well  fortified  when  he  engaged  in  the  grain  commission  busi- 
ness in  an  independent  way,  as  junior  member  of  the  firm  of  Russell 
&  Barrell.  In  1892  he  assumed  full  control  of  the  business,  under 
the  title  of  J.  F.  Barrell  &  Company,  and  in  1894  his  father,  James 
Barrell,  became  a  member  of  the  firm,  whereupon  was  adopted  the 
present  title  of  Finley  Barrell  &  Company.  On  the  10th  of  April, 
1899,  his  brother,  Stewart  E.  Barrell,  was  admitted  to  partnership 
and  the  province  of  the  business  was  extended  to  include  also  the 
dealing  in  stocks,  bonds,  cotton  and  coffee.  The  personnel  of  the 
firm  was  augmented  on  the  1st  of  January,  1903,  by  the  admission  of 
David  A.  Noyes,  and  on  the  1st  of  January,  1906,  Frederick  R.  Bab- 
cock  became  a  member  of  the  firm.  On  the  1st  of  January  of  the 
following  year,  James  and  Stewart  E.  Barrell  retired,  as  did  also 
David  A.  Noyes,  and  on  the  25th  of  February,  1909,  Peter  J.  Ma- 
loney  became  one  of  the  interested  principals,  he  being  at  the  pres- 
ent time  one  of  the  resident  partners  of  the  firm  in  New  York  city 
and  still  retaining  membership  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade. 
Frederick  R.  Babcock  retired  in  1910.  The  constituent  members 
of  this  important  firm  at  the  time  of  this  writing  are  as  follows : 
Finley  Barrell,  Peter  J.  Maloney,  Benjamin  Block,  John  W.  Barrell, 
L.  M.  Stein  and  W.  B.  Anderson.    Mr.  Barrell  has  held  membership 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  37 

on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  since  the  year  1890 
and  has  exemplified  in  his  connection  therewith  and  in  his  individual 
business  career  the  admirable  commercial  ethics  for  which  this 
great  organization  has  stood  sponsor  during  the  entire  period  of 
its  long  and  admirable  history.  As  a  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen 
Mr.  Barrell  gives  his  influence  and  co-operation  in  the  furtherance  of 
those  things  which  tend  to  advance  the  best  interests  of  his  native 
city,  along  both  civic  and  material  lines,  and  in  this  connection  his 
progressiveness  has  been  shown  no  less  effectively  than  in  his  per- 
sonal business  career,  which  has  been  one  of  consecutive  advance- 
ment, with  naught  of  the  statu  quo.  His  political  allegiance  is  given 
to  the  Republican  party,  both  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the 
Protestant  Episcopal  church,  and  he  is  an  appreciative  and  valued 
member  of  the  following  named  and  representative  organizations: 
The  Chicago  Club,  the  Onwentsia  Club,  of  Lake  Forest,  111.,  and  the 
Metropolitan  and  Bankers'  Clubs  of  New  York  city.  On  the  9th  of 
December,  1890,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Barrell  to 
Miss  Grace  M.  Witbeck,  of  Chicago,  and  their  only  child  is  John 
Witbeck  Barrell. 

Elzear  A.  Beauvais. — The  Dominion  of  Canada  has  not  failed  to 
give  a  due  quota  of  able  and  successful  members  to  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  prominent  among  the  popular 
representatives  of  the  Dominion  is  Elzear  A.  Beauvais,  who  has 
maintained  his  home  in  Chicago  for  nearly  forty  years  and  who 
has  made  this  city  the  stage  of  his  business  activities  since  he  was 
a  young  man.  He  has  been  one  of  the  active  members  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  since  November,  1883,  and  has  been  one  of  its  loyal,  pro- 
gressive and  popular  representatives,  it  having  been  his  to  serve  as 
a  member  of  its  board  of  directors  from  1899  to  1902.  He  is  now 
the  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  Beauvais  &  Company,  which  con- 
trols a  general  and  extensive  commission  business  in  grain  and 
provisions,  with  offices  at  55  Board  of  Trade  Building.  Mr.  Beau- 
vais is  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  fine  old  French  families  that  was 
founded  in  the  Province  of  Quebec,  Canada,  many  generations  ago, 
and  at  La  Prairie,  that  province,  he  was  born  on  the  29th  of  March, 
1858,  a  son  of  Louis  and  Honorine  (Brossard)  Beauvais.  In  addi- 
tion to  receiving  the  advantages  of  the  parochial  and  public  schools 
of  his  native  town  he  took  a  course  of  study  in  the  high  school  at 
Peterboro,  Province  of  Ontario.  In  1881,  as  an  ambitious  young 
man  of  twenty-three  years,  Mr.  Beauvais  came  to  Chicago  and  as- 
sumed a  clerical  position  in  the  offices  of  the  grain  commission  firm 
of  Brosseau,  Booth  &  Company,  with  which  he  continued  until 
1887.  He  then  formed  a  partnership  in  the  same  line  of  business 
with  Auguste  Brosseau,  and  in  1894  he  became  one  of  the  principals 
in  the  firm  of  Z.  P.  Brosseau  &  Company.  In  this  firm  he  remained 
until  1915,  as  one  of  the  prominent  and  popular  traders  connected 
with  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  on  the  1st  of  October  of  the  year  last 


38  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

mentioned  he  organized  and  became  the  executive  head  of  the  pres- 
ent commission  firm  of  Beauvais  &  Company.  Mr.  Beauvais  is 
affiliated  with  DeSoto  Council  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  which 
he  has  served  most  efficiently  as  a  trustee,  and  he  holds  member- 
ship in  the  Canadian  Club  of  Chicago  and  the  Edgewater  Golf  Club. 
He  and  his  family  are  zealous  communicants  of  the  Catholic  church. 
On  the  22nd  of  May,  1883,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr. 
Beauvais  to  Miss  Ernestine  Bourassa,  and  of  their  eight  children 
three  sons  and  four  daughters  are  living. 

Howard  M.  Beazell. — In  September,  1916,  this  representative 
business  man  of  the  city  of  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  became  a  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  in  Chicago,  and  he  is  loyally  and  practically 
appreciative  of  the  advantages  afforded  by  this  great  commercial 
institution  of  the  western  metropolis.  As  a  broker  and  dealer  in 
high-grade  investment  securities  and  as  a  successful  exponent  of 
the  commission  trade  in  grain,  provisions,  etc.,  he  conducts  his  busi- 
ness in  an  individual  and  independent  way  and  is  one  of  the  promi- 
nent and  influential  representatives  of  these  important  lines  of 
enterprise  in  the  Queen  City  of  the  Buckeye  State.  As  a  broker 
of  stocks  and  bonds  he  handles  both  local  and  New  York  securities, 
and  he  maintains  a  direct  private  wire  from  his  offices  to  all  financial 
centers.  Mr.  Beazell  established  his  present  substantial  business 
enterprise  on  the  1st  of  March,  1902,  and  his  previous  experience 
specially  fortified  him  when  he  directed  his  energies  into  their  pres- 
ent channel,  as  he  had  been  a  valued  attache  of  the  Citizens'  National 
Bank  of  Cincinnati  for  more  than  twenty  years.  He  entered  the 
employ  of  this  staunch  financial  institution  in  1880,  won  advance- 
ment to  the  office  of  assistant  cashier,  and  continued  the  incumbent 
of  this  position  until  he  retired  to  engage  in  his  present  independent 
business.  In  addition  to  holding  membership  in  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade  he  is  similarly  allied  with  the  Cincinnati  Stock  Exchange. 
One  of  a  family  of  six  children,  Howard  M.  Beazell  was  born 
in  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  on  the  17th  of  July,  1861,  and  he  is  a  son  of  J. 
and  Elizabeth  (Smith)  Beazell,  who  continued  their  residence  in 
this  city  until  their  death.  He  to  whom  this  sketch  is  dedicated  is 
indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  for  his  early  educa- 
tional discipline,  and  after  his  course  in  the  high  school  he  identified 
himself  zealously  with  business  activities  in  Cincinnati,  where,  as 
before  noted,  he  was  an  employe  of  the  Citizens'  National  Bank  from 
1880  to  1902.  A  progressive  and  liberal  citizen  who  takes  deep 
interest  in  all  things  touching  the  well  being  of  his  native  city,  Mr. 
Beazell  has  had  no  predilection  for  political  activities  or  public 
office,  but  is  found  aligned  as  a  staunch  supporter  of  the  cause  of 
the  Republican  party.  He  is  an  appreciative  and  valued  member 
of  the  Cincinnati  Business  Men's  Club  and  the  Cincinnati  Automo- 
bile Club,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Christian  church, 
the  attractive  family  home  being  in  the  beautiful  Walnut  Hill  dis- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  39 

trict  of  Cincinnati.  Mr.  Beazell  wedded  Miss  Emma  T.  Casey, 
daughter  of  the  late  George  H.  Casey,  of  Cincinnati,  and  the  two 
children  of  this  union  are  George  H.  and  Robert  C,  both  of  whom 
are  now  associated  with  their  father's  business,  as  vigorous  and 
popular  young  business  men  of  their  native  city. 

Edwin  Beggs. — A  scion  of  one  of  the  sterling  pioneer  families 
of  Cass  county,  Illinois,  within  whose  borders  he  passed  virtually 
his  entire  life,  the  late  Charles  Edwin  Beggs  marked  the  passing 
years  with  large  and  worthy  achievement  and  became  one  of  the 
foremost  representatives  of  the  grain  business  in  his  native  state, 
though  he  was  content  to  eschew  the  attraction  of  a  metropolitan 
center  and  to  maintain  his  home  in  the  thriving  little  village  of  Ash- 
land, Cass  county,  where  his  death  occurred  January  7,  1916.  He 
was  known  and  honored  as  one  of  the  most  prominent  and  influential 
citizens  and  leading  business  men  of  central  Illinois  and  was  one  of 
the  founders  and  upbuilders  of  the  extensive  business  controlled  by 
the  Central  Illinois  Grain  Company,  of  which  he  was  president  at 
the  time  of  his  death.  Through  his  ability  and  wise  and  indefati- 
gable endeavors  he  became  one  of  the  most  substantial  capitalists  of 
the  county  in  which  he  was  born  and  reared,  and  besides  having 
been  the  sole  owner  and  operator  of  a  chain  of  thirty-three  well 
equipped  grain  elevators  through  the  state  of  lUinios  he  owned 
large  tracts  of  valuable  agricultural  land  near  his  home  town  of 
Ashland  and  was  a  citizen  whose  influence  and  ready  co-operation 
were  always  freely  given  in  the  furtherance  of  all  things  tending  to 
advance  the  civic  and  material  well-being  of  the  community.  Sig- 
nally true  and  loyal  in  all  the  relations  of  life,  broad  in  mental  ken, 
sound  in  judgment  and  with  an  exalted  sense  of  personal  steward- 
ship, Mr.  Beggs  was  a  man  who  commanded  at  all  times  the  confi- 
dence and  respect  of  his  fellow  men,  and  his  death  was  viewed  with 
a  sense  of  personal  loss  and  sorrow  by  the  community  in  which  he 
had  long  lived  and  wrought  and  to  the  advancement  of  which  he  had 
contributed  in  most  generous  measure.  Members  of  his  immediate 
family  still  reside  at  Ashland,  and  there  are  maintained  the  general 
offices  of  the  Central  Illinois  Grain  Company,  of  which  he  was 
president  at  the  time  of  his  death  and  in  the  control  of  the  large 
business  of  which  two  of  his  sons  are  now  associated,  as  are  they 
also  in  representing  the  concern  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City 
of  Chicago.  Of  the  Board  of  Trade  Mr.  Beggs  became  a  member 
many  years  ago,  and  he  continued  his  appreciative  alliance  with  the 
same  until  the  close  of  his  long  and  useful  life.  Charles  Edwin 
Beggs  was  born  on  a  pioneer  farm  near  Ashland,  Cass  county,  Illi- 
nois, on  the  22d  of  January,  1851,  and  thus  he  was  nearly  sixty-five 
years  of  age  at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  was  one  of  the  nine  chil- 
dren born  to  James  L.  and  Mary  (Ruddell)  Beggs,  both  natives  of 
Indiana.  James  L.  Beggs  was  born  in  Clark  county,  Indiana, 
November  11,  1819,  and  he  came  to  the  state  of  Illinois  on  the  17th 


40  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

of  June,  1846,  in  which  year  he  became  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers 
of  Cass  county,  where  he  continued  his  active  association  with 
agricultural  pursuits  until  his  death.  His  first  wife,  Mary  Jane, 
was  a  daughter  of  Jacob  Ward,  of  Cass  county,  Indiana ;  his  second 
wife  was  Mary  A.  Crow,  a  daughter  of  Rev.  William  Crow,  and  his 
third  wife,  mother  of  the  subject  of  this  memoir,  bore  the  maiden 
name  of  Mary  Ruddell.  Of  the  other  children  of  James  L.  Beggs 
the  following  brief  data  are  available:  S.  Ella  was  born  June  12, 
1840;  Lucy  J.  was  born  October  13,  1853;  Emma  R.  was  born 
March  11,  1855;  William  C.  was  born  September  10,  1857;  John  L. 
was  born  December  13,  1858,  and  died  May  10,  1900;  George  H.  was 
born  February  8,  1863,  and  died  June  24,  1908;  Abraham  L.  was 
born  October  4,  1865 ;  and  James  died  December  22,  1889.  Charles 
E.  Beggs  was  reared  to  the  sturdy  discipline  of  the  pioneer  farm  and 
he  was  afforded  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools  of  Cass  county. 
Though  he  never  abated  his  appreciation  of  the  basic  industry  of 
agriculture  and  became  one  of  its  prominent  exponents  in  his  native 
state,  the  major  part  of  his  active  career  was  marked  by  his  close 
and  successful  identification  with  the  grain  business,  of  which,  as 
before  stated,  he  became  one  of  the  most  prominent  exponents  in 
the  central  part  of  his  native  state.  His  integrity  and  honesty  com- 
bined with  his  fine  administrative  ability  to  make  him  the  ideal  man 
of  affairs,  he  stood  four  square  to  every  wind  that  blows  and  there 
rests  no  shadow  on  any  portion  of  his  record  as  a  loyal  citizen  and 
a  remarkably  successful  business  man.  In  the  Central  Illinois 
Grain  Company  his  sons  Frank,  Edwin  and  John  V.  are  ably  up- 
holding the  prestige  of  the  family  name  and  are  prominent  and 
valued  business  men  of  Cass  county,  with  residence  and  business 
headquarters  at  Ashland,  their  native  town.  They  now  control  and 
operate  sixteen  grain  elevators. 

Mr.  Beggs  was  a  staunch  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the  Re- 
publican party  and  though  he  had  no  desire  for  political  office  he 
was  emphatically  progressive  and  public-spirited  in  his  civic  atti- 
tude. 

As  a  young  man  Mr.  Beggs  wedded  Miss  Emma  Beggs,  and 
after  her  death  he  married  Miss  Jessie  Wilson,  who  survived  him 
and  now  resides  with  her  sons  John  and  Frank  at  the  old  home.  He 
was  an  earnest  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  was 
instant  in  kindly  thoughts  and  kindly  deed,  thus  examplifying  his 
Christian  faith  in  good  works.  Of  his  sons  Frank  E.  and  John  V. 
are  directors  of  the  Central  Illinois  Grain  Company,  of  which  the 
latter  is  assistant  secretary ;  and  George  E.,  who  is  a  civil  engineer 
by  profession,  is  now  a  member  of  the  faculty  of  Princeton  Uni- 
versity. Of  the  daughters  Mary  G.,  is  a  teacher  of  domestic  science 
in  New  York  city;  Edistina  is  the  wife  of  Henry  McKeown,  of 
Beardstown,  Illinois ;  Lutie,  is  attending  a  leading  educational  in- 
stitution in  the  city  of  Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania;  and  Virginia  is  a 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  41 

student  at  Lake  Forest,  Illinois,  and  the  eldest  daughter  Nelle  is 
doing  missionary  work  in  China  as  Principal  of  the  RuHson-Fish 
Memorial  School  in  Kiukiang,  Kiangsi,  China. 

James  E.  Bemiett. — In  the  commission  business  in  grain,  pro- 
visions and  stocks  Mr.  Bennett  has  proved  himself  one  of  the 
vigorous  and  resourceful  figures  in  connection  with  the  ponderous 
activities  that  are  centered  in  Chicago,  and  the  firm  of  which  he  is 
the  head  is  one  of  the  steadfast,  prominent  and  influential  concerns 
represented  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  his  membership  in  which  great 
commercial  body  had  its  inception  in  the  year  1894,  and  which 
organization  he  has  served  as  director  and  member  of  its  Appeals 
Committee  and  Arbitration  Committee.  James  Ewing  Bennett  was 
born  in  the  city  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  on  the  3d  of  April,  1871,  and 
is  a  son  of  Thomas  and  Jennie  (Ewing)  Bennett,  who  established 
their  residence  in  Chicago  in  the  year  1882,  the  father  having  here 
become  a  prominent  and  successful  exponent  of  the  brokerage  trade 
in  grain  and  provisions.  He  whose  name  initiates  this  review 
acquired  his  earlier  educational  discipline  in  the  public  schools  of 
St.  Louis  and  Chicago,  and  efifectively  supplemented  this  by  a 
course  in  the  Chicago  Manual  Training  School,  in  which  he  was 
graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1890.  In  the  following  year 
he  began  his  novitiate  in  connection  with  business  afifairs,  by  enter- 
ing the  employ  of  the  West  Seattle  Street  Railway  Company,  of 
Seattle,  Washington.  With  this  corporation  he  continued  his  serv- 
ice until  1893,  when  he  returned  to  Chicago  and  assumed  a  position 
in  the  offices  of  the  brass  foundry  of  Bennett  &  Johnson,  but  in  the 
following  year  he  became  associated  with  the  grain  and  provision  ■ 
commission  firm  of  Thomas  Bennett  &  Company,  of  which  his 
father  was  the  head.  With  characteristic  vigor  and  ambition  he 
gave  his  attention  to  gaining  commanding  information  concerning 
the  manifold  details  of  this  important  line  of  commercial  enterprise, 
and  thus  he  was  well  fortified  when,  after  the  death  of  the  father, 
in  1900,  he  became  sole  proprietor  of  the  business  developed  by  this 
firm.  He  individually  continued  the  business  until  the  1st  of  Janu- 
ary, 1909,  when  a  reorganization  was  efifected  and  the  present  firm 
title  of  James  E.  Bennett  &  Company  was  adopted.  Mr.  Bennett 
has  worthily  won  and  maintained  high  reputation  and  success  in  his 
chosen  sphere  of  endeavor  and  is  one  of  the  valued  and  highly 
esteemed  representatives  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  He  holds  active 
membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic  and  the  South  Shore  Country 
Clubs.  April  8,  1902,  recorded  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Bennett  to  Miss 
Bertha  Bogue,  of  Chicago. 

Matthew  D.  Benzaquin. — In  November,  1915,  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade  gained  as  one  of  its  members  the  vigorous  and  pro- 
gressive grain  brokerage  and  commission  merchant  whose  name 
introduces  this  paragraph,  and  who  is  one  of  the  prominent  and  in- 
fluential exponents  of  this  important  line  of  commercial  enterprise 


42  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

in  the  city  of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  with  offices  at  109  Chamber 
of  Commerce.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Grain  Dealers'  National  Asso- 
ciation and  the  Boston  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  virtually  his 
entire  business  career  has  been  marked  by  close  association  with 
the  grain  business  in  its  commercial  phases,  so  that  he  has  gained 
authoritative  knowledge  concerning  all  details  of  this  line  of  enter- 
prise, and  is  one  of  the  progressive  business  men  of  the  younger 
generation  in  the  metropolis  of  the  Bay  state.  Mr.  Benzaquin  was 
born  in  Boston  on  the  18th  of  May,  1879,  and  is  a  son  of  David  and 
Hester  (Bennett)  Benzaquin,  his  father  having  long  been  a  prosper- 
ous cigar  manufacturer  in  this  city  and  still  continuing  his  active 
connection  with  business  affairs.  After  duly  availing  himself  of 
the  advantages  of  the  public  schools  Matthew  D.  Benzaquin  prose- 
cuted a  higher  course  of  academic  study  in  Hanover  College,  and  in 
this  institution  he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Arts.  In  1887,  he  assumed  a  clerical  position  in  the  office  of  the 
well  known  grain  brokerage  firm  of  B.  K.  Reed  &  Company,  and 
he  continued  his  alliance  with  the  same  for  more  than  twenty  years, 
within  which  he  advanced  to  specially  confidential  and  responsible 
executive  position,  the  while  he  gained  most  comprehensive  and 
accurate  knowledge  of  the  business  in  all  of  its  ramifications  and 
thus  was  admirably  fortified  when,  in  the  autumn  of  1909,  he  en- 
gaged independently  in  the  same  line  of  enterprise,  in  which  his 
success  has  been  of  unequivocal  order.  He  is  a  Republican  in 
politics,  a  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen  and  an  able  and  pro- 
gressive business  man  who  commands  the  confidence  and  good  will 
of  those  with  whom  he  has  come  in  contact  in  the  various  relations 
of  a  signally  active  and  successful  career.  Both  he  and  his  wife 
are  members  of  the  Unitarian  church  and  the  family  home  is  in  the 
beautiful  suburb  of  Brookline.  Mr.  Benzaquin  wedded  Miss  Bessie 
L.  Quimby,  a  daughter  of  George  Quimby,  of  Boston,  and  the  one 
child  of  this  union  is  Robert  B. 

Watson  Franklin  Blair. — In  preparing  a  review  of  the  careers 
of  prominent  men  in  connection  with  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  none  are  more  worthy  of  mention  in  a  work  of 
this  character  than  Watson  F.  Blair,  for  many  years  an  active 
member  of  the  organization,  and  one  of  the  city's  most  conserva- 
tive financiers.  He  has  not  only  achieved  notable  success  in  busi- 
ness, but  is  a  leading  light  in  the  social  and  charitable  life  of  the 
city,  and  his  progressive  spirit  is  evident  in  many  ways.  He  came 
to  Chicago  when  he  was  young;  he  has  grown  up  with  the  city 
and  has  helped  to  make  it  grow,  and  he  typifies  to  the  fullest  extent 
the  real  Chicago  spirit.  Mr.  Blair  was  born  in  Michigan  City, 
Indiana,  January  29,  1854,  a  son  of  Chauncey  B.  and  Caroline  O. 
(DeGrofT)  Blair,  and  comes  of  a  long  line  of  prominent  New  Eng- 
land ancestry  of  Scoth-Irish  lineage,  which  dates  back  to  the 
colonial  epoch  in  American  history.     The  progenitor  of  the  family 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  43 

in  this  country  was  Robert  Blair,  of  County  Antrim,  Ireland,  who 
settled  in  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  about  1718,  and  the 
line  of  descent  is  as  follows:  Robert  (I.),  Robert  (II.).  Rufus 
(III.),  Samuel  (IV.),  Chauncey  B.  (V.)  and  Watson  F.  (VI.). 
The  name  of  Blair  has  long  been  identified  with  the  industrial  and 
financial  development  of  Chicago,  Chauncey  B.  Blair,  father  of  our 
subject,  being  a  leading  factor  in  the  financial  life  of  the  city  for 
many  years,  while  his  sons  have  developed  along  the  same  line, 
and  are  all  men  of  large  aflfairs.  After  completing  his  education  at 
Willeston  Seminary,  East  Hampton,  Massachusetts,  Watson  F. 
Blair  began  his  business  career  in  the  packing  house  of  Culbertson, 
Blair  &  Co.,  of  this  city,  and  remained  with  that  firm  until  its  dis- 
solution in  1876.  The  following  year  he  embarked  in  a  grain  com- 
mission business  under  the  title  of  Blair  &  Co.,  and  for  thirteen 
years  was  one  of  the  active  and  successful  operators  on  the  Board 
of  Trade,  having  become  a  member  of  the  organization  in  1876. 
In  1890  he  retired  from  active  operation  on  the  Board  in  order  to 
give  more  time  to  the  investment  of  his  capital  and  the  furtherance 
of  the  various  interests  with  which  he  is  identified,  though  he 
remained  a  member  until  February  17,  1915.  During  his  identifi- 
cation with  the  Board  of  Trade  his  knowledge  of  grain  and  con- 
servative dealing  commanded  the  respect  and  confidence  of  every 
cash  grain  firm  in  the  trade,  and  his  name  in  connection  with  any 
transaction  was  considered  a  guarantee  for  straightforward  and 
honorable  dealing.  A  man  of  unusual  public  spirit,  interested  in 
local  affairs  and  proud  of  the  city  in  which  much  of  his  active  and 
mature  manhood  has  been  passed,  Mr.  Blair  is  a  powerful  factor 
in  the  furtherance  of  any  measure  which  has  for  its  aim  the 
advancement  of  the  people  or  the  betterment  of  existing  condi- 
tions. He  is  Vice-President  of  the  Children's  Memorial  Hospital, 
and  for  many  years  has  been  a  generous  contributor  to  that  insti- 
tution. He  is  also  Vice-President  of  the  Field  Museum  of  Natural 
History,  and  is  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  modern  improve- 
ments along  material,  intellectual  and  moral  lines.  He  was  a 
Director  in  the  Merchants  National  Bank  for  several  years  prior 
to  its  consolidation  with  the  Corn  Exchange  National  Bank,  in 
1903,  and  since  that  date  has  been  a  director  in  the  latter  institu- 
tion. He  has  always  been  deeply  interested  in  Chicago's  welfare, 
and  at  all  times  his  sympathy  and  support  have  been  with  the 
measures  that  in  any  way  benefit  the  Western  Metropolis.  A  man 
of  strong  convictions  of  what  is  right  and  wrong,  he  is  unfaltering 
in  his  opposition  to  a  course  which  he  deems  inimical  to  the  best 
interests  of  the  country  and  people,  and  is  entirely  fearless  of 
criticism  and  public  opinion  when  he  believes  he  is  right.  On 
November  15,  1883,  Mr.  Blair  was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss 
Alice  Rose  Keep,  of  Chicago,  a  woman  of  exceptional  mental 
capacity  and  much  beauty  of  character.    Her  parents,  William  and 


44  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Frances  A.  (Rhoades)  Keep,  were  both  worthy  representatives  of 
prominent  old  New  York  state  famiHes  and  were  pioneers  of  Chi- 
cago. To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Blair  have  been  born  four  children: 
Beatrice,  Alice  Rose,  Watson  Keep  and  Wolcott,  the  first  two  of 
whom  are  deceased.  For  many  years  Mr.  Blair  and  his  family 
have  spent  considerable  time  in  Europe,  but  maintain  their  resi- 
dence at  720  Rush  Street,  Chicago.  Aside  from  his  business  asso- 
ciations he  has  long  been  a  leading  factor  in  social  life,  and  is 
identified  with  many  of  the  leading  clubs  of  Chicago,  New  York, 
and  also  of  Europe.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Chicago,  Chicago  Golf, 
Onwentsia,  Chicago  Athletic,  and  the  Saddle  and  Cycle  clubs  of 
Chicago,  the  Union,  Metropolitan,  New  York  Yacht,  Brook  and  the 
Automobile  Clubs  of  New  York,  the  Hurlingham  Club  and  the 
Royal  Thames  Yacht  Club  of  London,  England,  and  the  Travelers 
Club  of  Paris,  France.  He  was  founder  of  the  National  Golf  Links  of 
America.  Both  at  home  and  abroad  he  is  recognized  as  a  man  of 
earnest  purpose  and  progressive  principles,  and  his  friends,  who 
are  legion,  entertain  for  him  the  warmest  regard. 

Herbert  J.  Blum. — Associated  with  Gardiner  B.Van  Ness  in  the 
commission  and  brokerage  business,  Herbert  James  Blum  has 
status  as  one  of  the  vigorous  and  popular  younger  members  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  his  native  city  and  is  distinctly  eligible  for  spe- 
cific representation  in  this  publication.  He  was  born  in  Chicago 
on  the  29th  of  December,  1881,  and  is  a  son  of  August  and  Edith 
(Bromfield)  Blum.  His  early  educational  advantages  included  not 
only  those  of  the  public  schools  but  also  of  Armour  Institute,  and 
on  the  1st  of  July,  1897,  about  six  months  prior  to  his  sixteenth 
birthday  anniversary,  he  assumed  the  post  of  messenger  boy  in 
the  Union  National  Bank.  When  this  institution  was  absorbed  by 
the  First  National  Bank  Mr.  Blum  continued  in  the  employ  of  the 
latter  and  won  advancement  through  efficient  service.  He  con- 
tinued his  connection  with  this  great  Chicago  financial  institution 
until  1906,  on  the  23d  of  August  of  which  year  he  became  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  associated  himself  with  the  sub- 
stantial commission  business  conducted  by  Gardiner  B.  Van  Ness, 
with  whom  he  has  since  maintained  this  effective  alliance.  January 
1,  1917,  the  newly  incorporated  house  of  the  Gardiner  B.  Van  Ness 
Company  began  business  with  Mr.  Blum  as  Vice-President  and 
Treasurer.  Mr.  Blum  has  always  taken  an  active  and  loyal  interest 
in  the  welfare  and  the  advancement  of  the  great  commercial  insti- 
tution, in  which  he  has  membership,  and  at  the  annual  election  of 
the  Board  of  Trade,  January  9,  1917,  he  was  elected  a  Director 
for  a  period  of  three  years.  On  the  5th  of  July,  1905,  was  recorded 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Blum  to  Miss  Hazel  Rose,  and  they  have  one 
child,  Janet  Pattison  Blum. 

William  B.  Bogert — It  has  been  within  the  province  of  Mr. 
Bogert  to  have  maintained  active  association  with  the  Board  of 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  4S 

Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  for  more  than  thirty  years,  and  that 
he  has  been  influential  in  its  affairs  needs  no  further  voucher  than 
the  statement  that  he  served  as  a  member  of  its  Directorate  from 
1897  to  1899  and  that  he  was  chairman  of  its  Executive  Committee 
in  1898-9.    By  careful,  energetic  and  well  ordered  operations  he  has 
long  held  precedence  as  one  of  the  successful  and  representative 
figures  in  the  grain  commission  trade  in  Chicago,  and  his  activities 
have  included  also  a  general  brokerage  in  provisions,  cotton  and 
stocks.    William  Benezet  Bogert  is  a  scion  of  a  sterling  old  colonial 
family  in  America,  the  lineage  on  the  paternal  side  tracing  back 
to  the  staunch  Holland  Dutch  stock,  and  a  definite  pride  may  be 
his  in  the  historic  distinction  reflected  upon  him  through  the  service 
of  his  ancestors  in  the  early  colonial  wars  as  well  as  the  war  of 
the  Revolution.     Mr.  Bogert  was  born  in  the  city  of  Providence, 
Rhode  Island,  on  the  2d  of  October,  1860,  and  in  his  native  city 
he  was  graduated  in  Brown  University,  as  a  member  of  the  class 
of  1882.     In  the  same  year  he  engaged  in  the  cotton  manufactur- 
ing business  at  Taftville,  Connecticut,  where  he  remained  until  1884, 
when  he  disposed  of  his  business  interests  in  the  east  and  estab- 
lished his  home  in  Chicago.    Here  he  became  one  of  the  principals 
in  the  commission  firm  of  Carrington,  Patten  &  Co.,  and  incidentally 
formed  forthwith  an  active  alliance  with  the  Board  of  Trade,  of 
which  he  has  continued  a  loyal  and  honored  member  during  the 
long  intervening  years.     After  severing  his  association   with   the 
firm  mentioned  he  became  the  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  Bogert, 
Maltby  &  Co.,  brokers  in  grain,  provisions,  stocks  and  cotton,  and 
after  the  business  had  expanded  to  such  proportions  as  to  make 
expedient   its   incorporation,   under   the  original   title,   Mr.    Bogert 
became  President  of  the  company.    This  office  he  continued  to  hold 
many  years,  since  which  time  he  has  continued  his  commission  oper- 
ations in  an  independent  way  and  with  the  attendant  success  that 
has  marked  his  entire  career  since  he  became  identified  with  this 
important  line  of  commercial  enterprise.     Mr.  Bogert  is  an  appre- 
ciative member  of  the  Chicago  chapter  of  the  Society  of  the  Sons 
of  the   Revolution,  of  which  he  has  served  as   president,  and  he 
is  also  an  active  member  of  the  Society  of  Colonial  Wars.     He  is  a 
member  of  the  Union  League  Club  of  Chicago,  of  which  he  was 
a   Director  from    1909  to    1911,  and  he  holds   membership   in   the 
Chicago     Athletic     Club,     the      Evanston      Country     Club,      the 
Glen    View    Club,    and    the    University    Club    of    Evanston,    of 
which  last  mentioned  organization  he  served  as  President  in  1906-7 
and  in   1910-11.     In  June,   1887,   was  solemnized   the  marriage  of 
Mr.   Bogert  to  Miss   Ella    Loomis,  of   Springfield,   Massachusetts, 
and  the  three  children  of  this  union  are:     William   Benezet,  Jr., 
Theodore  Loomis  and  Frances  Hoyt.     Mrs.  Bogert  died  December 
25,  1909,  and  on  January  7,  1914,  Mr.  Bogert  was  united  in  mar- 
raige  with  Caroline  Woods,  of  Louisville,  Kentucky. 


46  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Alfred  V.  Booth. — It  has  been  given  to  Alfred  Vernon  Booth 
to  gain  more  than  incidental  prominence  and  influence  in  con- 
nection with  the  operations  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  as  a  repre- 
sentative of  the  commission  business  in  grain  and  provisions.  He 
has  been  an  active  and  popular  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since 
1889,  and  has  since  1892  been  independently  engaged  in  business 
as  a  broker  in  grain  and  provisions,  besides  which  he  has  special 
prestige  as  the  principal  broker  in  memberships  on  the  great  com- 
mercial organization  with  which  he  is  thus  identified.  He  is  the 
executive  head  of  the  representative  commission  firm  of  A.  V. 
Booth  &  Co.,  and  in  his  chosen  field  of  commercial  enterprise  his 
success  has  been  on  a  parity  with  his  recognized  ability  and  his 
inviolable  integrity  of  purpose.  Alfred  Vernon  Booth  was  born  in 
the  city  of  Dubuque,  Iowa,  on  the  25th  of  May,  1865,  and  is  a  son 
of  Sidney  and  Anna  (Porch)  Booth.  He  was  a  boy  at  the  time  of 
the  family  removal  to  San  Francisco,  California,  where  he  acquired 
his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  and  where  in  his  youth 
he  initiated  his  business  career  by  assuming  the  position  of  purser 
on  a  steamer  operated  by  the  California  Transportation  Company. 
About  one  year  later,  in  1883,  when  eighteen  years  of  age,  Mr. 
Booth  came  to  Chicago  and  entered  upon  his  novitiate  in  connec- 
tion with  the  grain  commission  business.  He  began  as  a  mes- 
senger boy  in  the  employ  of  the  firm  of  Brosseau,  Booth  &  Co., 
and  thereafter  his  progressive  steps  in  connection  with  this  line  of 
enterprises  were  marked  by  his  association  in  turn  with  W.  S. 
Booth  &  Co.,  John  W.  Hepburn  &  Co.,  H.  G.  Gaylord  &  Co.  and 
C.  A.  Wyland  &  Co.  In  1893  Mr.  Booth  established  himself  in  an 
independent  business  as  a  broker,  and  for  a  number  of  years  he 
gave  special  attention  to  business  of  the  long-time  privilege  order. 
In  May,  1901,  he  became  the  head  of  the  present  prominent  and 
important  commission  firm  of  A.  V.  Booth  &  Co.,  which  maintains 
offices  in  both  Chicago  and  Milwaukee,  and  which  controls  a  large 
and  substantial  business  of  the  best  order.  As  a  loyal  and  public- 
spirited  citizen  of  well  fortified  convictions,  Mr.  Booth  gives 
staunch  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party ;  he  and  his  wife  are 
communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church,  and  he  holds 
membership  in  the  South  Shore  Country  Club  and  the  Swan  Lake 
Club.  On  the  12th  of  October,  1892,  in  the  city  of  Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Booth  to  Miss  Ada 
Bercry,  and  they  have  one  son,  Alfred  Bercry  Booth. 

Henry  Botsford. — No  slight  distinction  is  that  pertaining  to 
Mr.  Botsford  in  connection  with  the  history  and  operations  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  for  he  is  now  one  of  its 
oldest  living  members,  his  association  with  this  great  commercial 
organization  having  had  its  inception  in  1858,  when  its  vigorous 
little  company  of  members  could  have  had  slight  prescience  of  the 
marvelous  advancement   and   great   influence   it   was   destined   to 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  47 

wield  in  one  of  the  greatest  cities  of  the  world.  Mr.  Botsford  has 
passed  the  age  of  four  score  years,  but  his  mental  and  physical 
vigor  gives  denial  to  this  fact,  and  he  is  one  of  the  venerable  and 
honored  citizens  and  veteran  men  of  affairs  in  the  western  metrop- 
olis, and  is  one  of  those  whose  virile  powers  have  been  potent  in 
the  furtherance  of  civic,  commercial  and  industrial  development 
and  progress  in  the  city  that  has  been  his  home  and  the  stage  of 
his  fruitful  activities  for  more  than  sixty  years  and  in  which  he 
gained  special  prominence  and  definite  success  in  connection  with 
the  meat-packing  industry.  With  this  line  of  enterprise  he  became 
identified  in  1863,  and  the  conditions  obtaining  during  the  further 
progress  of  the  Civil  War  made  the  business  specially  successful. 
For  a  period  of  fully  forty  years  Mr.  Botsford  continued  as  one 
of  the  prominent  and  influential  representatives  of  the  great  pack- 
ing industry  centered  in  Chicago,  and  in  this  city  his  capitalistic 
interests  at  the  present  time  are  large  and  varied.  Mr.  Botsford 
reverts  to  the  Wolverine  State  as  the  place  of  his  nativity,  and 
is  a  representative  of  one  of  the  sterling  pioneer  families  of  that 
favored  commonwealth.  He  was  born  at  Ann  Arbor,  Washtenaw 
county,  Michigan,  the  seat  of  the  great  University  of  Michigan, 
and  the  date  of  his  birth  was  July  30,  1834.  He  was  afforded  good 
educational  advantages  in  his  youth  and  in  1855,  shortly  after 
attaining  his  legal  majority,  he  came  to  Chicago.  For  the  first 
three  years  he  gave  his  attention  principally  to  the  buying  of  grain 
in  the  country  districts,  and  mostly  for  the  Chicago  market. 
Gradually  he  expanded  the  scope  of  his  operations  and  in  1858 
he  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  His  activities  were 
virtually  confined  to  the  grain  trade  until  1863,  when,  as  previously 
noted,  he  engaged  in  the  packing  of  hogs.  Thus  he  is  to  be  con- 
sistently designated  not  only  as  a  pioneer  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  but  also  in  connection  with  the  great  meat-packing  indus- 
try that  has  been  one  of  the  most  important  elements  in  furthering 
the  commercial  precedence  of  this  city.  His  business  career  has 
been  in  all  stages  marked  by  discrimination,  due  conservatism 
and  impregnable  integrity,  and  thus  he  naturally  holds  high 
place  as  one  of  the  veteran  business  men  and  honored  citizens  of 
Chicago. 

Joseph  H.  Bourassa. — On  the  6th  of  January,  1894,  Joseph 
Hubert  Bourassa  assumed  the  prerogatives  of  active  membership 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  he  has  since 
continued  as  one  of  the  progressive  and  successful  of  the  grain 
commission  trade  in  the  western  metropolis.  He  is  a  scion  of  fine 
old  French  ancestry  and  was  born  at  LaPrairie,  Province  of 
Quebec,  Canada,  on  the  12th  of  October,  1872,  a  son  of  Alexander 
and  Marie  (Brosseau)  Bourassa.  He  acquired  his  early  education 
in  the  parochial  and  public  schools  of  his  native  province,  and  in 
1888  was  graduated  in  a  well  ordered  commercial  college  in  the 


48  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

city  of  Montreal.  Thereafter  he  held  a  clerical  position  in  a  lead- 
ing banking  institution  in  Montreal  until  1891,  when  he  came  to 
Chicago  and  associated  himself  with  the  well-known  grain  broker- 
age firm  of  Brosseau  &  Co.,  with  which  he  continued  his  alliance 
until  1900.  He  then  formed  a  partnership  with  Auguste  Brosseau, 
under  the  firm  title  of  J.  H.  Brosseau  &  Co.,  and  since  1915  he  has 
been  actively  associated  with  Beauvais  &  Co.,  which  controls  a 
large  and  successful  general  commission  business  in  grain.  Mr. 
Bourassa  is  a  popular  and  appreciative  member  of  the  Chicago 
Athletic  Club  and  the  Edgewater  Golf  Club,  and  his  religious  faith 
is  that  of  the  Catholic  church,  in  which  he  was  reared.  On  the 
31st  of  July,  1905,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Bourassa 
to  Miss  Minnie  Peters  Clark,  of  Chicago.  They  have  no  children. 
Benjamin  W.  Bradley. — On  the  1st  of  May,  1885,  one  month 
after  the  anniversary  of  his  twenty-second  birthday,  Mr. 
Bradley  was  made  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  and  during  the  long  intervening  years  he  has 
maintained  a  worthy  prestige  as  one  of  the  able  and  successful 
traders  actively  concerned  with  the  operations  of  this  great  and 
representative  commercial  organization.  On  the  Board  he  has 
efficiently  represented  the  firms  of  Culver  &  Co.  and  C.  B.  Congdon 
&  Co.  in  former  years,  and  he  is  at  the  present  time  a  member  of 
the  well  known  commission  and  brokerage  firm  of  Hulburd,  War- 
ren &  Chandler,  the  interests  of  which  he  handles  on  the  Board 
of  Trade,  the  offices  of  this  representative  firm  being  at  208  South 
LaSalle  Street.  Mr.  Bradley  claims  the  State  of  Wisconsin  as  the 
place  of  his  nativity  and  is  a  scion  of  one  of  its  sterling  pioneer 
families.  He  was  born  at  Brodhead,  Green  county,  that  State,  on 
the  1st  of  April,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of  William  W.  and  Marilla  A. 
(Taft)  Bradley,  who  removed  to  Chicago  when  he  was  about  nine 
years  of  age,  the  greater  part  of  the  active  career  of  his  father 
having  been  as  a  contractor  associated  with  early  growth  of  Engle- 
wood.  Benjamin  W.  Bradley  was  afforded  the  advantages  of  the 
public  schools  of  Englewood,  and,  as  indicated  in  a  preceding  para- 
graph, he  has  been  concerned  with  the  brokerage  business  since 
his  youth.  He  has  gained  and  retained  a  high  place  in  the  con- 
fidence and  good  will  of  the  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  the 
while  he  stands  forth  as  a  man  who  is  loyal  to  its  traditions  and 
ideals  and  appreciative  of  the  functions  which  it  exercises  in  the 
domain  of  commerce  and  finance.  He  has  been  identified  with 
the  firm  of  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Co.  since  1905  and  is  essentially 
one  of  the  able  and  representative  members  of  the  great  organiza- 
tion to  which  this  publication  is  dedicated  and  devoted.  Mr.  Brad- 
ley holds  membership  in  the  Hamilton  Club,  one  of  the  representa- 
tive civic  organizations  of  the  western  metropolis,  and  also  in  the 
Flossmor  Club  and  the  South  Shore  Country  Club.  On  the  2d 
of  August,  1887,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Bradley  to 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  49 

Miss  Margaret  M.  McKelvey,  and  they  reside  at  5529  Hyde  Park 
Boulevard. 

Bernard  G.  Brennaru — The  instinct  and  capacity  for  progres- 
sive achievement  have  been  significantly  shown  forth  in  the  career 
of  the  President  of  the  Brennan  Packing  Company,  and  this  execu- 
tive head  of  one  of  the  large  and  important  industrial  and  commer- 
cial enterprises  represented  in  connection  with  the  operations  that 
have  given  Chicago  a  foremost  position  in  the  packing  and  pro- 
vision trade  of  the  world,  is  he  who  figures  as  the  subject  of  this 
brief  review.  It  is  not  within  the  assigned  province  of  this  pub- 
lication to  enter  into  details  concerning  the  ramifications  and 
influential  activities  represented  by  the  Brennan  Packing  Company, 
but  it  may  be  consistently  stated  that  this  concern  is  one  of  the 
representative  institutions  of  the  packing  and  provision  trade  that 
has  its  world  center  in  the  city  of  Chicago,  and  that  its  President 
has  advanced  to  his  present  position  of  prominence  in  the  domain 
of  industrial  and  commercial  enterprise  by  the  assertion  of  the 
powers  of  a  vigorous,  resourceful  and  versatile  personality.  His 
character  and  his  accomplishment  give  him  high  place  among  the 
captains  of  industry  of  the  great  western  metropolis,  and  as  he 
has  been  an  appreciative  and  valued  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
since  1907  he  is  well  entitled  to  recognition  in  this  history.  Mr. 
Brennan  was  born  at  Sparta,  Monroe  county,  Wisconsin,  in  the 
year  1864,  and  is  a  son  of  James  and  Mary  Brennan.  In  his  native 
state  he  gained  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  and  there 
he  was  associated  with  the  basic  industry  of  farming  from  his  youth 
until  his  ambition  and  resolute  purpose  opened  for  him  the  way  to 
broader  activities  and  more  notable  achievement.  Mr.  Brennan 
has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago  since  1883,  and  he  has  been  the  man 
of  judgment,  energy  and  progressiveness  through  whose  efforts 
largely  has  been  developed  the  extensive  and  prosperous  com- 
mercial enterprise  now  controlled  by  the  company  of  which  he  is 
President.  He  is  one  of  the  broad-gauged,  loyal  and  public-spirited 
citizens  of  Chicago,  and  his  genial  personality  has  gained  to  him 
a  circle  of  friends  that  is  virtually  limited  only  by  that  of  his 
acquaintances.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Club,  the  South 
Shor^  Country  Club,  the  Saddle  and  Sirloin  Club,  and  the  Beverly 
Golf  Club.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  earnest  communicants  of  the 
Catholic  church.  On  the  15th  of  July,  1913.  was  solemnized  the 
marriage  of  Mr.  Brennan  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Grace,  and  they  have 
two  children,  namely :     Bernard  T.  and  Rosemary. 

John  E.  Brennan. — As  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Brennan  & 
Garden,  engaged  in  the  general  grain  commission  business,  Mr. 
Brennan  is  one  of  the  representative  younger  exponents  of  this 
important  line  of  enterprise  in  his  native  city  and  is  giving  his 
attention  exclusively  to  the  cash  grain  trade.  He  whose  name 
initiates  this  paragraph  is  one  of  the  appreciative  and  active  mem- 


50  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

bers  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  on  which  he  has  held  a  seat  since  1905, 
and  he  is  now  serving  as  a  member  of  the  Appeals  Committee  of 
the  great  commercial  body  to  which  this  work  is  devoted.  Mr. 
Brennan  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the  1st  of  May,  1880,  and  is  a  son 
of  Patrick  and  Catherine  Brennan.  After  having  availed  himself 
of  the  advantages  of  St.  Joseph  parochial  school  he  pursued  a  higher 
course  of  study  in  St.  Ignatius  College,  one  of  the  leading 
Catholic  educational  institutions  of  his  native  city.  He  has  been 
identified  with  the  grain  commission  business  from  the  inception 
of  his  active  career,  and  has  become  one  of  the  able  and  repre- 
sentative figures  in  the  cash  grain  business  incidental  to  the  opera- 
tions of  the  Board  of  Trade.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Knights  of 
Columbus,  and  both  he  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the 
Catholic  church.  On  the  23d  of  June,  1909,  was  solemnized  the 
marriage  of  Mr.  Brennan  to  Miss  Catherine  E.  Moore,  and  they 
have  three  children:  Catherine  Dorothy,  Ruth  Mary  and  John 
E.,  Jr. 

Patrick  Brennan. — Among  those  whose  able  and  progressive 
activities  have  contributed  primarily  to  giving  Chicago  precedence 
as  the  world's  great  center  of  the  packing  and  provision  industry, 
a  place  of  due  relative  priority  must  be  given  to  the  sturdy,  vigor- 
ous and  representative  captain  of  industry  whose  name  initiates 
this  paragraph  and  whose  large  and  worthy  success  stands  as  the 
concrete  voucher  for  his  energy,  good  judgment  and  progressive- 
ness.  Mr.  Brennan  is  by  nature  and  judgment  an  optimist,  and 
during  the  long  years  of  a  significantly  earnest,  active  and  success- 
ful business  career  he  has  never  lost  his  buoyancy  and  democracy 
of  spirit,  which  have  not  only  tended  to  conserve  his  advancement 
and  success  but  which  also  have  conspired  to  gain  to  him  a  host  of 
staunch  and  valued  friends.  He  is  one  of  those  indomitable  per- 
sons to  whom  success  comes  as  a  natural  prerogative,  and  his 
advancement  in  the  world  has  been  won  entirely  through  his  own 
ability  and  well  ordered  endeavors.  He  has  been  concerned  with 
the  activities  of  the  Union  Stock  Yards  of  Chicago  for  nearly  forty 
years,  and  soon  his  ambition  and  determination  led  him  into  inde- 
pendent operations  that  were  to  lead  him  onward  to  the  goal  of 
definite  prosperity  and  large  influence  in  connection  with  the  indus- 
trial and  commercial  lines  of  enterprise  of  which  he  is  now  a  promi- 
nent exponent  at  the  Stock  Yards,  where  he  is  President  of  the 
Independent  Packing  Company,  one  of  the  important  concerns  at 
that  great  hive  of  industrial  enterprise.  His  active  identification 
with  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  has  continued  since 
1913,  and  in  the  same  his  circle  of  friends  is  limited  only  by  that 
of  his  acquaintances,  for  his  character  and  record  of  achievement 
have  given  him  secure  vantage  place  as  one  of  the  representative 
men  of  affairs  in  the  great  western  metropolis.  Patrick  Brennan 
was  born  in  County  Mayo,  Ireland,  on  the  4th  of  May,  1861,  and 


» 


C_^/^-!^^^t.,<=-/  I 


j 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  51 

is  a  son  of  James  and  Mary  (Flannery)  Brennan.  He  was  about 
three  years  old  at  the  time  of  his  parents'  immigration  to  the  United 
States,  and  the  family  home  was  established  in  Sparta,  Wisconsin, 
where  he  was  reared  to  adult  age  and  where  he  gained  his  early 
education  in  the  parochial  and  public  schools.  In  1878,  when  about 
seventeen  years  of  age,  this  ambitious  young  son  of  the  fair  Emerald 
Isle,  found  employment  at  the  Union  Stock  Yards  in  Chicago,  and 
it  may  consistently  be  said  that  his  progress  as  a  man  of  affairs 
has  kept  pace  with  the  development  and  growth  of  this  splendid 
industrial  institution  that  has  had  much  to  do  with  the  civic  and 
commercial  advancement  of  Chicago.  Within  a  short  time  Mr. 
Brennan  proved  his  self-reliance  and  ambitious  purpose  by  draw- 
ing forth  from  the  lines  of  mere  employes  to  test  his  powers  as  a 
dealer  in  live  stock.  He  proved  versatile  and  resourceful  in  his 
operations  along  this  line  and  his  activities  gradually  and  substan- 
tially expanded  in  scope  and  importance  with  the  passing  years. 
In  1897  Mr.  Brennan  effected  the  establishing  of  a  well-equipped 
slaughter  house  and  minor  packing  house  by  organizing  the 
National  Provision  Company,  which  soon  assumed  a  prominent 
place  in  connection  with  the  operation  at  the  Stock  Yards  and 
which  had  developed  a  large  and  important  business  at  the  time 
when  its  plant  was  totally  destroyed  by  fire,  in  the  summer  of 
1904.  Mr.  Brennan,  who  had  been  the  executive  head  of  the  con- 
cern, has  not  an  iota  of  the  fiber  that  makes  discouragement  an 
incident  of  disaster,  and  he  forthwith  girded  himself  for  the  win- 
ning of  greater  and  more  important  victories  in  his  chosen  sphere 
of  endeavor.  He  at  once  brought  about  the  organization  of  the 
Independent  Packing  Company,  of  which  he  has  since  continued  the 
President,  and  which  under  his  vigorous  control  has  gained  place 
among  the  large  and  important  concerns  represented  in  the  pon- 
derous activities  of  the  Union  Stock  Yards.  In  the  analysis  of  the 
career  of  Mr.  Brennan  interpretation  follows  fact  in  a  straight  line 
of  derivation,  and  there  can  be  no  conjecturing  as  to  the  reasons  for 
or  causes  of  his  success.  He  has  won  through  hard  work,  close 
application  and  effective  commanding  of  the  forces  with  which  he 
has  had  to  do,  and  he  is  one  of  those  strong  and  democratic  men  who 
have  not  only  compelled  but  also  merited  success.  With  naught  of 
desire  and  with  no  time  to  enter  the  turbulence  of  practical  poli- 
tics, or  to  seek  official  preferment,  Mr.  Brennan  has  never  failed 
in  his  manifestation  of  distinctive  civic  loyalty  and  public  spirit 
and  has  given  his  political  allegiance  to  the  Democratic  party. 
Reared  in  the  faith  of  the  great  mother  of  Christendom,  he  is 
a  communicant  of  the  Catholic  church,  as  is  also  his  wife,  and  among 
the  representative  civic  organizations  with  which  he  is  identified 
may  be  noted  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  the  South  Shore  Country 
Club  and  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club.  On  the  9th  of  February, 
1882,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Brennan  to  Miss  Annie 


52  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

M.  Boggie,  of  Chicago,  and  of  their  ten  children  nine  are  living: 
John,  Patrick,  Mary  L.  (who  entered  the  convent  and  is  now  Sister 
Mary  of  Mount  Carmel  of  the  order  of  the  Good  Shepherd), 
Thomas  V.,  Edward,  Clement,  Raymond,  Mary  R.  and  Joseph  J. 
Edward  L.  Brewster. — More  than  half  a  century  ago  there 
came  from  the  state  of  New  York  to  Chicago  an  ambitious,  ener- 
getic and  well  fortified  young  man  who  was  destined  to  win  through 
his  well  ordered  endeavors  a  large  measure  of  success  and  prestige 
in  connection  with  the  business  activities  of  the  future  metropolis  of 
the  west.  That  youth  was  the  late  Edward  Lester  Brewster,  who 
was  at  the  time  of  his  death  one  of  the  representative  bankers  and 
brokers  of  Chicago  and  who  had  long  wielded  much  influence  in 
the  financial  and  commercial  circles  of  the  great  city  that  became 
his  home  when  it  was  little  more  than  an  overgrown  village.  He 
kept  pace  with  and  aided  in  the  development  and  upbuilding  of 
Chicago,  was  a  steadfast,  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen,  and  was 
for  many  years  an  active  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  so  that 
his  name  merits  place  on  its  roll  of  honor  and  he  is  worthy  of 
definite  and  appreciative  tribute  in  this  history.  At  the  time  of  his 
death,  which  occurred  March  21,  1911,  Mr.  Brewster  was  a  special 
partner  in  the  banking  and  brokerage  firm  of  Russell,  Brewster  & 
Company,  and  was  a  director  of  the  Commonwealth  Edison  Com- 
pany. Edward  L.  Brewster  was  born  at  Brockport,  Monroe  county, 
New  York,  on  the  22d  of  June,  1842,  and  was  a  lineal  descendant 
of  Elder  William  Brewster,  the  historic  leader  of  the  Pilgrims  who 
first  colonized  in  New  England.  Mr.  Brewster's  parents,  Frederick 
William  and  Jeanette  (Downs)  Brewster,  passed  their  entire  lives 
in  the  state  of  New  York,  and  in  the  schools  of  his  native  place  he 
acquired  his  early  educational  discipline,  which  included  a  course 
of  study  in  the  Brockport  Collegiate  Institute.  At  the  age  of  fifteen 
years  he  obtained  employment  as  clerk  in  a  drygoods  store  and 
about  a  year  later  he  left  his  native  town  and  removed  to  the  city 
of  Buffalo,  where  he  obtained  a  clerical  position  in  the  leading 
insurance  agency  of  the  place  and  period.  In  the  experience  gained 
in  this  connection  he  fortified  himself  for  greater  responsibilities 
and  in  the  meanwhile  he  further  manifested  his  ambitious  purpose 
by  taking  a  course  in  a  commercial  college  at  Buffalo.  Concerning 
his  career  in  Chicago  a  most  effective  estimate  is  given  in  a  sketch 
of  his  life  that  appears  in  the  History  of  Chicago  and  Its  Builders, 
issued  by  the  S.  J.  Clarke  Publishing  Company,  and  the  data  touch 
so  closely  the  history  of  the  Board  of  Trade  as  well  as  denote  so 
well  the  activities  of  Mr.  Brewster,  that  it  is  but  consistent  to  make 
somewhat  liberal  quotation  from  the  article  mentioned ;  though 
paraphrase  will  be  indulged  as  well  as  incidental  elimination  :  "Well 
equipped  in  practical  and  theoretical  education,  Mr.  Brewster  had 
no  difficulty  in  securing  employment  on  his  arrival  in  Chicago,  in 
November,  1860.     His  first  engagement  was  in  the  banking  house 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  S3 

of  Edward  L.  Tinkham  &  Company,  and  from  that  day  on  Mr. 
Brewster  was  either  directly  or  indirectly  identified  with  the  bank- 
ing interests  of  Chicago  until  the  close  of  his  long  and  worthy  life. 
During  the  eight  years  following  the  discontinuance  of  the  banking 
business  of  the  concern  just  noted,  Mr.  Brewster  was  variously 
employed,  finally  becoming  a  clerk  in  the  Third  National  Bank, 
where  he  remained  two  years.  In  January,  1868,  he  became  asso- 
ciated with  Samuel  P.  Farrington  in  establishing  the  wholesale 
grocery  house  of  Farrington  &  Brewster.  This  business  was  suc- 
cessful, and  though  heavy  losers  in  the  great  fire  of  1871,  the  firm 
paid  every  dollar  of  its  obligations  at  maturity  and  continued  the 
business  as  before.  On  July  1,  1872,  Mr.  Brewster  retired  from  the 
firm  to  engage  in  a  general  banking  and  brokerage  business.  He 
organized  the  firm  of  Wrenn  &  Brewster,  which  developed  a  pros- 
perous business,  successfully  weathered  the  great  financial  panic 
of  1873  and  which  continued  operations  until  January,  1876,  when 
it  was  dissolved.  Mr.  Brewster  immediately  opened  a  new  office 
and  continued  independently  in  the  same  line  of  operations.  From 
this  time  on  he  grew  in  public  favor  as  a  judicious  and  thoroughly 
reliable  financier.  Prosperity  came  to  him  as  a  natural  sequence, 
so  that  he  was  enabled  to  absorb  the  Chicago  business  of  Gwrynne 
&  Day  of  New  York,  bankers,  in  1883.  Charles  C.  Yoe  was  ad- 
mitted to  partnership,  and  the  business  was  thereafter  conducted 
under  the  firm  name  of  Edward  L.  Brewster  &  Company.  Mr. 
Brewster  was  an  influential  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  with 
which  he  became  thus  identified  in  1873,  and  in  1881  he  became  a 
member  of  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange.  He  was  one  of  the 
principal  promoters  and  a  charter  member  of  the  Chicago  Stock 
Exchange,  was  for  many  years  a  member  of  its  Governing  Com- 
mittee and  was  at  one  time  its  President.  Mr.  Brewster  became  a 
stockholder  in  many  of  the  large  enterprises,  banks  and  corporations 
in  and  about  Chicago,  but  uniformly  declined  a  place  as  Director  of 
any  of  these  except  the  Commonwealth  Edison  Company,  the  larg- 
est corporation  of  its  kind  in  the  world.  The  firm  of  Edward  L. 
Brewster  &  Company  continued  to  expand  the  scope  and  importance 
of  its  business  from  year  to  year  until  it  ranked  among  the  foremost 
of  similar  concerns  in  the  west.  In  July,  1904,  upon  Mr.  Brewster's 
retirement  from  active  business,  the  firm  of  Edward  L.  Brewster  & 
Company  was  succeeded  by  Russell,  Brewster  &  Company,  Edward 
P.  Russell,  long  a  partner  in  the  old  firm,  and  the  only  surviving 
son,  Walter  S.  Brewster,  are  with  C.  L.  Peniston,  the  principals  in 
the  firm  that  continues  the  important  business  of  which  the  father 
was  a  founder."  Edward  L.  Brewster  was  identified  with  an  ap- 
preciable number  of  the  leading  clubs  of  Chicago,  and  among  the 
more  noteworthy  of  those  on  whose  rolls  his  name  appeared  may  be 
mentioned  the  Chicago  Club,  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club,  the  old 
Calumet  Club,  and  Washington  Park  Club,  and  also  the  Union 


S4  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

League  and  Metropolitan  Clubs  of  New  York  city.  On  the  12th  of 
November,  1866,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Brewster  to 
Miss  Mary  Niles,  daughter  of  Hiram  Niles,  of  Buffalo,  New  York. 
Of  the  six  children  of  this  union  only  two  are  living,  Walter  Stanton 
Brewster,  of  the  firm  of  Russell,  Brewster  &  Company;  and  Mrs. 
I.  Newton  Perry.  Walter  S.  Brewster  was  graduated  in  Yale  Uni- 
versity in  1895,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  and  is  proving 
an  able  successor  of  his  father  in  the  banking  and  brokerage  busi- 
ness in  Chicago.  He  is  a  member  of  both  the  Chicago  and  the  New 
York  Stock  Exchanges  and  is  one  of  the  representative  business 
men  of  the  city  that  has  represented  his  home  during  his  entire  life 
thus  far. 

Louis  C.  Brosseau. — A  son  of  Zenophile  P.  Brosseau,  an  hon- 
ored figure  in  the  operations  of  the  Board  of  Trade  for  many  years 
and  one  of  whom  specific  mention  is  made  on  other  pages  of  this 
work,  Louis  Charles  Brosseau  has  well  upheld  the  high  reputation 
of  the  family  name  in  connection  with  the  grain  commission  busi- 
ness in  his  native  city  and  also  as  a  vital  and  popular  representative 
of  the  younger  contingent  of  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  He 
is  serving  as  a  director  of  this  great  commercial  organization  in 
1916,  and  his  popularity  and  influence  are  further  indicated  by  the 
fact  that  he  is  serving  simultaneously  as  a  member  of  the  com- 
mittees on  real  estate,  legal  advice,  violation  of  rules,  inspection, 
and  members'  rates.  In  his  activities  as  a  broker  and  prominent 
representative  of  the  commission  trade  he  is  one  of  the  interested 
principals  in  the  firm  of  Brosseau  &  Company.  Mr.  Brosseau  was 
born  in  Chicago  on  the  26th  of  June,  1886,  and  is  a  son  of  Zenophile 
P.  and  Elizabeth  L.  Brosseau.  His  educational  advantages  were  of 
the  best  order,  as  is  evidenced  by  the  fact  that  he  received  from 
St.  Ignatius  College,  Chicago,  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts  and 
in  1907  was  graduated  from  historic  old  Harvard  University,  from 
which  likewise  he  received  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  It  is  in- 
teresting to  record  that  in  1916  he  was  Vice-President  of  the  Har- 
vard Club  of  Chicago,  and  that  previously  he  had  served  as  secre- 
tary of  this  representative  social  and  fraternal  organization,  in  1911, 
1912  and  1914.  He  is  actively  identified  also  with  the  University 
Club  of  Chicago  and  the  Edgewater  Golf  Club,  both  he  and  his  wife 
being  communicants  of  the  Roman  Catholic  church.  On  the  26th 
of  April,  1913,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Brosseau  to  Miss 
Helen  Elizabeth  Geraghty,  of  Chicago. 

Zenophile  P.  Brosseau. — The  honored  subject  of  this  memoir 
was  one  of  the  veteran  and  influential  members  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  at  the  time  of  his  death,  and  during  the  long  period  of  his  resi- 
dence in  Chicago  he  stood  exponent  of  the  finest  type  of  loyal  citi- 
zenship, as  a  man  of  superior  intellectuality  and  distinc- 
tive business  acumen.  His  name  was  given  place  on  the 
roster    of    members    of    the     Board    of    Trade     for    more     than 


':r^ 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  SS 

half  a  century,  and  we  was  the  founder  of  the  still  ex- 
istent firm  of  Brosseau  &  Co.,  the  substantial  commission 
business  of  which  has  been  continued  since  his  death  by  Leonard  A. 
and  Louis  Charles  Brosseau.  A  scion  of  fine  old  French  lineage, 
Mr.  Brosseau  possessed  in  marked  degree  the  gracious  courtesy  and 
consideration  so  typical  of  the  race  from  which  he  sprung,  and, 
alert  and  buoyant  of  mind,  he  expressed  in  his  personality  the  courtly 
and  dignified  gentleman  of  the  ancient  regime.  He  came  to  Chicago 
in  the  year  1860  and  in  the  following  year  became  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  so  that  he  was  consistently  to  be  designated  as  one 
of  its  pioneer  representatives  at  the  time  of  his  demise,  after  he 
had  passed  the  psalmist's  span  of  three  score  years  and  ten.  Mr. 
Brosseau  was  born  at  La  Prairie,  Province  of  Quebec,  Canada,  in 
October,  1840,  and  was  a  son  of  Louis  and  Marguerite  (Sainte 
Marie)  Brosseau,  representatives  of  old  and  honored  families  of  that 
province.  In  the  schools  of  his  native  place  Mr.  Brosseau  acquired 
his  early  education,  which  was  later  broadened  in  an  effective  way 
by  his  self-application  and  by  the  experiences  of  a  signally  active  and 
successful  life.  When  he  was  fifteen  years  of  age  he  went  to  the 
State  of  New  York,  where  he  found  employment  in  a  mercantile 
establishment  at  Malone,  Franklin  County.  He  continued  his  resi- 
dence in  the  Empire  State  until  1860,  when,  as  an  ambitious  youth 
of  twenty  years,  he  came  to  Chicago,  where  he  identified  himself 
with  the  business  activities  of  the  community,  the  population  of 
the  city  having  been  at  that  time  little  more  than  one  hundred 
thousand.  In  the  year  1861  he  enrolled  himself  as  a  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade,  and  he  became  one  of  the  successful  operators 
in  the  grain  business,  in  which  he  continued  his  activities  until  the 
city  met  disaster  and  all  lines  of  business  were  disrupted  by  the  ever 
memorable  fire  of  1871.  He  manifested  the  spirit  of  courage  and 
determination  that  proved  so  pervading  and  influential  in  bringing 
about  the  rehabilitation  of  the  prostrated  city,  and  he  kept  pace 
with  its  development  and  progress  toward  the  goal  of  great  metro- 
politan importance.  He  was  the  founder  of  the  commission  firm 
of  Brosseau  &  Co.  and  continued  his  active  identification  with  the 
same  until  the  close  of  his  long  and  useful  life,  with  inviolable  van- 
tage place  in  the  confidence  and  good  will  of  the  members  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  the  splendid  commercial  body  in  whose  upbuilding 
he  gave  effective  co-operation.  The  political  allegiance  of  Mr. 
Brosseau  was  given  to  the  Democratic  party,  and  he  was  a  broad- 
minded  and  progressive  citizen  who  took  deep  interest  in  all  things 
pertaining  to  the  wellbeing  of  the  city  of  his  adoption.  He  held 
membership  in  a  number  of  distinguished  French  organizations, 
having  been  Officier  du  Merite  Agricole ;  Chevalier  de  la  Legion 
d'Honneur ;  Officier  d'Academie,  in  France ;  and  he  served  as  Presi- 
dent of  the  Societe  de  Bienfaisance  des  Illinois,  as  well  as  rendering 
similar  service  with  I'Alliance  Frangaise.     He  took  special  interest 


56  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

in  literature  and  was  an  avidious  student  and  reader,  besides  whicli 
he  was  called  upon  to  serve  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trustees 
of  the  Chicago  Public  Library,  of  which  he  was  President  for  some 
time.  He  held  membership  in  such  representative  civic  organiza- 
tions as  the  Chicago  Club,  the  Iroquois  Club,  and  the  Chicago,  the 
Edgewater  and  the  Glen  View  Golf  Clubs. 

Mr.  Brosseau  married  Elizabeth  Leonard,  in  1881,  and  they 
became  the  parents  of  eight  children :  Mrs.  Arthur  J.  Amberg, 
Louis  C,  Joseph  E.,  Leonard  A.,  Genevieve,  Louise,  Pierre  and 
Marion.  He  was  a  member  of  Our  Lady  of  Mount  Carmel  Catholic 
Church.  Louis  C.  Brosseau  was  elected  a  Director  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  in  1916  and  is  one  of  the  young  and  active  members  of  the 
organization. 

Benjamin  R.  Brown. — For  virtually  a  quarter  of  a  century 
Benjamin  Richard  Brown  has  been  an  active  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  of  his  native  city,  and  since  1908  he  has  conducted  a  suc- 
cessful independent  business  as  a  commission  merchant,  his  opera- 
tions being  more  largely  in  the  dealing  in  corn.  His  success  in  his 
individual  enterprise  along  this  line  has  not  been  a  matter  of  acci- 
dent but  has  its  basis  on  the  solid  foundation  of  broad  and  diversi- 
fied experience  in  connection  with  the  activities  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  and  association  with  representative  factors  in  the  commission 
trade.  He  has  proved  a  most  appreciative  and  loyal  member  of  the 
splendid  commercial  organization  with  which  this  history  has  to  do, 
has  held  a  seat  on  the  board  since  the  year  1892  and  has  served  on 
its  arbitration  committee,  as  well  as  on  the  committee  on  appeals. 
He  is  known  to  his  fellow  members  as  a  careful  and  resourceful 
trader  in  the  corn  pit,  has  high  standing  in  the  sphere  of  business 
in  which  he  operates  and  is  fully  entitled  to  representation  in  this 
publication.  Mr.  Brown  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the  10th  of  Novem- 
ber, 1871,  and  thus  made  his  advent  into  the  world  shortly  after  his 
native  city  had  been  severely  tried  in  the  crucible  of  the  great  fire 
of  that  year.  He  is  a  son  of  John  and  Selina  Elizabeth  (Dewes) 
Brown,  who  came  from  England  and  established  their  home  in 
Chicago  in  the  year  1868,  the  father  here  becoming  the  founder  of 
the  Star  Chemical  Works,  of  which  he  continued  the  executive  head 
for  more  than  twenty  years.  He  became  one  of  the  representative 
business  men  of  the  western  metropolis  and  here  his  death  occurred 
in  1891.  His  widow  passed  away  in  1900.  Of  their  elder  son,  George 
D.,  who  is  one  of  the  well  known  and  influential  members  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  individual  mention  is  made  on  other  pages  of  this 
work.  Benjamin  R.  Browm  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  of 
Chicago  for  his  early  educational  discipline  and  at  the  age  of  fifteen 
years  he  initiated  his  association  with  the  grain  commission  trade, 
by  entering  the  employ  of  his  brother,  George  D.,  for  whom  he  be- 
came settling  clerk  in  connection  with  the  latter's  operations  on  the 
Board  of  Trade.     Later  he  was  associated  with  D.  E.  Sibley  and 


GEORGE  D.  BROW  N 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  57 

after  severing  this  connection  he  formed  an  alliance  with  the  firm 
of  Fowler  &  Sterling.  In  1899  he  was  admitted  to  partnership  in 
the  business  of  this  firm,  the  title  of  which  was  thereupon  changed 
to  W.  H.  Sterling  &  Company.  Mr.  Brown  continued  his  identifica- 
tion with  this  concern  until  1908,  since  which  time  he  has  conducted 
an  independent  commission  trade,  one  that  has  been  developed  to 
substantial  proportions  and  involves  the  retention  of  a  representa- 
tive and  appreciative  clientele.  Mr.  Brown  and  his  wife  are  com- 
municants of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church  and  though  he  has 
had  no  desire  to  enter  the  arena  of  practical  politics  he  has  mani- 
fested his  civic  loyalty  and  his  interest  in  public  affairs  by  according 
allegiance  to  the  Republican  party.  On  the  2d  of  June,  1904,  was 
solemnized  his  marriage  to  Miss  Corra  E.  Elliott,  of  Chicago,  and 
they  maintain  their  home  at  3451  West  Jackson  boulevard. 

George  D.  Brown. — A  native  of  England,  George  Dewes  Brown 
was  a  lad  of  twelve  years  at  the  time  when  the  family  came  to  the 
United  States  and  established  a  home  in  Chicago.  In  the  great 
western  metropolis  he  was  reared  to  man's  estate,  and  that  he  has 
become  thoroughly  animated  with  the  progressive  spirit  which  has 
marked  the  history  of  the  city  has  been  demonstrated  in  his  career 
as  a  representative  of  the  grain  commission  trade  and  as  an  active 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  Mr.  Brown  became  associated 
with  the  grain  trade  in  Chicago  shortly  after  the  great  fire  of  1871, 
and  he  may  properly  be  considered  at  the  present  time  as  one  of 
the  veteran  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  upon  which  he  has 
held  a  seat  since  1879.  George  Dewes  Brown  was  born  at  Appleby, 
Leicestershire,  England,  on  the  7th  of  March,  1856,  and  is  a  son 
of  John  and  Selina  Elizabeth  (Dewes)  Brown,  both  representatives 
of  sterling  old  families  of  that  section  of  the  "tight  little  isle."  In 
his  native  town  he  was  afforded  the  advantages  of  the  Appleby 
Grammar  School,  an  institution  of  exceptionally  high  standard, 
and,  as  previously  intimated,  he  was  twelve  years  of  age  when,  in 
1868,  the  family  came  to  America  and  made  a  new  home  in  Chicago. 
Here  his  father,  a  skilled  chemist  of  wide  experience,  engaged  in 
business  by  founding  the  Star  Chemical  Works,  which  he  developed 
into  one  of  the  substantial  concerns  of  its  kind  in  the  western 
metropolis,  and  as  executive  head  of  which  he  continued  for  many 
years.  After  his  retirement  from  business  John  Brown  continued 
his  residence  in  Chicago  until  his  death,  in  1891,  his  widow  sur- 
viving him  until  1900.  In  Chicago  George  D.  Brown  continued 
for  a  short  time  his  studies  in  the  public  schools,  and  he  then  initi- 
ated his  business  career  by  accepting  employment  with  the  Chicago 
Journal,  and  later  he  became  associated  with  Horace  Burton,  an 
extensive  and  well-known  commission  merchant,  who  induced  the 
young  newspaper  man  to  accept  a  position  in  his  employ.  Here 
young  Brown  initiated  his  activities  and  gained  his  first  experience 
in  the  actual  dealings  and  transactions  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and 


58  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

his  mental  grasp  combined  with  his  energy  and  resourcefulness 
enabled  him  to  profit  fully  by  the  experience  thus  acquired.  Later 
he  became  associated  with  the  late  G.  P.  Comstock,  another  of  the 
early  and  influential  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  this  alli- 
ance continued  until  1875,  when  he  became  a  valued  factor  in  con- 
nection with  the  extensive  operations  of  the  commission  firm  of 
Nichols  &  Helmer,  the  title  of  which  concern  was  later  changed 
to  M.  S.  Nichols  &  Co.  During  the  years  of  this  earlier  experience 
he  had  been  trading  upon  the  Board  of  Trade  under  the  provisions 
and  privileges  of  what  is  known  as  a  clerk's  ticket  and  as  a  repre- 
sentative of  the  various  firms  with  which  he  had  been  identified. 
His  ambition,  however,  urged  him  into  a  broader  and  more  inde- 
pendent field  of  activity,  and  in  1879  he  purchased  a  personal  mem- 
bership on  the  Board  of  Trade.  He  was  thus  well  fortified  when 
he  established  himself  in  business  as  an  independent  trader  in  1883. 
Mr.  Brown  has  made  a  specialty  of  the  corn  trade,  and  is  recognized 
as  one  of  the  leading  traders  in  the  corn  pit  of  the  Board.  The  civic 
loyalty  of  Mr.  Brown  is  of  the  same  insistent  type  as  that  denoting 
him  as  a  business  man,  and  though  he  has  had  no  desire  to  enter 
the  turbulence  of  practical  politics  and  holds  himself  independent 
of  strict  partisan  lines,  he  gives  in  a  generic  way  his  allegiance  to 
the  Republican  party.  He  holds  membership  in  the  Glen  View 
Golf  Club,  and  both  he  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the 
Protestant  Episcopal  church,  their  home  for  many  years  having 
been  maintained  at  850  Lawrence  avenue.  In  1881  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Brown  to  Miss  Isabella  A.  Marks,  a  native  of 
the  city  of  Portland,  Maine. 

Frederick  F.  Bullen. — The  vital  American  spirit  finds  its  apoth- 
eosis in  Chicago,  and  it  is  but  in  natural  sequence  that  the  great 
western  metropolis  should  have  drawn  to  itself  men  of  the  maxi- 
mum energy,  ambition  and  initiative,  and  a  mere  lad  whose  insistent 
but  worrying  visions  and  ambition  led  him  to  seek  Chicago  as  a 
field  for  the  achieving  of  independence  and  success  has  developed 
into  the  resourceful  and  dominating  personality  of  the  loyal  and 
representative  citizen  whose  name  initiates  this  paragraph  and 
who  has  here  found  ample  scope  and  opportunity  for  the  gaining 
of  results  that  far  transcend  the  ambition  of  his  youth.  As  a  ver- 
itable captain  of  industry  he  has  made  his  way  forward  and  his 
activities  have  extended  into  other  than  the  local  field,  especially  in 
connection  with  the  malting  and  distilling  industries.  He  has  been 
a  liberal,  progressive  and  popular  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade  since  1885,  has  been  in  the  most  significant  sense  the  artificer 
of  his  own  fortune  and  is  consistently  accorded  recognition  in  this 
publication.  On  a  farm  near  the  little  village  of  Delaware,  Middle- 
sex County,  Province  of  Ontario,  Canada,  Frederick  F.  Bullen  was 
born  on  the  25th  of  November,  1853,  a  son  of  William  F.  and  Anna 
(Muller)    Bullen,  the  former  of  whom  was  born  in   Dorsetshire, 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  59 

England,  and  the  latter  in  Ireland.  The  marriage  of  the  parents 
was  solemnized  in  England  and  within  a  short  time  thereafter 
they  severed  the  old  home  ties  to  establish  a  home  in  America, 
which  was  to  them  a  veritable  land  of  promise,  in  which  lay  the 
castle  of  their  dreams  and  hopes.  They  voyaged  to  the  New  World 
on  an  old-time  sailing  vessel  and  established  themselves  as  pioneers 
in  Middlesex  County,  Ontario,  where  the  father  turned  his  attention 
to  agricultural  pursuits,  the  old  homestead  being  situated  near  the 
village  of  Delaware,  on  the  picturesque  Thames  River.  William  F. 
Bullen  had  received  excellent  educational  advantages  in  his  native 
land  and  became  a  man  of  broad  intellectual  ken.  His  training  had 
included  preparation  for  the  legal  profession,  and  in  Ontario  he 
finally  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law,  in  which  he  attained  to 
marked  success  and  distinction.  He  became  one  of  the  prominent 
men  and  influential  citizens  of  Middlesex  County  and  served  many 
years  on  the  bench  of  the  County  Court.  Secure  in  the  high  regard 
of  all  who  knew  him.  Judge  Bullen  and  his  devoted  wife  passed 
the  closing  years  of  their  lives  in  the  city  of  London,  Ontario,  and 
each  attained  to  venerable  age.  Frederick  F.  Bullen  was  signally 
favored  in  being  reared  in  a  home  of  distinctive  culture  and  refine- 
ment, and  his  early  experiences  were  those  gained  in  connection 
with  the  activities  of  the  home  farm,  the  attending  of  the  district 
school  and  the  reception  of  parental  counsel  and  instruction  on  the 
part  of  his  accomplished  father  and  gracious  and  cultured  mother. 
As  previously  intimated,  his  boyish  ambition  found  its  course  far 
afield  from  the  little  rural  village  and  the  activities  of  the  rural 
community  in  which  he  was  reared,  and  with  him  ambition  has  ever 
been  that  of  courage  and  action.  In  search  of  the  boon  of  oppor- 
tunity, Mr.  Bullen  left  the  parental  roof  and  came  to  Chicago  when 
he  was  a  lad  of  but  fourteen  years.  Concerning  this  climacteric 
stage  in  his  career  the  following  pertinent  statements  have  been 
written,  and  they  are  well  worthy  of  perpetuation  in  this  connec- 
tion: "He  at  once  became  permeated  with  the  wonderful  spirit 
of  optimism  that  has  made  possible  the  building  of  the  wonderful 
metropolis  on  the  shores  of  Lake  Michigan,  and  the  very  conditions 
and  influences  which  compassed  him  in  this  formative  period  of  his 
character-building  fanned  into  flame  the  constructive  ability  which 
became  a  fixed  attribute  of  his  afterlife  and  made  possible  his 
many  successes  in  the  initiation  and  development  of  new  indus- 
tries." Soon  after  his  arrival  in  Chicago  Mr.  Bullen  found  employ- 
ment in  connection  with  the  malting  industry,  and  his  vigorous 
mind  enabled  him  to  profit  largely  by  his  experience  and  to  take  full 
advantage  of  every  opportunity  which  presented.  As  has  been  con- 
sistently said,  "his  first  employment  resulted  in  opening  for  him  a 
vast  field  of  endeavor  and  in  the  fixing  of  a  belief  in  certain  prin- 
ciples in  reference  thereto  that  he  has  since  insistently  followed, 
with  the  result  that  through  his  influence  many  important  changes 


60  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

and  improvements  have  been  brought  about  in  modern  methods  of 
malting."  In  the  spring  of  1872  Mr.  Bullen  entered  into  partnership 
with  his  brother  George  and  the  late  William  Lill,  under  the  title 
of  the  Lill  &  Bullen  Malting  Company,  and  they  built  up  a  large 
and  prosperous  business,  with  which  he  continued  his  connection 
until  1888,  when  the  same  was  sold  to  an  English  syndicate.  In  the 
following  year  Mr.  Bullen  elTected  the  organization  of  the  Fred- 
erick F.  Bullen  Malting  Company,  and  this  corporation  continued 
to  receive  the  impress  of  his  dominating  and  vigorous  influence 
until  its  business  and  material  properties  were  acquired  by  the 
American  Malting  Company,  in  1896.  While  actively  concerned 
with  the  development  and  upbuilding  of  the  prosperous  business 
enterprises  just  noted,  Mr.  Bullen  had  extended  his  operations  in 
connection  with  the  malting  industry,  of  which  he  became  one  of 
the  leading  exponents  in  the  West.  His  association  with  this  line 
of  enterprise  has  involved  heavy  interests  at  other  places  than  Chi- 
cago, as  may  be  understood  when  it  is  noted  that  he  became  Presi- 
dent of  a  substantial  malting  company  at  Red  Wing,  Minnesota, 
where  he  built  and  equipped  a  fine  malting  plant,  and  also  one  of 
the  leading  principals  in  the  Winona  Malting  Company,  at  Winona, 
that  State.  Apropos  of  his  venture  into  still  another  field  the  fol- 
lowing pertinent  account  has  been  written:  "Mr.  Bullen  was  one 
of  the  promoters  and  organizers  of  the  Merchants'  Distilling  Com- 
pany, of  Terre  Haute,  Indiana.  This  was  the  first  distilling  com- 
pany known  to  the  trade  as  an  'independent,'  and  in  this  connection 
also  Mr.  Bullen  put  into  execution,  both  in  manufacturing  and  in 
the  business  management,  principles  of  sterling  integrity  and  fair 
dealing  such  as  had  characterized  all  of  his  operations.  Incident- 
ally, because  of  the  enforcement  of  some  ideas  and  methods  at 
variance  with  established  custom,  a  vigorous  fight  of  extermination 
was  for  a  time  waged  against  the  new  company,  but  Mr.  Bullen  was 
found  to  be  an  unyielding  antagonist  and  finally  won  recognition 
as  a  fair,  honest  and  esteemed  competitor."  In  view  of  the  state- 
ments made  in  preceding  paragraphs,  it  may  naturally  be  inferred 
that  Mr.  Bullen  has  not  circumscribed  himself  within  the  narrow 
confines  of  personal  affairs ;  on  the  contrary,  he  has  manifested  the 
same  spirit  of  energy,  progressiveness  and  loyalty  in  his  civic  atti- 
tude and  is  a  liberal  and  public-spirited  citizen  of  Chicago.  While 
a  stalwart  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party,  he  has 
never  sought  or  desired  political  office,  but  his  civic  loyalty  has  been 
distinctly  shown  by  the  specially  effective  service  which  he  has 
rendered  as  a  member  of  the  West  Park  Board  of  Commissioners, 
in  which  he  held  preferment  as  auditor  and  also  as  a  member  of  the 
finance  committee.  He  is  a  life  member  of  the  South  Shore  Country 
Club  and  is  identified  also  with  the  Chicago  Automobile  Club  and 
the  Edgewater  Golf  Club,  all  representative  social  organizations  of 
the  western  metropolis.     In  1883  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  61 

Mr.  Bullen  to  Miss  Cora  B.  Landers,  who  was  born  in  the  State  of 
New  York,  and  their  one  child,  Mabel  L.,  is  the  wife  of  Herman  F. 
Friestedt,  of  Chicago. 

John  A.  Bunnell. — One  of  the  principals  in  the  firm  of  Hately 
Brothers,  which  controls  a  large  and  substantial  commission  busi- 
ness in  grain  and  provisions,  John  Alexander  Bunnell  has  been  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  since  1891, 
and  has  been  one  of  its  loyal  and  vigorous  representatives,  his 
ability  and  his  personal  popularity  among  the  members  of  the 
Board  having  been  given  significant  showing  when  he  was  elected 
to  the  Presidency  of  this  great  commercial  body,  an  office  of  which 
he  was  the  incumbent  in  1909  and  in  which  he  gave  a  most  effective 
and  popular  administration.  Prior  to  receiving  this  distinction  he 
had  served  as  a  member  of  the  Directorate  of  the  Board,  1897-9, 
and  his  interest  in  an  appreciation  of  the  organization  has  other- 
wise been  manifested  in  a  practical  and  helpful  way.  He  is  a  citizen 
who  is  alert,  liberal  and  public-spirited,  and  none  is  more  loyal  to 
Chicago  than  is  this  adopted  son.  Mr.  Bunnell  was  born  at  Brant- 
ford,  Province  of  Ontario,  Canada,  on  the  21st  of  April,  1864,  and 
is  a  son  of  Enos  and  Cornelia  (Kennedy)  Bunnell.  He  is  indebted 
to  the  public  schools  of  his  native  Province  for  his  early  educa- 
tional discipline,  and  he  was  an  ambitious  youth  of  eighteen  years 
when,  in  1882,  he  came  to  Chicago  and  threw  himself  vigorously 
into  the  work  of  gaining  for  himself  a  place  in  connection  with 
the  great  commercial  activities  of  this  metropolis.  He  held  various 
positions  within  the  years  that  followed,  and  at  all  times  was  alert 
to  avail  himself  of  opportunities  presented,  with  an  eye  single  to 
making  consecutive  and  honorable  advancement  in  the  business 
world.  He  early  became  associated  with  the  grain  commission 
trade  and  in  1891  he  acquired  membership  in  the  Board  of  Trade, 
this  year  likewise  having  recorded  his  admission  to  partnership  in 
the  representative  commission  firm  of  Hately  Brothers,  with  which 
he  has  since  continued  to  be  identified,  as  a  resourceful  and  valued 
executive  and  as  a  prominent  figure  in  the  activities  of  the  Board  of 
Trade.  Mr.  Bunnell  and  his  wife  are  zealous  communicants  of  the 
Protestant  Episcopal  church,  and  he  is  specially  active  and  influen- 
tial in  various  departments  of  church  work,  as  indicated  by  the  fact 
that  he  has  served  as  President  of  that  staunch  and  representative 
Chicago  organization,  the  Church  Club.  He  is  affiliated  with  the 
Royal  Arcanum,  and  holds  membership  in  the  Union  League  Club 
and  the  Exmoor  Country  Club.  At  Paris,  Province  of  Ontario, 
Canada,  on  the  11th  of  April,  1896,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of 
Mr.  Bunnell  to  Miss  Kate  Capron  Baird,  and  the  one  child  of  this 
union  is  a  daughter,  Margaret. 

William  French  Burrows. — To  the  larger  and  surer  vision  there 
is  no  such  thing  as  luck.  No  man  achieves  anything  worthy  until 
he  learns  the  power  of  conviction  and  concentration  and,  appreci- 


62  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

ative  thereof,  bends  his  energies  to  the  accomplishing  of  a  definite 
purpose.  Among  the  representative  men  of  affairs  in  Chicago  a 
place  of  well-earned  precedence  must  be  accorded  to  William  F. 
Burrows,  who  is  President  of  the  great  packing  and  provision  cor- 
poration of  Libby,  McNeill  &  Libby.  He  has  won  advancement 
in  the  commercial  world  by  the  vigorous  assertion  of  courage,  stay- 
ing power,  pluck  and  determination.  His  has  been  the  conviction 
born  of  the  consciousness  of  strength  and  integrity  of  purpose,  and 
thus  has  his  success-position  been  amply  fortified  at  all  times.  It 
is  much  to  have  risen  through  sheer  ability  and  hard  work  to  the 
head  of  one  of  the  great  industrial  concerns  of  the  nation,  and  the 
career  of  Mr.  Burrows  forcibly  illustrates  how  secure  a  vantage  place 
Chicago  has  offered  to  the  young  man  of  ambition,  initiative  power 
and  resolute  purpose.  The  Board  of  Trade  has  claimed  him  as  a 
member  since  November  28,  1884,  and  it  is  most  gratifying  to  be 
able  to  offer  in  this  publication  even  a  brief  review  of  his  career. 
William  French  Burrows  was  born  at  Somerville,  Massachusetts, 
on  the  13th  of  November,  1859,  and  is  a  son  of  Robert  and  Parmelia 
(French)  Burrows,  both  representatives  of  sterling  New  England 
families.  Mr.  Burrows  was  a  lad  of  six  years  at  the  time  of  the 
family  removal  to  the  city  of  Chicago,  and  here  he  duly  availed  him- 
self of  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools,  though  he  was  still  a 
mere  boy  when  he  initiated  his  independent  career  by  assuming,  in 
1871,  a  very  subordinate  position  with  the  Real  Estate  Loan  &  Trust 
Company,  which  later  became  the  Franklin  Bank.  With  this  con- 
cern he  remained  about  three  years,  and  in  1875  he  commenced  his 
association  with  the  meat-packing  industry  by  entering  the  employ 
of  Underwood  &  Co.  Diligent  and  ambitious,  he  made  use  of  what 
he  learned  and  learned  for  the  purpose  of  making  himself  more  use- 
ful,— the  true  basis  of  success  and  advancement.  In  1882  he  became 
associated  with  Libby,  McNeill  &  Libby,  and  in  this  connection  he 
effectually  proved  his  value,  as  is  clearly  demonstrated  by  the  fact 
that  when,  six  years  later,  the  business  was  incorporated,  under  the 
original  firm  title  that  is  still  maintained,  he  was  given  an  interest 
in  the  new  company.  Vigorous  and  buoyant  and  optimistic,  Mr. 
Burrows  has  never  been  the  man  who  stands  still,  and  thus  we  find 
that  in  April,  1893,  he  was  elected  Secretary  of  the  company.  June, 
1905,  recorded  his  advancement  to  the  office  of  Vice-President,  and 
in  March,  1915,  he  was  made  President  of  the  great  corporation  to 
whose  growth  and  development  he  had  contributed  in  large  and 
effective  measure.  The  following  pertinent  quotations  are  con- 
sistently given  perpetuation  in  this  connection  :  "Through  the  efforts 
of  Mr.  Burrows  the  firm  of  Libby,  McNeill  &  Libby,  whose  business 
in  earlier  years  was  to  can  meat  only,  was  extended  to  include  the 
canning  and  bottling  of  nearly  two  hundred  lines  of  California  fruits 
and  vegetables,  Hawaiian  pineapple,  Alaska  salmon,  Spanish  olives 
and  olive  oil,  pickles  and  condiments,  jams,  jellies  and  preserves. 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  63 

luncheon  specialties,  pork  and  beans,  evaporated  and  condensed 
milk,  sauerkraut,  soups,  beef  extract  and  bouillon  cubes.  Plants  are 
located  in  every  corner  of  the  globe.  A  hobby  with  Mr.  Burrows 
has  been  the  employes'  welfare  work.  A  welfare  building  at  the  Chi- 
cago plant  is  his  own  idea.  This  building  contains  a  restaurant 
where  three  thousand  employes  may  take  lunch  at  cost.  The  build- 
ing is  equipped  with  rest  rooms,  sanitary  lockers,  shower  and  tub 
baths,  and  has  been  a  means  of  increasing  the  efficiency  of  thousands 
of  workers.  This  welfare  plan  will  eventually  be  in  operation  in  all 
major  plants  of  the  company."  Mr.  Burrows  is  essentially  one  of 
Chicago's  captains  of  industry, — a  strong,  human,  genial,  consid- 
erate man  and  a  loyal  and  progressive  citizen.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Directorate  of  the  Fort  Dearborn  National  Bank,  and  is  a  popu- 
lar member  of  the  Chicago  Club,  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club,  the 
South  Shore  Country  Club  and  the  Exmoor  Country  Club.  The 
attractive  family  home,  known  for  its  generous  hospitality,  is  at 
4847  Woodlawn  Avenue,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burrows  are  members 
of  St.  Paul's  Universalist  church.  On  the  7th  of  September,  1880, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Burrows  to  Miss  Annie  L. 
Libby,  and  they  have  four  children — Louisa  L.,  Marjorie  P.,  William 
F.,  Jr.,  and  Arthur  A. 

Lucius  A.  Calkins. — Claiming  as  his  own  the  honor  of  being  a 
native  son  of  Chicago,  Mr.  Calkins  has  here  gained  through  his 
own  volition  and  ability  the  further  distinction  of  being  a  successful 
exponent  of  the  commission  grain  trade,  with  which  he  has  been 
identified  during  the  entire  period  of  his  active  business  life  and  in 
connection  with  which  he  has  gained  intimate  and  authoritative 
knowledge.  He  is  now  engaged  in  business  as  a  broker  in  grain  and 
stocks,  and  is  the  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  L.  A.  Calkins  &  Co., 
of  which  he  is  a  representative  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  Lucius 
Allen  Calkins  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the  14th  of  August,  1860, 
and  is  a  son  of  Allen  C.  and  Sophia  J.  (Larrabee)  Calkins.  In  the 
public  schools  of  his  native  city  he  continued  his  studies  until  he  had 
completed  the  curriculum  of  the  high  school,  and  on  leaving  this 
institution  he  entered  the  employ  of  D.  W.  Irwin  &  Co.,  a  leading 
firm  in  the  grain  commission  business.  He  made  good  use  of  his 
novitiate  in  the  line  of  enterprise  with  which  he  was  associated 
with  various  other  firms  connected  with  the  operations  of  the  Board 
of  Trade.  In  1899  he  engaged  in  business  for  himself,  as  a  member 
of  the  firm  of  Wrenn,  Calkins  &  Eagan,  with  which  he  continued  his 
operations  as  a  grain  and  stock  broker  until  1909,  when  he  formed 
the  present  alliance  represented  under  the  firm  name  of  L.  A. 
Calkins  &  Co.,  which  maintains  its  offices  in  the  Board  of  Trade 
Building  and  which  controls  a  substantial  and  satisfactory  business. 
Mr.  Calkins  resides  in  the  suburb  of  Edgewater,  where  he  is  an 
active  member  of  the  Edgewater  Golf  Club  and  the  Edgewater 
Country  Club,  besides  which   he   holds  membership   also   in   the 


64  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Skokie  Club.  In  the  year  1898  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr. 
Calkins  to  Miss  Henrietta  Harland,  of  Chicago,  and  they  have  two 
daughters — Henrietta  Mary  and  Eleanor  Harlowe. 

Edwin  L.  Camp. — A  prominent  non-resident  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  through  the  medium  of 
which  he  orders  much  of  the  extensive  business  with  which  he  is 
identified  as  Secretary  and  Treasurer  of  the  Toledo  Grain  &  Milling 
Company,  of  Toledo,  Ohio,  Mr.  Camp  is  one  of  the  vigorous  ex- 
ponents of  the  grain  trade  and  is  properly  given  specific  considera- 
tion in  this  history  of  the  great  commercial  body  in  which  he 
now  retains  membership.  Edwin  L.  Camp  was  born  in  Warren, 
Ohio,  September  12,  1873,  and  is  one  of  the  four  children  born 
to  Daniel  W.  and  Geraldine  (Barnes)  Camp.  Daniel  W.  Camp 
engaged  in  the  grain  business  in  Ohio  in  the  early  '60s,  and  was  the 
founder  of  the  now  extensive  and  important  industrial  enterprise 
now  conducted  by  the  Toledo  Grain  &  Milling  Company,  of  which 
he  is  president  and  which  he  has  brought  to  a  foremost  position  in 
its  line.  The  well-equipped  milling  plant  of  this  company  has 
gained  special  reputation  through  its  manufacturing  of  the  high- 
grade  product  known  as  "Camp's  Pansy  Flour,"  the  sale  of  which 
extends  far  beyond  local  limitations.  The  capacity  of  the  mill  that 
is  owned  and  operated  by  the  father  and  son  under  the  corporate 
title  already  noted  is  in  the  output  of  600  barrels  of  flour  daily  and 
250  tons  of  feed  per  day,  and  are  large  manufacturers  of  poultry 
feeds.  The  mill  is  kept  in  operation  day  and  night  to  meet  the  de- 
mands placed  upon  it  by  its  extensive  trade,  and  the  company  gives 
employment  to  eighty-five  persons  in  connection  with  the  various 
departments  of  the  business.  Edwin  L.  Camp  was  reared  and 
educated  in  his  native  town  of  Warren,  Ohio,  where  he  continued 
his  studies  in  the  public  schools  until  he  had  completed  the  curricu- 
lum of  the  high  school,  and  in  1889  he  accompanied  his  parents  on 
their  removal  to  Toledo,  where  he  has  since  been  actively  and  suc- 
cessfully associated  with  his  father  in  the  grain  and  milling  busi- 
ness, of  which  he  has  become  one  of  the  most  influential  represen- 
tatives in  this  part  of  the  Buckeye  State.  In  addition  to  his  alliance 
with  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  he  holds  membership  also  in  the 
Toledo  Produce  Exchange.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Toledo  Club,  is 
affiliated  with  the  Benevolent  &  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  is  unfal- 
tering in  his  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  and  he  and  his  wife 
hold  membership  in  the  Unitarian  church.  In  1900  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Camp  to  Miss  Virginia  Gausman,  and  they  have 
two  children — Daniel  W.,  Ill,  and  Katherine  Virginia. 

George  T.  Carhart. — At  this  juncture  is  given  brief  record  con- 
cerning a  native  son  of  Chicago  who  has  attained  to  marked  prom- 
inence and  success  as  a  representative  of  the  grain  commission 
business  and  who  has  proved  a  specially  vigorous  and  influential 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  is  a  Director  at  the  time 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  65 

of  this  writing,  in  1916.  He  has  been  identified  with  the  commission 
business  in  his  native  city  from  the  initiation  of  his  independent 
career,  for  in  1888,  soon  after  leaving  school,  he  entered  the  service 
of  the  well-known  commission  house  of  Montague  &  Co.,  with 
which  he  made  rapid  advancement  through  sheer  energy  and  dis- 
criminating application,  with  the  result  that  he  familiarized  himself 
with  all  matters  pertaining  to  this  important  line  of  commercial 
enterprise,  with  the  result  that  when  Montague  &  Co.  incorporated 
its  business,  in  1896,  he  was  admirably  fortified  for  the  exacting 
executive  duties  that  devolved  upon  him  when  he  was  chosen 
President  of  the  company.  Of  this  position  he  continued  the  in- 
cumbent until  1911,  when  he  effected  the  organization  and  incorpo- 
ration of  the  Carhart,  Code,  Harwood  Company,  of  which  he  has 
since  continued  the  President  and  to  the  furtherance  of  the  exten- 
sive business  of  which  he  has  given  the  full  strength  of  his  expe- 
rience and  distinctive  initiative  and  administrative  ability.  Mr. 
Carhart  is  found  aligned  as  a  loyal  supporter  of  the  principles  and 
policies  for  which  the  Republican  party  has  ever  stood  sponsor 
in  a  basic  way,  and  he  takes  most  lively  interest  in  all  things  per- 
taining to  the  civic  and  material  welfare  of  his  native  city.  He  is 
actively  affiliated  with  various  bodies  of  the  time-honored  Masonic 
fraternity.  On  the  19th  of  September,  1894,  Mr.  Carhart  wedded 
Miss  Susie  D.  Page,  of  Chicago,  and  they  have  two  daughters- 
Dorothy  Murray  and  Margaret.  Mr.  Carhart  was  born  in  Chicago 
on  the  17th  of  October,  1871,  and  is  a  son  of  Richard  L.  and  Lucinda 
A.  (Smith)  Carhart.  His  early  educational  advantages  were  those 
afforded  in  the  public  schools,  and  he  was  about  seventeen  years  of 
age  when  he  initiated  his  business  career  under  the  conditions  of 
which  mention  has  been  made  above. 

James  B.  Carter. — For  virtually  two  score  of  years  has  Mr. 
Carter  been  engaged  in  the  grain,  flour  and  feed  business  in  Chi- 
cago, as  junior  member  of  the  veteran  firm  of  Z.  R.  Carter  & 
Brother,  the  senior  member  of  which  is  the  representative  citizen, 
Zina  R.  Carter,  who  is  accorded  individual  recognition  on  other 
pages  of  this  work.  Mr.  Carter  has  been  active  in  the  affairs  of 
the  Board  of  Trade,  and  as  a  successful  trader  has  lent  his  influence 
in  the  upholding  of  the  best  interests  of  the  greatest  commercial 
body  of  its  kind  in  the  world.  James  Benajah  Carter  was  born  in 
Jefferson  County,  New  York,  on  the  16th  of  October,  1849,  and  is 
a  son  of  Benajah  and  Isabel  (Cole)  Carter.  He  was  reared  to  the 
sturdy  discipline  of  the  home  farm  and  gained  in  the  common 
schools  of  the  locality  and  period  his  early  educational  discipline. 
When  Mr.  Carter  established  his  home  in  Chicago,  his  first  year 
found  him  occupying  the  humble  station  of  driver  of  an  ice  wagon. 
Vigorous,  self-reliant  and  ambitious,  advancement  in  temporal 
prosperity  came  to  him  as  a  matter  of  course,  and  soon  he  was 
found  established  in  the  retail  grocery  business,  with  which  modest 


66  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

enterprise  he  continued  his  identification  until  1877,  when  he  be- 
came associated  with  his  older  brother,  Zina  R.,  and  E.  W.  Fisher  in 
the  grain  and  feed  business,  with  which  he  has  since  continued  to 
be  actively  and  successfully  concerned,  the  history  of  the  old  and 
well-known  firm  of  Z.  R.  Carter  &  Brother  having  been  one  of  con- 
secutive and  progressive  order  during  the  long  intervening  years. 
The  political  allegiance  of  Mr.  Carter  is  given  to  the  Republican 
party,  and  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Baptist  church, 
their  attractive  home  being  located  at  4605  Sheridan  Road,  in  the 
beautiful  north  division  of  Chicago.  On  the  29th  of  December, 
1873,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Carter  to  Miss  Emma 
Chambers,  of  Chicago,  and  they  have  three  children — Edith,  Anna 
and  Nettie. 

Zina  R.  Carter. — Known  and  honored  as  one  of  the  strong, 
steadfast  and  resourceful  business  men  and  influential  and  public- 
spirited  citizens  of  Chicago,  Zina  R.  Carter  has  here  been  estab- 
lished in  the  grain  and  feed  business  for  more  than  forty  years. 
He  is  now  one  of  the  veteran  representatives  of  this  line  of  enter- 
prise in  the  western  metropolis,  and  in  connection  therewith  he 
has  achieved  large  and  worthy  success,  his  advancement  in  life 
having  been  gained  entirely  through  his  own  ability  and  well- 
directed  endeavors.  Dependent  upon  his  own  resources  in  mak- 
ing his  way  in  the  world,  he  has  had  his  mede  of  fellowship  with 
the  adverse  forces  that  face  every  man  who  essays  the  task  of 
making  his  way  by  earnest  and  honest  effort  to  the  goal  of  worthy 
prosperity,  and  his  was  not  the  fortuitous  equipment  of  broad 
education  or  financial  reinforcement.  Such  men  exemplify  most 
fully  the  true  American  spirit,  and  it  has  been  given  to  this  sterling 
Chicago  citizen  to  overcome  the  handicaps  of  earlier  years,  to 
widen  his  intellectual  horizon  to  broad  compass,  to  make  for  him- 
self secure  place  in  the  business  world  and  to  stand  exponent  of 
the  most  vigorous,  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizenship.  He  has 
wielded  much  influence  in  connection  with  civic  affairs  in  Chicago, 
served  with  characteristic  fidelity  and  circumspection  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  city  board  of  aldermen,  and  in  1899  was  the  Republican 
candidate  for  mayor  of  Chicago,  his  defeat  for  this  distinguished 
office  having  been  the  result  of  normal  political  exigencies.  He 
gave  specially  effective  service  during  the  long  period  of  his  in- 
cumbency of  the  position  of  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of 
the  Sanitary  District  of  Chicago,  in  which  connection  his  services 
were  enlisted  from  1895  to  1905,  during  the  first  two  years  of 
which  he  was  President  of  the  board.  As  a  prominent  representa- 
tive of  the  grain,  flour  and  feed  business  Mr.  Carter  has  been  asso- 
ciated since  1877  with  his  brother,  James  B.,  under  the  firm  name 
of  Z.  R.  Carter  &  Brother,  and  their  business  headquarters  are 
established  at  the  corner  of  Sixteenth  and  Halsted  streets,  where 
they  control  a  large  and  substantial  enterprise  of  wide  ramifica- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  67 

tions.  Of  the  junior  member  of  the  firm  individual  mention  is 
made  on  other  pages  of  this  publication,  both  of  the  brothers  hav- 
ing long  held  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  Zina  R.  Carter 
became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  in  1872,  the  year  follow- 
ing that  of  the  great  Chicago  fire,  and  through  his  resourceful 
influence  and  zeal  he  aided  much  in  the  revitalizing  and  advance- 
ment of  this  great  commercial  body  after  its  afTairs  had  been 
measurably  disrupted  by  that  great  urban  catastrophe.  He  has 
been  influential  in  the  government  and  general  activities  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  for  many  years,  and  his  vantage  place  in  the  con- 
fidence and  esteem  of  its  members  has  been  at  all  times  secure,  this 
objective  attitude  having  been  emphatically  signalized  when  he 
was  elected  to  the  Presidency  of  this  great  Chicago  institution,  an 
office  of  which  he  was  the  efficient  and  valued  incumbent  in  the 
year  1898.  He  has  been  in  past  years  specially  active  and  influential 
in  the  Chicago  ranks  of  the  Republican  party,  and  his  prime  political 
distinction  came  when  he  was  chosen  as  his  party's  candidate  for 
mayor,  as  previously  noted  in  this  context.  Mr.  Carter  was  born 
in  a  primitive  log-cabin  home  in  Jefferson  county.  New  York,  and 
the  date  of  his  nativity  was  October  23,  1846.  He  is  a  son  of 
Benajah  and  Isabel  (Cole)  Carter,  who  passed  their  entire  lives  in 
the  old  Empire  state.  Mr.  Carter  gained  through  his  early  and 
close  association  with  the  operations  of  the  farm  a  lasting  appre- 
ciation of  the  dignity  and  value  of  honest  toil  and  endeavor,  and 
such  were  the  circumstances  of  time  and  place  that  his  early 
educational  advantages  were  extremely  limited,  though  he  gained 
sufficient  scholastic  training  to  form  a  basis  for  the  broader  and 
practical  education  which  came  to  his  alert  and  receptive  mind 
in  connection  with  the  activities  of  a  remarkably  successful  busi- 
ness career.  At  the  age  of  eighteen  years  Mr.  Carter  came  to 
Illinois  and  established  his  residence  in  Dupage  county,  where 
he  found  employment  at  farm  work  and  where  he  continued  to 
maintain  his  home  until  1871,  when  he  came  to  Chicago  and 
engaged  in  the  grain  and  feed  business,  in  which  his  brother, 
James  B.,  became  his  coadjutor  in  the  year  1877,  under  the  title 
of  Z.  R.  Carter  &  Brother,  which  has  been  retained  during  the  long 
intervening  years — years  marked  by  their  development  and  up- 
building of  a  large  and  important  business. 

Frederick  T.  Chandler. — In  according  recognition  in  this  his- 
tory to  the  non-resident  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago  it  is  pleasing  to  be  able  to  make  specific  mention 
of  Mr.  Chandler,  who  is  the  excutive  head  of  the  influential  bank- 
ing and  brokerage  firm  of  Chandler  Brothers  &  Co.,  of  Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania.  He  has  represented  his  firm  on  the  Board 
of  Trade  since  1904,  and  has  a  large  acquaintanceship  among  the 
prominent  local  members  of  this  great  commercial  organization. 
The  Philadelphia  offices  of  Chandler  Brothers  &  Co.  are  established 


68  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

at  1336  Chestnut  street,  and  the  New  York  branch  office  is  at  34 
Pine  street.  Mr.  Chandler  is  one  of  the  influential  members  of 
the  Philadelphia  Stock  Exchange  and  holds  membership  also  in 
the  New  York  Stock  Exchange  and  the  New  York  Produce 
Exchange.  Frederick  T.  Chandler  was  born  in  Philadelphia  in 
December,  1863,  and  is  one  of  the  four  children  born  to  John  W. 
and  Almina  (Taylor)  Chandler.  His  broader  education  has  been 
gained  under  the  direction  of  that  wisest  of  all  head-masters, 
experience,  and  he  has  been  in  the  most  significant  sense  the 
builder  of  the  ladder  on  which  he  has  risen  to  a  position  of  promi- 
nence and  influence  in  the  commercial  world.  He  attended  the 
public  schools  in  his  boyhood  days,  but  was  only  fourteen  years 
of  age  when  he  obtained  employment  as  office  boy  for  a  leading 
brokerage  house  in  his  native  city.  His  youthful  ambition  was 
one  of  action  and  he  made  good  use  of  every  opportunity  that  pre- 
sented, applied  himself  diligently  and  by  making  his  services  of 
constantly  increasing  value  won  successive  advancement,  the  while 
he  gained  a  comprehensive  and  accurate  knowledge  of  all  details 
of  the  important  line  of  business  in  which  he  has  risen  to  his  present 
stature  as  a  dominating  figure  and  the  head  of  the  firm  of  Chandler 
Brothers  &  Co.,  which  was  organized  by  him  in  1898,  and  the 
progressive  and  honorable  policies  of  which  indicate  the  resource- 
fulness, energy  and  correct  methods  which  he  has  brought  to  bear 
in  the  developing  of  a  specially  successful  business.  Mr.  Chandler 
has  been  one  of  the  world's  constructive  workers,  has  achieved 
success  and  merited  the  same,  and  amidst  the  manifold  exactions 
of  a  remarkably  active  business  career  he  has  found  time  and  oppor- 
tunity to  express  himself  also  in  loyal  and  progressive  citizenship. 
The  political  proclivities  of  Mr.  Chandler  are  indicated  in  the 
allegiance  which  he  gives  to  the  Republican  party,  and  he  is 
affiliated  with  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  the  Benevolent  and  Pro- 
tective Order  of  Elks.  Mr.  Chandler  was  married  to  Miss  Hen- 
rietta Weber,  and  their  attractive  home  is  at  6025  Overbrook 
avenue,  in  one  of  the  fine  residential  districts  of  Philadelphia,  and 
they  have  five  children.  Frederick  T.  Chandler,  Jr.,  is  associated 
with  his  father  in  business  and  is  one  of  the  alert  and  popular  young 
business  men  of  the  city  in  which  he  was  born  and  reared. 

Reuben  G.  Chandler. — A  resident  of  Chicago  for  somewhat 
more  than  forty  years,  Reuben  Grigsby  Chandler  has  made  these 
years  count  in  large  and  worthy  achievement  and  has  risen  to  a 
position  of  marked  prominence  and  influence  in  connection  with  the 
brokerage  and  general  commission  grain  trade  that  finds  its  chief 
center  in  the  vigorous  metropolis  of  the  west.  With  clear,  firm 
and  useful  ambition,  both  immediate  and  ultimate,  he  has  proved 
his  resourcefulness  in  his  chosen  sphere  of  action  and  has  been  a 
progressive  and  valued  factor  in  the  varied  activities  of  the  Board 
of  Trade,  his  membership  in  which  dates  from  the  year  1879  and 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  69 

his  prominence  and  popularity  in  which   is  indicated  by  the  fact 
that  in  1903  he  served  as  President  of  this  great  Chicago  organiza- 
tion.   That  the  sons  of  the  fair  Southland  are  not  in  the  least  lack- 
ing in  the  vital  American  spirit  of  progress  has  been  significantly 
demonstrated  in  the  career  of  Mr.  Chandler,  who  takes  just  pride 
in  reverting  to  the  historic  Old  Dominion  as  the  place  of  his  nativ- 
ity, and  who  is  a  scion  of  line  old  families  of  that  commonwealth. 
Mr.   Chandler  was  born  in   Rockbridge   County,  Virginia,  on  the 
16th  of  December,   1852,  and  is  a  son  of  Norborne   E.  and   Lucy 
(Grigsby)  Chandler.     In  his  youth  he  was  afiforded  the  advantages 
of  excellent  private  schools  and  in  1869  entered  the  Virginia  Mili- 
tary Institute,  graduating  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1873.     In 
1875,  as  an  ambitious  young  man  of  twenty-two  years,  Mr.  Chand- 
ler came  to  Chicago  and  initiated  a  business  career  that  has  found 
him  at  all  times   loyal,  energetic  and   circumspect,   and   that   has 
eventuated   in   his   gaining  precedence   as   one    of  the   influential 
figures  in  the  grain  trade  and  the  sterling  phalanx  of  the  Board 
of  Trade,  which  has  honored  and  been  honored  by  his  interposition. 
Concerning  him  the  following  pertinent  statement  has  been  written  : 
"He  grew  up  with  the  commercial  interests  of  the  city  during  the 
period  of  its  most  marvelous  development,  and  he  has  never  lost 
an  opportunity  to  do  what  he  could   for  the  advancement  of  the 
best  interests  of  the  great  city  which  has  figured  as  the  stage  of  his 
splendid    achievement."     Soon    after    his    arrival    in    Chicago    Mr. 
Chandler   entered    the    employ   of   the   representative    commission 
firm  of  Rumsey  &  Walker,  in  connection  with  whose  operations 
he  gained  accurate  and  valuable  knowledge  concerning  the  details 
of  the  grain  trade.     After  remaining  with  this  firm  for  a  period 
of  five  years  Mr.  Chandler  formed,  in  1880,  a  partnership  alliance 
with  J.  Frank  Rumsey,  and  the  firm  of  Rumsey  &  Chandler  there- 
after continued  a  substantial  commission  business  until  its  dissolu- 
tion, in  1895.     For  the  ensuing  ten  years  Mr.  Chandler  conducted 
a  successful  independent  enterprise  in  the  grain  commission  trade, 
and,  with  secure  prestige  in  this  field  of  endeavor,  he  then  became 
one  of  the  organizers  of  the  present  brokerage  and  commission 
firm  of  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Chandler,  which  dates  its  inception 
from  1905  and  of  which  he  has  continued  one  of  the  executive  heads. 
This  firm  is  known  as  one  of  the  most  reliable,  substantial  and 
progressive  commission  concerns  of  Chicago,  which  implies  equal 
prestige  as  touching  the  entire  United  States,  and  the  representation 
of  the  firm  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  has  lent 
its  quota  of  dignity  and  distinction  to  that  body.     Mr.  Chandler 
has  been   fully   appreciative  of  the   history   and    functions   of   the 
Board  of  Trade  and  has  done  his  part  in  the  furtherance  of  its  in- 
terests and  the  upholding  of  its  unspotted  and  unwritten  code  of 
business   ethics.     He  has   served   in   various   executive   capacities 
on  the  Board  and  was  honored  in  being  elected  its  President,  an 


70  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

office  of  which  he  was  the  efficient  and  popular  incumbent  during 
the  year  1903.  Mr.  Chandler  has  taken  lively  interest  in  all  things 
pertaining  to  the  civic  and  material  welfare  and  advancement  of 
Chicago,  is  loyal  to  the  political  faith  that  has  long  been  dominant 
in  his  native  commonwealth  and  thus  gives  his  allegiance  to  the 
Democratic  party,  though  he  has  manifested  naught  of  ambition  for 
political  preferment  of  any  kind.  He  was  for  a  number  of  years 
actively  identified  with  the  First  Infantry  Regiment  of  the  Illinois 
National  Guard,  in  which  representative  Chicago  body  he  was 
the  organizer  of  Company  K,  of  which  he  served  effectively  as 
first  lieutenant.  A  definitely  representative  figure  in  the  business 
and  social  activities  of  Chicago,  Mr.  Chandler  has  a  host  of  staunch 
and  valued  friends  in  the  city  that  has  long  been  his  home  and  in 
which  he  has  found  opportunity  for  the  winning  of  large  and  worthy 
success.  He  holds  membership  in  such  prominent  civic  organiza- 
tions as  the  Union  League  and  the  Chicago  Club,  besides  which 
the  Onwentsia  Club  claims  him  as  an  appreciative  member  and  as 
one  of  its  golf  enthusiasts.  On  the  28th  of  November,  1883,  was 
solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Chandler  to  Miss  Virginia  Hamil- 
ton, of  Chicago,  and  she  was  summoned  to  the  life  eternal  on  the 
7th  of  November,  1894,  the  surviving  children  being  Virginia,  Ruby 
and  Walter. 

Simeon  B.  Chapin. — Since  the  year  1892  Mr.  Chapin  has  been 
established  in  successful  and  representative  business  as  a  banker 
and  broker  in  stocks,  bonds  and  grain,  and  the  substantial  enter- 
prise, of  far-extended  ramifications,  is  conducted  under  the  title  of 
S.  B.  Chapin  &  Co.  By  his  resourceful  and  well-directed  activities 
Mr.  Chapin  has  gained  secure  vantage  ground  as  one  of  the  influen- 
tial representatives  of  these  important  lines  of  commercial  enter- 
prise in  the  western  metropolis  and  the  same  scrupulous  fidelity  and 
rectitude  that  have  characterized  his  independent  business  career 
have  marked  his  association  as  a  loyal  and  appreciative  member 
of  the  Board  of  Trade.  Simeon  Brooks  Chapin  was  born  in  the 
city  of  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  on  the  31st  of  May,  1865,  and  is  a 
son  of  Emory  D.  and  Marietta  (Armour)  Chapin.  His  early  edu- 
cational advantages  included  those  afforded  in  the  public  schools 
of  his  native  city  and  the  Harvard  School  of  Chicago.  In  1881, 
when  seventeen  years  of  age,  Mr.  Chapin  went  to  Kansas  City, 
Missouri,  where  he  initiated  his  business  career  in  the  dignified 
position  of  messenger  in  the  employ  of  Armour  Brothers  Banking 
Company.  In  the  following  year  he  returned  to  Chicago,  and  here 
he  continued  in  the  employ  of  Armour  &  Co.  for  nearly  a  decade. 
He  won  advancement  by  effective  service  in  the  various  depart- 
ments with  which  he  was  connected  for  different  intervals,  and  he 
finally  resigned  a  responsible  position  with  this  great  Chicago  con- 
cern to  engage  in  the  independent  business  with  which  he  is  still 
associated,  as  head  of  the  well-known  and  representative  banking 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  71 

and  brokerage  firm  of  S.  B.  Chapin  &  Co.,  the  Chicago  offices  of 
which  are  in  the  Rookery  Building  and  the  New  York  offices  at  111 
Broadway.  Mr.  Chapin  has  never  had  any  ambition  for  public 
office  or  for  activity  in  practical  politics,  but  he  is  emphatically  loyal 
and  liberal  in  his  civic  attitude  and  gives  his  allegiance  to  the  Repub- 
lican party.  In  Chicago  he  holds  membership  in  the  Union  League, 
the  Chicago  and  the  Chicago  Athletic  Clubs,  and  in  New  York  City 
he  maintains  membership  in  the  Metropolitan  and  Midday  Clubs. 
Both  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  historic  Plymouth  Con- 
gregational church  of  Chicago.  On  the  5th  of  October,  1892,  was 
solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Chapin  to  Miss  Elizabeth  A.  Mat- 
tocks, of  Chicago,  and  they  have  three  children — Marietta  L.,  Eliza- 
beth M.  and  Simeon  Brooks,  Jr. 

Clinton  L.  Childs. — In  the  scope  and  solidity  of  its  operations 
in  the  grain  and  stock  brokerage  business  the  firm  of  Childs,  Kay 
&  Woods  occupies  a  place  of  merited  priority  in  the  city  of  Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania,  and  it  has  membership  enrollment  not  only 
on  the  lists  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  but  also 
those  of  the  Pittsburgh  Stock  Exchange  and  the  New  York  Stock 
Exchange.  The  offices  of  the  firm  are  in  the  Union  Bank  Building, 
Pittsburgh,  and  the  interested  principals  in  the  business  are  Clinton 
L.  Childs,  A.  G.  Kay  and  C.  W.  Woods,  the  present  partnership 
organization  being  the  successor  of  the  former  firm  of  Danner, 
Childs  &  Woods,  which  was  organized  in  1905.  Clinton  Lowrie 
Childs,  now  the  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  Childs,  Kay  &  Woods, 
was  born  in  Pittsburgh,  on  the  5th  of  July,  1879,  and  is  the  only 
living  child  of  Harvey  L.  and  Laura  (Bidwell)  Childs,  who  still 
reside  in  Pittsburgh.  The  father  was  formerly  a  prominent  repre- 
sentative of  the  mill-supply  business  and  is  now  living  virtually 
retired,  one  of  the  substantial  and  honored  citizens  of  Pittsburgh. 
After  attending  the  public  schools  Clinton  L.  Childs  continued  his 
studies  in  Phillips  Academy  at  Andover,  Massachusetts,  and  then 
entered  Yale  University,  from  which  instituion  he  was  graduated, 
receiving  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  Immediately  after  leaving 
the  university,  Mr.  Childs  followed  out  his  well-formulated  plans 
by  identifying  himself  with  the  stock  and  grain  brokerage  business 
in  his  native  city,  and  his  close  application,  his  vigorous  methods, 
and  vital  business  policies  have  brought  to  him  success.  Mr.  Childs 
has  been  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  since  1907  and 
has  not  failed  to  make  constructive  use  of  its  privileges,  so  that  he 
is  duly  valued  as  one  of  its  non-resident  members.  Mr.  Childs  is 
a  Republican  in  politics,  and  is  a  member  of  various  civic,  fraternal 
and  social  organizations.  Mr.  Childs  was  married  to  Miss  Isabel 
Pontfract,  a  daughter  of  James  G.  Pontfract,  of  Pittsburgh,  and 
three  children  have  been  born  to  this  union. 

Allan  M.  Clement. — As  a  grain  and  stock  broker  Allan  Mont- 
gomery Clement  has  won  distinctive  success  and  precedence  in  his 


72  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

native  city,  where  he  is  now  executive  head  of  the  representative 
commission  firm  of  Clement,  Curtis  &  Co.,  which  has  secure  van- 
tage place  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  besides 
finding  representation  also  on  the  Chicago  Stock  Exchange,  the 
New  York  Stock  Exchange,  the  New  York  Cotton  Exchange,  the 
New  York  Coflfee  Exchange,  and  the  New  York  Produce  Exchange. 
In  the  directing  of  the  extensive  and  multifarious  business  of  this 
important  firm  Mr.  Clement  has  shown  marked  versatility  and  cir- 
cumspection and  his  valued  coadjutor,  John  F.  L.  Curtis,  is  indi- 
vidually mentioned  on  other  pages  of  this  publication,  both  being 
loyal  and  popular  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  appreciative 
observers  of  its  fine  but  unwritten  code  of  commercial  ethics. 
Allan  Montgomery  Clement  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the  31st  of 
October,  1869,  and  is  a  son  of  Austin  and  Sarah  (Montgomery) 
Clement.  After  due  preliminary  discipline  in  the  public  schools  of 
his  native  city  Mr.  Clement  entered  the  Chicago  Manual  Training 
School,  in  which  he  was  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of 
1886.  In  the  same  year  he  entered  upon  his  novitiate  in  the  busi- 
ness world  by  assuming  a  position  in  the  employ  of  the  firm  of 
Clement,  Bane  &  Co.,  engaged  in  the  stock  commission  business, 
and  with  this  concern,  in  which  his  father  was  an  interested  prin- 
cipal, he  continued  to  be  identified  for  a  period  of  fifteen  years. 
He  then  became  a  member  of  the  stock  brokerage  firm  of  Raymond, 
Pynchon  &  Co.,  but  three  years  later  he  formed  a  similar  alliance 
with  the  firm  of  Lester,  Kneeland  &  Co.  One  year  later,  after  the 
death  of  Mr.  Lester,  his  name  became  represented  in  the  firm 
title  that  was  then  adopted,  that  of  Kneeland,  Clement  &  Curtis. 
Under  this  title  the  substantial  brokerage  business  was  continued 
until  January,  1907,  when  a  reorganization  took  place  and  the 
present  firm  of  Clement,  Curtis  &  Co.  was  formed.  Mr.  Clement 
is  found  arrayed  as  a  staunch  and  loyal  supporter  of  the  cause 
of  the  Republican  party,  and  aside  from  his  large  and  important 
business  activities  he  finds  marked  satisfaction  in  his  identification 
with  the  Chicago  Club,  the  Union  League  Club,  the  Glen  View 
Club,  the  Midlothian  Club  and  the  South  Shore  Country  Club, 
of  which  last  named  organization  he  is  a  director  in  1916.  In  the 
year  1894  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Clement  to  Miss 
Grace  Groves,  of  Chicago,  and  they  have  two  sons — Austin  Arthur 
and  Franklin  Groves. 

Frank  G.  Coe. — Through  his  own  ability  and  well-ordered 
endeavors  Frank  Gait  Coe  has  made  himself  a  valued  and  influen- 
tial factor  in  connection  with  the  extensive  and  important  com- 
mercial and  industrial  enterprise  conducted  by  the  Corn  Products 
Refining  Company.  He  represents  this  corporation  on  the  Board 
of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  of  which  he  has  been  a  member 
since  1902,  and  his  well-established  reputation  for  authoritative 
knowledge  of  the  grain  business,  as  a  crop  expert,  makes  his  inter- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  73 

position  specially  valuable  in  the  buying  of  corn  for  the  various 
factories  owned  and  controlled  by  the  progressive  corporation  with 
which  he  is  identified  and  which  is  engaged  in  the  manufacture 
of  syrup,  starch  and  other  corn  products  upon  an  extensive  scale. 
Mr.  Coe  was  born  at  Sterling,  Illinois,  on  the  15th  of  August,  1876, 
and  is  a  son  of  Mark  L.  and  Julia  (Gait)  Coe.  He  continued  his 
studies  in  the  public  schools  until  he  had  completed  the  curriculum 
of  the  high  school,  and  in  the  earlier  stage  of  his  active  career 
he  made  an  excellent  record  in  the  dignified  position  of  newspaper 
reporter.  He  later  held  a  position  as  private  secretary  and  finally 
qualified  and  gave  significantly  effective  service  as  a  crop  expert. 
As  already  noted  in  this  context,  he  has  held  membership  on  the 
Board  of  Trade  since  1902,  and  he  has  become  well  known  as  a 
specialist  in  cash  corn,  the  while  he  takes  loyal  and  active  interest 
in  all  things  pertaining  to  the  great  commercial  body  with  which 
he  is  thus  identified  and  in  which  he  has  given  effective  service 
as  a  member  of  the  promotion  committee.  Mr.  Coe  is  a  member 
of  the  City  Club  of  Chicago  and  of  the  Park  Ridge  Country  Club. 
He  and  his  wife  are  zealous  members  of  the  Lake  View  Presby- 
terian church,  in  which  he  holds  the  office  of  elder,  and  he  is  a 
member  of  the  board  of  managers  of  the  Chicago  Young  Men's 
Christian  Association.  On  the  25th  of  February,  1909,  was  solemn- 
ized the  marriage  of  Mr.  Coe  to  Miss  Ruth  Reynolds,  of  Prophets- 
town,  Illinois,  and  their  home  is  maintained  at  746  Bittersweet 
Place,  in  the  Lake  View  district  of  Chicago.  They  have  no 
children. 

William  Charles  Comstock. — In  preparing  a  review  of  the 
careers  of  prominent  men  in  connection  with  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  the  City  of  Chicago,  none  are  more  worthy  of  mention  in  a 
work  of  this  character  than  William  C.  Comstock,  for  many  years 
an  active  member  of  the  organization,  and  one  of  the  city's  most 
conservative  financiers.  He  has  not  only  achieved  notable  success 
in  business,  but  is  an  active  factor  in  the  social  and  charitable 
life  of  the  city,  and  his  progressive  spirit  is  evident  in  many  ways. 
He  came  to  Chicago  when  he  was  young;  he  has  grown  up  with 
the  city  and  has  helped  to  make  it  grow,  and  he  typifies  to  the 
fullest  extent  the  real  Chicago  spirit.  Mr.  Comstock  was  born  in 
Oswego  County,  New  York,  October  20,  1847.  He  came  West 
with  his  parents,  Charles  and  Julia  J.  (Sprague)  Comstock,  when 
fourteen  years  of  age,  and  since  that  date  has  been  a  resident  of 
Chicago  and  its  beautiful  suburb  of  Evanston.  He  acquired  a 
substantial  education  in  private  schools  and  the  Northwestern 
University,  and  soon  after  attaining  his  majority  in  1868  began 
operations  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  becoming  a  member  soon  after- 
ward as  an  exponent  of  the  grain  commission  trade.  He  sold  his 
membership,  however,  January  8,  1890,  and  on  July  16  of  the  same 
year  joined  again,  and  has  since  continued  as  one  of  its  active  and 


74  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

valued  members,  who  have  aided  in  upbuilding  the  high  prestige 
and  furthering  the  prosperity  of  this  great  institution.  During  his 
identification  with  the  Board  of  Trade  Mr.  Comstock's  knowledge 
of  grain  and  conservative  dealing  has  commanded  the  respect  and 
confidence  of  every  grain  firm  in  the  trade,  and  his  name  in  con- 
nection with  any  transaction  has  always  been  considered  a  guar- 
antee for  straightforward  and  honorable  dealing.  He  is  a  man 
of  strong  convictions  of  what  is  right  and  wrong,  and  is  unfaltering 
in  his  opposition  to  a  course  which  he  deems  inimical  to  the  best 
interests  of  the  country  and  people.  His  tastes  are  scholarly  and  his 
manner  retiring,  and  he  finds  pleasure  in  travel,  golf  and  books. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Chicago,  Chicago  Golf  and  the  Edgewater 
Golf  clubs,  and  stands  high  in  both  social  and  business  circles.  A 
man  of  unusual  public  spirit,  interested  in  local  affairs  and  proud 
of  the  city  in  which  much  of  his  activities  and  mature  manhood 
have  been  passed,  Mr.  Comstock  is  a  strong  factor  in  the  further- 
ance of  any  measure  which  has  for  its  aim  the  advancement  of  the 
people  or  the  betterment  of  existing  conditions.  He  has  always 
been  deeply  interested  in  Chicago's  welfare,  and  at  all  times  his 
sympathy  and  support  has  been  with  the  measures  that  in  any  way 
benefit  the  western  metropolis.  To  sketch  in  detail  his  work  during 
his  active  business  life  would  be  a  task  of  no  small  moment,  how- 
ever agreeable  and  interesting.  Although  making  no  claim  to 
greater  credit  than  that  which  belongs  to  one  who,  by  wise  and 
persistent  effort,  has  advanced  his  own  fortune  and  at  the  same 
time  that  of  many  others  who  have  shared  in  one  way  or  another  in 
his  enterprises,  a  discriminating  public  sentiment  will  not  fail  to 
accord  him  a  front  rank  among  the  commercial  benefactors  of  the 
country. 

Morton  L.  Conley. — The  fine  old  Hoosier  State  has  been  repre- 
sented by  an  appreciable  and  valued  non-resident  but  loyal  quota 
of  members  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and 
prominent  among  the  number  at  the  present  time  is  Morton  L. 
Conley,  who  maintains  his  residence  and  business  headquarters  in 
the  attractive  little  city  of  Frankfort,  judicial  center  of  Clinton 
County,  Indiana,  and  who  is  one  of  the  discriminating  and  suc- 
cessful grain  men  operating  exclusively  on  the  floor  of  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade.  He  closed  out  his  general  grain  commission  busi- 
ness at  Frankfort  in  1915  and  has  since  confined  his  operations 
to  speculative  grain  business  on  the  floor  of  the  Board  of  Trade, 
as  previously  intimated.  His  operations  are  of  broad  scope  as  a 
buyer  and  speculator  along  normal  and  legitimate  lines  and  he  is 
conceded  to  be  one  of  the  most  successful  traders  of  the  great  com- 
mercial body  with  which  he  is  actively  affiliated  in  the  western 
metropolis.  Mr.  Conley  was  born  in  Campbell  County,  Virginia, 
November  13,  1866,  and  is  a  scion  of  an  old  and  well-known  family 
of  that  historic  commonwealth.     His  parents,  Christopher  M.  and 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  75 

Sarah  L.  (Adams)  Conley,  were  born  and  reared  in  the  Old 
Dominion  State,  where  the  father  became  a  substantial  and  pros- 
perous exponent  of  the  great  basic  industry  of  agriculture.  He  whose 
name  introduces  this  article  gained  his  early  education  in  the 
schools  of  his  native  State  and  as  a  young  man  he  there  evinced 
his  ambition  and  self-reliance  by  establishing  himself  in  the  grain 
and  feed  business  on  a  modest  scale.  His  energy  and  careful 
methods  enabled  him  to  build  up  a  prosperous  enterprise,  and  he 
continued  in  this  field  of  business  until  his  removal  to  Frankfort, 
Indiana,  in  1899.  At  Frankfort  he  developed  a  large  and  successful 
grain  commission  trade,  and  there  he  continued  his  operations 
until  1915,  when,  as  before  stated,  he  transferred  the  stage  of  his 
vigorous  business  activities  to  the  Board  of  Trade  in  Chicago,  of 
which  organization  he  had  become  a  member  in  1913.  He  and  his 
family  find  pleasure  in  still  maintaining  their  home  at  Frankfort, 
Indiana,  and  are  popular  factors  in  the  representative  social  life  of 
that  fine  little  city.  Reared  in  the  faith  of  the  Democratic  party, 
Mr.  Conley  has  never  deviated  from  the  line  of  close  allegiance 
thereto.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Frankfort  Lodge  of  the  Knights 
of  Pythias.  Mrs.  Conley  is  an  active  member  of  the  Baptist  church. 
In  1892  Mr.  Conley  wedded  Miss  Annie  Gertrude  Massie,  who 
likewise  was  born  and  reared  in  Virginia  and  whose  father,  Joseph 
H.  Massie,  was  a  prominent  and  influential  citizen  of  Amherst 
County,  that  State,  which  he  represented  for  several  terms  in 
the  Virginia  legislature.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Conley  have  five 
children,  namely:  J.  Page,  Charles  M.,  Claude,  Pearl  Elizabeth 
and  Frank  M. 

Horace  Cook. — As  the  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  Horace 
Cook  &  Co.,  one  of  the  largest  and  most  important  concerns  en- 
gaged in  the  commission  and  exporting  grain  trade  in  the  city  of 
Boston,  Mr.  Cook  has  naturally  and  consistently  desired  to  avail 
himself  of  the  privileges  and  functions  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  the  most  important  commercial  organization  of 
its  kind  in  the  world,  and  he  has  been  one  of  its  non-resident  mem- 
bers since  the  year  1911,  besides  which  he  is  one  of  the  prominent 
and  influential  members  of  the  Boston  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the 
firm  of  which  he  is  the  head  having  been  organized  by  him  on  the 
1st  of  January,  1917,  and  his  valued  partner  is  George  H.  Hopkins. 
He  has  been  actively  concerned  with  the  grain  business  in  the 
Massachusetts  metropolis  since  the  early  '80s  and  has  become  one 
of  its  leading  representatives  in  that  city,  his  success  and  prestige 
being  the  direct  result  of  his  own  ability  and  well  ordered  en- 
deavors. Horace  Cook  is  one  of  the  two  surviving  children  of 
Charles  A.  and  Caroline  (Hinckle)  Cook,  and  was  born  in  Boston, 
on  the  13th  of  July,  1859.  He  was  but  five  years  of  age  at  the  time 
of  his  father's  death,  but  was  not  denied  the  full  advantage  of  the 
schools  of  his  native  city.     As  a  youth  he  there  identified  himself 


76  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

with  the  retail  flour  business,  but  at  the  age  of  twenty-three  years 
he  turned  his  attention  to  the  grain  business,  of  which  he  has  be- 
come one  of  the  most  successful  and  influential  exponents  in  Bos- 
ton, his  firm  controlling  a  specially  substantial  grain  exporting  trade 
that  has  appreciably  been  augmented  by  the  demands  of  the 
nations  engaged  in  terrific  warfare  in  Europe.  He  maintains  his 
office  at  509  Chamber  of  Commerce  Building,  is  one  of  the  liberal 
and  public-spirited  citizens  of  Boston,  and  in  politics  is  found 
staunchly  arrayed  as  an  advocate  and  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the 
Republican  party. 

Allison  J.  Cope. — The  vigorous  and  progressive  city  of  Cham- 
paign, judicial  center  of  the  Illinois  county  of  the  same  name,  is  a 
normal  center  for  legitimate  enterprise  in  connection  with  the  great 
grain-producing  industry  in  central  Illinois,  and  on  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  finds  consistent  representation  in  the 
person  of  Mr.  Cope,  who  has  been  a  member  of  this  great  commer- 
cial body  since  1907,  in  which  year  he  established  his  present  sub- 
stantial and  prosperous  business  as  a  grain  and  commission  mer- 
chant at  Champaign,  the  firm  of  Lamson  Brothers  &  Co.  being  his 
official  correspondents  in  Chicago.  Allison  J.  Cope  is  one  of  the 
numerous  men  whom  the  Hawkeye  State  has  given  to  the  Board  of 
Trade,  for  Iowa  has  contributed  both  grain  and  brain  to  the  Chi- 
cago market.  He  was  born  in  Coal  Creek  Township,  Keokuk 
County,  Iowa,  on  the  13th  of  August,  1860,  of  typical  American 
parentage  and  ancestry.  His  father,  Henry  Cope,  was  born  in 
Fayette  County,  Pennsylvania,  in  1837.  He  was  a  carpenter  and 
farmer,  and  was  one  of  the  many  who  took  Horace  Greeley's  advice, 
even  before  it  was  given,  as  he  went  to  the  West  in  1856  and  set- 
tled in  the  little  pioneer  village  of  New  Sharon,  Iowa.  The  mother, 
Sarah  (Gray)  Cope,  was  of  like  sturdy  stock.  She  was  born  at 
Barnesville,  Ohio,  in  1841.  To  this  happy,  industrious,  frugal  home, 
the  news  of  the  secession  and  the  war  for  the  Union  was  not  only 
a  National  but  also  a  personal  disaster.  But  the  father  did  not  refuse 
to  offer  his  services  and,  if  need  be,  his  life  for  his  country.  He 
left  his  young  wife  and  their  infant  son  to  enlist  in  Company  D, 
Thirty-third  Iowa  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  proceeded  with  his 
regiment  to  the  front.  In  those  first  days  of  the  war,  through  lack 
of  preparedness  and  proper  sanitary  provisions,  thousands  of  Union 
soldiers  fell  victim  to  disease.  Henry  Cope  was  one  of  these,  and, 
after  six  months  of  service,  he  received  his  honorable  discharge, 
returned  home  in  broken  health  and  took  up  the  struggle  for  exist- 
ence. Despite  this  handicap  the  family  prospered,  and  the  parents 
were  able  to  give  their  son  not  only  the  education  provided  by  the 
public  and  high  schools  of  Sharon,  but  also  to  round  out  his  train- 
ing with  a  course  of  three  years  at  the  famous  Oberlin  College,  in 
Ohio.  They  were  amply  repaid  by  filial  solicitude  and  the  success 
of  their  son,  and  they  are  now  enjoying  the  fruits  of  well-spent 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  77 

lives  in  their  pleasant  home  at  Danville,  Illinois.  Allison  J.  Cope 
began  the  real  work  of  life  as  a  telegrapher.  His  skill,  intelligence, 
and  education  soon  procured  him  promotion,  and  for  thirteen  years 
he  served  as  train  dispatcher — first  with  the  Iowa  Central  Railroad, 
now  known  as  the  Minneapolis  &  St.  Louis,  and  later  with  the 
Illinois  Central  Railroad,  on  the  line  between  Chicago  and  Cham- 
paign. For  three  years  he  was  engaged  in  the  retail  grocery  busi- 
ness at  Urbana,  Illinois,  and  it  was  not  until  1903  that  he  established 
himself  in  the  grain  business.  He  was  at  first  an  employe,  but  in 
1907  he  entered  business  for  himself,  and  this  he  has  successfully 
continued  to  the  present  day.  In  politics  Mr.  Cope  is  a  Republican, 
but,  while  active  in  the  support  of  the  principles  of  the  party,  he 
has  never  been  an  office-seeker.  He  and  his  wife  are  ardent  mem- 
bers of  the  Christian  Science  church,  and  their  lives  measure  up 
to  the  high  standards  set  by  that  creed.  Mr.  Cope  is  a  man  of 
genial  and  kindly  disposition.  His  business  integrity  has  stood  the 
test  of  years  without  a  question,  and  he  has  attained  an  enviable 
reputation  among  his  associates  as  a  man  of  successful  business 
sagacity  and  of  utmost  probity.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Benevolent 
&  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  Travelers'  Protective  Associa- 
tion. June  15,  1893,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Cope  to  Mrs. 
Clara  (Fleming)  Baird,  daughter  of  Jesse  and  Matilda  (Havens) 
Fleming,  of  Champaign,  and  the  two  children  of  this  union  are 
Harold  F.,  born  February  19,  1899,  and  Allison  J.,  Jr.,  born  June 
16,  1902. 

Ira  J.  Couch. — A  native  son  of  Chicago  and  a  representative  of 
one  of  the  prominent  and  influential  families  of  this  city,  Ira  John- 
son Couch  is  a  son  of  George  B.  and  Caroline  E.  Couch,  and  a 
grandson  of  Ira  Couch,  whose  name  is  closely  and  influen- 
tially  linked  with  the  annals  of  civic  and  material  development  and 
progress  in  Chicago.  The  Board  of  Trade  claims  Ira  J.  Couch  as 
one  of  its  appreciative  and  valued  members,  and  he  is  one  of  the 
interested  principals  in  the  representative  firm  of  S.  B.  Chapin  & 
Co.,  one  of  the  foremost  in  the  stock-investment  business  in  both 
Chicago  and  New  York  and  one  that  has  definite  precedence  and 
influence  in  connection  with  the  operations  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of 
the  City  of  Chicago  and  the  Chicago  Stock  Exchange,  with  both  of 
which  important  bodies  Mr.  Couch  is  actively  identified,  besides 
which  he  is  to  be  designated  as  an  able  member  of  the  bar  of  his 
native  city,  though  he  has  not  been  actively  engaged  in  the  practice 
of  his  profession  since  1900.  Mr.  Couch  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the 
21st  of  June,  1871,  and  after  making  good  use  of  the  advantages 
aflforded  in  the  public  schools  of  the  western  metropolis  he  pursued 
a  higher  academic  course  in  Beloit  College,  at  Beloit,  Wisconsin. 
In  preparation  for  his  chosen  profession  he  then  entered  the  Chi- 
cago College  of  Law,  and  in  this  institution  he  was  graduted  as  a 
member  of  the  class  of  1896,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws, 


78  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

his  admission  to  the  Illinois  bar  having  been  a  virtual  concom- 
itant of  his  reception  of  the  degree  noted.  After  his  graduation 
Mr.  Couch  became  associated  with  the  representative  law  firm  of 
Arnd  &  Arnd,  with  which  he  continued  his  alliance  until  1900, 
when  he  retired  from  the  practice  of  law  and  turned  his  attention 
to  the  stock  and  bond  business,  of  which  he  has  become  a  success- 
ful representative  in  Chicago,  as  has  he  also  in  connection  with 
operations  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  At  the  initiation  of  his  activities 
along  these  lines  he  was  fortunate  in  identifying  himself  with  the 
firm  of  S.  B.  Chapin  &  Co.,  and  of  the  same  he  has  been  a  member 
since  1906.  Though  he  has  manifested  no  ambition  for  political 
preferment,  Mr.  Couch  as  a  public-spirited  citizen  takes  a  lively 
interest  in  all  that  touches  the  well-being  of  his  native  city.  In 
the  time-honored  Masonic  fraternity  he  has  received  the  thirty- 
second  degree  of  the  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  and  he  holds 
membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club,  the  Chicago  Golf  Club 
and  the  Glen  View  Golf  Club.  In  1902  was  solemnized  the  mar- 
riage of  Mr.  Couch  to  Miss  Genevra  Laing,  of  Chicago,  and  they 
have  three  children — Ira  Laing,  Mary  Elizabeth  and  Johnson. 

Thomas  C.  Craft,  Jr. — The  year  1916  recorded  the  enrollment 
of  the  name  of  Mr.  Craft  on  the  membership  rolls  of  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade,  and  this  great  and  influential  commercial  organ- 
ization thus  incidentally  gained  the  recognition  of  one  of  the  leading 
grain  receiving  and  importing  concerns  in  the  city  of  Baltimore, 
the  Baltimore  Grain  Company,  of  which  Mr.  Craft  became  Vice- 
President  in  1915.     The  important  corporation  likewise  is  repre- 
sented in  membership  in  the  Baltimore  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the 
New  York  Produce  Exchange,  and  the   Grain  Dealers'   National 
Association.     The   other   executive   officers   of   the   company   are 
Ferdinand  A.  Meyer,  who  is  its  President,  and  Edward  T.  Sheil, 
Jr.,  who  is  its  Treasurer.    Thomas  C.  Craft,  Jr.,  was  born  at  Wil- 
mington, North  Carolina,  on  the  18th  of  December,  1872,  and  is  a 
son  of  Thomas  C.  and  Lucy  (Greer)  Craft,  the  father  having  been 
for  many  years  connected  in  an  official  capacity  with  the  Tidewater 
Power  Company  at  Wilmington,  North  Carolina.    Thomas  C.  Craft, 
Jr.,  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  for  his  early 
education  and  has  been  identified  with  the  grain  trade  since  he  was 
a  youth  of  eighteen  years,  his  initial  experience  having:  begun  in 
1891,  and  his  residence  having  been  established  in  Baltimore.     In 
this  city  he  was  connected  with  various  commission  firms  for  vary- 
ing intervals  until  he  became  associated  with  the  Baltimore  Grain 
Company,  of  which  he  has  been  Vice-President  since  1915,  as  pre- 
viously stated.     His  advancement  has  been  the  result  of  abihty, 
close  application  and  determined  purpose,  and  he  has  become  one 
of  the  prominent  and  influential  exponents  of  the  grain  commercial 
interests  in  Baltimore.    His  political  support  is  given  to  the  Demo- 
cratic party,  he  is  identified  with  various  civic  and  social  organiza- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  79 

tions  of  representative  order,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of 
the  Universalist  church.  Mr.  Craft  was  married  to  Miss  Caroline 
B.  Etheredge,  a  daughter  of  James  Etheredge,  of  Baltimore,  and 
the  one  child  of  this  union  is  Philip  C. 

Charles  S.  Crary. — A  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City 
of  Chicago  for  nearly  thirty  years,  Mr.  Crary  has  won  for  himself 
a  place  as  one  of  the  successful  captains  of  industry  in  Illinois,  and 
this  fact  becomes  patent  when  it  is  stated  that  he  is  President  of 
the  Streator  Grain  Company  and  also  of  the  C.  S.  Crary  Company, 
corn  packers,  at  Streator,  LaSalle  County.  He  is  thus  the  execu- 
tive head  of  two  of  the  most  important  industrial  and  commercial 
concerns  of  the  city  of  Streator,  and  his  record  in  the  business 
world  has  been  one  of  worthy  achievement  and  consecutive  ad- 
vancement. 

He  was  born  in  Ohio,  on  November  14,  1865,  and  is  a  son  of 
Willis  and  Hester  (Robbins)  Crary,  his  father  having  devoted 
practically  his  entire  active  life  to  the  basic  industry  of  agriculture, 
in  connection  with  which  he  achieved  definite  independence  and 
prosperity.  He  died  in  1909,  his  wife  having  preceded  him  to  eter- 
nal rest.  Charles  S.  Crary  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  for  his 
early  education,  which  included  the  curriculum  of  the  high  school, 
and  he  initiated  his  business  career  by  entering  the  employ  of  the 
firm  of  Hall  &  Ross,  engaged  in  the  grain  business  at  Gibson  City, 
Ford  County,  Illinois.  Upon  severing  his  association  with  this  firm 
he  associated  himself  with  the  William  Bodman  Company,  which 
was  then  established  in  the  grain  trade  in  Chicago,  and  this  alliance 
continued  for  years.  Thereafter  he  became  independently  iden- 
tified with  the  canning  or  corn-packing  business  at  Hoopeston  and 
Gibson  City,  and  in  1892  he  established  at  Streator  the  now  exten- 
sive enterprise  conducted  under  the  title  of  the  C.  S.  Crary  Com- 
pany. In  the  packing  of  corn  this  company  has  developed  a  re- 
markably prosperous  and  well-ordered  commercial  enterprise,  and 
the  "Sweetheart"  brand  of  corn  that  is  manufactured  by  the  com- 
pany has  gained  a  demand  in  all  sections  of  the  Union.  In  the  well- 
equipped  factory  employment  is  given  to  an  average  force  of  one 
hundred  persons,  and  it  may  well  be  understood  that  in  connection 
with  this  enterprise  Mr.  Crary  makes  profitable  use  of  the  privileges 
of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  has  been  a  member 
since  1888.  The  Streator  Grain  Company,  of  which  he  is  Presi- 
dent, was  organized  and  incorporated  in  the  autumn  of  1916,  and 
has  already  become  an  important  concern  in  the  general  grain  trade 
in  LaSalle  and  adjoining  counties.  In  politics  Mr.  Crary  pays  un- 
faltering allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  his  attitude  being  that 
of  a  broad-gauged  and  progressive  citizen  and  man  of  affairs.  He 
is  affiliated  with  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  the  Benevolent  &  Pro- 
tective Order  of  Elks,  and  with  his  family  holds  to  the  faith  of  the 
Presbyterian  church.     Mr.  Crary  was  wedded  to  Miss  Julia  Jones, 


80  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

a  daughter  of  the  late  Joseph  Jones,  of  Henry,  Illinois,  and  there  are 
five  children  of  this  union. 

James  Crighton.^In  preparing  a  review  of  the  lives  of  men 
whose  careers  have  been  of  signal  usefulness  and  honor  to  the 
country,  no  name  is  more  worthy  of  mention  in  the  history  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  than  that  of  the  late  James 
Crighton,  for  many  years  a  prominent  business  man  of  this  city, 
and  for  more  than  thirty-six  years  an  active  and  honored  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade.  His  deep  interest  in  humanity  constituted  a 
potent  factor  in  the  moral  progress  of  Chicago,  and  even  though  he 
has  passed  from  the  scene  of  earthly  activities  his  labors  remain  as 
a  force  for  good  in  the  community.  He  not  only  achieved  notable 
success  in  business,  but  in  his  home,  in  social  and  public  life,  he  was 
kind  and  courteous,  and  no  citizen  of  Chicago  vC^as  more  respected 
or  enjoyed  the  confidence  of  the  people  or  more  richly  deserved  the 
regard  in  which  he  was  held.  Mr.  Crighton  was  born  in  Long- 
forgan,  Perthshire,  Scotland,  in  March,  1851,  a  son  of  William  and 
Elizabeth  (Duncan)  Crighton,  and  he  fully  exemplified  the  mag- 
nanimous character  for  which  the  Scotch  race  have  always  been 
noted.  His  scholastic  attainments  were  those  afforded  by  the  public 
schools  of  his  native  land,  in  which  he  acquired  a  substantial  educa- 
tion. The  fame  of  the  future  metropolis  of  the  West,  which  seemed, 
not  unnaturally,  to  have  extended  abroad,  drew  many  ambitious 
young  men  like  himself  to  Chicago,  and  when  sixteen  years  of  age 
he  decided  to  cast  his  lot  with  this  city.  It  was  in  1867  that  he 
started  to  carve  out  a  career  here  for  and  by  himself,  and  thence- 
forward his  life  and  enterprises  were  blended  with  the  growth  of 
the  most  wonderful  product  of  the  country's  western  civilization. 
Coming  to  Chicago  and  entering  business  life  when  a  boy,  Mr. 
Crighton  grew  up  with  the  city  during  the  period  of  its  most  mar- 
velous development,  and  through  pluck,  perseverance  and  honorable 
dealing  he  became  one  of  its  substantial  and  most  valued  citizens. 
Soon  after  becoming  a  resident  of  this  city  he  entered  the  employ 
of  Low  Brothers  &  Co.,  who  had  established  a  grain  commission 
business  here  in  1856,  and  his  entire  business  career  was  afterward 
devoted  to  the  interests  of  that  house  and  its  successors.  Low 
Brothers  &  Co.  was  later  succeeded  by  John  Crighton  &  Co.  (John 
Crighton  and  Sanford  A.  Scribner),  which  afterward  became  Crigh- 
ton &  Scribner,  and  on  the  death  of  John  Crighton,  his  uncle,  James 
Crighton,  in  1887,  became  a  partner  of  Mr.  Scribner,  under  the  title 
of  Scribner,  Crighton  &  Co.  Mr.  Scribner  died  in  1901,  but  the 
business  was  conducted  under  the  same  name  until  December, 
1903,  when  the  firm  of  Crighton  &  Co.  was  organized.  This  con- 
nection continued  until  1909,  when  the  firm  name  was  changed  to 
Crighton  &  Lasier,  which  continued  to  do  an  extensive  grain,  seed 
and  provision  business.  Mr.  Crighton  became  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  October  24,  1881,  and  during  his  entire  business 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  81 

career  was  one  of  the  active  members  of  this  organization,  of  which 
he  was  a  Director.  He  was  also  a  member  of  the  Milwaukee  Cham- 
ber of  Commerce,  and  served  on  many  important  committees  of 
both  organizations.  Although  the  scope  of  his  work  in  connection 
with  his  business  was  always  broad,  Mr.  Crighton  also  gave  close 
consideration  to  the  educational,  religious  and  missionary  problems 
of  the  city,  and  for  many  years  was  one  of  the  prime  movers  in 
that  important  work.  He  was  especially  interested  in  Sunday 
school  work,  and  was  one  of  the  leading  lights  of  Erie  Chapel  of  the 
Third  Presbyterian  Church,  in  which  he  was  an  elder  for  many 
years.  He  was  also  deeply  interested  in  the  Chicago  Foundlings' 
Home,  and  was  one  of  the  trustees  of  that  institution.  His  kind 
heart  and  sympathetic  nature  were  evident  in  all  matters  tending 
to  the  public  good  and  he  was  ever  active  in  furthering  useful,  help- 
ful and  elevating  institutions.  During  his  identification  with  the 
business  interests  of  Chicago,  he  also  reached  a  broad  field  of  activ- 
ity and  usefulness,  and  at  all  times  his  sympathy  and  support  was 
with  the  measures  that  in  any  way  benefited  the  city.  In  business 
life  he  was  alert,  sagacious  and  reliable ;  as  a  citizen  he  was  honor- 
able, prompt  and  true  to  every  engagement,  and  his  death,  which 
occurred  February  17,  1917,  removed  from  Chicago  one  of  its  most 
valued  citizens.  In  August,  1882,  Mr.  Crighton  was  united  in  mar- 
riage with  Miss  Minnie  Wade  Hanna,  of  Chicago,  a  daughter  of 
William  J.  and  Jane  (Wilson)  Hanna,  pioneers  of  this  city,  and 
they  became  the  parents  of  two  sons ;  Charles  Hanna,  who  died 
December  1,  1915,  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  was 
one  of  the  active  members  of  the  organization.  The  youngest  son, 
James  Millar  Crighton,  is  also  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade, 
and  is  numbered  among  Chicago's  most  enterprising  and  conserva- 
tive young  men,  being  a  trusted  employe  of  the  firm  of  Pope  & 
Eckhardt,  commission  merchants.  Mrs.  Crighton,  like  her  hus- 
band, is  active  in  all  good  work,  and  is  a  woman  of  exceptional 
mental  capacity  and  much  beauty  of  character.  She  has  long  taken 
a  deep  interest  in  church  work,  and  is  greatly  admired  for  her 
sterling  qualities  ^nd  social  and  philanthropic  activities.  Mr. 
Crighton  was  a  Mason  of  high  standing,  being  identified  with 
Blair  Lodge,  No.  393,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  a  life  member  of  York  Chap- 
ter, and  a  member  of  Columbia  Commandery  and  Medina  Temple. 
He  was  a  life  member  of  the  Art  Institute  of  Chicago,  and  was  also 
identified  with  the  Westward  Ho  Golf  Club.  Although  he  had 
many  warm  friends  and  was  prominent  in  social  circles,  he  was 
devoted  to  the  pleasures  of  home  life,  and  his  happiest  moments 
were  always  spent  at  his  own  fireside.  He  found  pleasure  in  pro- 
moting the  welfare  of  his  wife  and  children,  and  was  a  loving 
husband  and  an  indulgent  father.  The  originality  and  profound 
grasp  of  his  intellect  command  respect,  and  yet  these  were  not  all 
of  the  man.     In  every  relation  of  life  were  shown  the  light  that 


82  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

comes  from  justness,  generosity,  truth,  high  sense  of  honor,  proper 
respect  for  self  and  a  sensitive  thoughtfulness  for  others.  What  a 
magnificent  legacy  such  a  man  leaves  to  the  generations  who  shall 
come  after  him. 

Franklin  M.  Crosby. — Pertinent  to  the  great  grain  industry  of 
the  United  States  it  is  to  be  noted  that  there  exists  a  specially  close 
and  important  reciprocal  relationship  between  the  cities  of  Chicago 
and  Minneapolis,  the  former  being  the  world's  center  of  the  com- 
mercial phases  of  the  grain  business  and  the  metropolis  of  Minne- 
sota being  the  greatest  of  the  world's  flour  manufacturing  centers, 
as  well  as  a  point  to  which  incidentally  must  needs  tend  much  of  the 
movement  from  the  great  grain-producing  districts  of  the  North- 
west.   The  alliance  between  the  two  cities  is  significantly  furthered 
in  this  line  by  the  fact  that  many  of  the  leading  representatives  of 
the  great  flour-milling  concerns  of  Minneapolis  conserve  commer- 
cial expediency  by  retaining  membership  in  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  the  City  of  Chicago,  even  as  do  also  many  of  the  prominent  and 
influential  exponents   of  the   grain   business   in    Minneaplis.     The 
Board  of  Trade  thus  gains  much  through  claiming  as  one  of  its 
active  members  Franklin  M.  Crosby,  who  is  a  Director  of  the  world- 
renowned  Washburn-Crosby  Company,  which  owns  and  operates 
in  Minneapolis  the  largest  flouring  mills  in  the  world,  the  status  of 
the  same  being  such  that  there  is  no  necessity  of  attempting  any 
detailed  description  within  the  necessarily  limited  confines  of  this 
review.     It  may,  however,  be  stated  in  an  incidental  way  that  the 
daily  capacity  of  the  Washburn-Crosby  mills  is  for  the  output  of 
forty  thousand  barrels  of  flour.    Mr.  Crosby  has  been  a  member  of 
the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  since  1915,  and  is  likewise  one  of  the 
influential   members  of  the   Minneapolis   Chamber  of  Commerce. 
Franklin  M.  Crosby  was  born  in  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  on  the 
11th  of  January,  1879,  and  is  one  of  the  three  children  of  John  and 
Ollie  (Muzzy)  Crosby..  John  Crosby,  son  of  John  and  grandson  of 
John  Crosby,  was  a  scion  of  one  of  the  prominent  colonial  families 
of  New  England  and  was  born  at  Hampden,  Penobscot  County, 
Maine,  November  1,  1829.    He  was  reared  and  educated  in  the  Pine 
Tree  State  and  in  1877  he  established  his  residence  in  Minneapolis, 
where  he  became  one  of  the  leading  exponents  of  the  great  flour 
manufacturing  industry  which  has  made  the  name  of  the  city  famous 
throughout  the  civilized  world.    He  was  at  the  time  of  his  death  the 
President  of  the  Washburn-Crosby  Company,  which  purchased  and 
assumed  control  of  the  celebrated  mills  that  had  been  established  by 
the  late  Governor  John  S.  Washburn,  and  of  this  executive  office  he 
continued  the  incumbent  until  his  death,  December  29,  1888,  at  the 
age  of  fifty-nine  years.    John  Crosby,  a  man  of  splendid  character 
and  fine  ability,  gained  prestige  as  one  of  the  captains  of  industry 
in  the  West  and  in  all  of  the  relations  of  life  honored  a  name  that 
has   been    worthily   identified    with    American    history    since    the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  83 

colonial  era.  To  the  excellent  public  schools  of  his  native  city 
Franklin  M.  Crosby  is  indebted  for  his  early  educational  discipline, 
and  virtually  his  entire  business  career  has  been  marked  by  his  close 
and  effective  association  with  the  great  industrial  corporation  of 
which  he  is  now  a  Director  and  of  which  his  elder  brother,  John 
Crosby  IV.,  is  President,  his  active  connection  with  the  business  of 
the  Washburn-Crosby  Company  having  had  its  inception  in  the  year 
1897.  He  has  proved  himself  well  fortified  for  the  responsibilities 
that  devolve  upon  him  as  one  of  the  leading  business  men  and  citi- 
zens of  the  Minnesota  metropolis,  and  his  membership  on  the 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade  makes  it  a  privilege  to  accord  to  him  this 
recognition  in  the  history  of  that  great  commercial  organization. 
In  politics  he  gives  his  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  and  he 
and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  Mr.  Crosby 
was  married  to  Miss  Clara  McKnight,  a  daughter  of  Samuel  T. 
McKnight,  of  Minneapolis,  and  they  have  seven  children. 

Albert  E.  Cross. — Another  of  the  native  sons  of  Illinois  who 
has  gained  prominence  and  influence  in  connection  with  the  com- 
mission trade  in  Chicago  and  as  a  progressive  and  valued  member 
of  the  Board  of  Trade,  is  Albert  Eugene  Cross.  Mr.  Cross  was 
born  in  the  city  of  Aurora,  Kane  County,  Illinois,  on  the  6th  of 
March,  1870,  and  is  a  son  of  Professor  J.  George  Cross  and  Evalina 
(Perry)  Cross,  his  father  having  attained  to  marked  distinction  as  a 
representative  of  the  pedagogic  profession  and  having  been  promi- 
nent in  connection  with  educational  affairs  in  Illinois  and  more 
especially  as  author  of  the  shorthand  system  known  as  the  "Cross 
Eclectic."  He  whose  name  initiates  this  review  gained  his  earlier 
education  in  the  public  schools  of  Aurora  and  Bloomington,  Illinois, 
and  later  had  the  privilege  of  continuing  his  studies  in  the  royal 
gymnasiums  of  the  cities  of  Berlin  and  Leipzig,  Germany.  His 
facility  as  a  stenographer  gained  to  him  his  first  employment  after 
he  had  established  his  residence  in  Chicago,  but  his  ability  and 
ambition  did  not  long  permit  him  to  serve  in  subordinate  position. 
He  profited  by  the  valuable  experiences  of  every-day  life  and 
pressed  forward  to  the  goal  of  his  ambition,  with  the  result  that  he 
eventually  became  a  successful  factor  in  the  provision  business  and 
through  the  medium  of  which  he  has  gained  success  that  is  worthy 
the  name  and  that  marks  him  as  one  of  the  representative  members 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago.  His  membership  in 
this  great  organization  of  the  western  metropolis  dates  from  the 
year  1895,  and  that  he  has  taken  a  lively  and  loyal  interest  in  its 
government  and  general  activities  is  indicated  emphatically  by  the 
fact  that  he  has  been  called  upon  to  serve  as  a  Director  and  also  as 
Vice-President  of  the  Board.  In  his  independent  business  associ- 
ations he  was  for  years  a  member  of  the  well-known  firm  of  Ells- 
worth &  Cr9ss,  lately  succeeded  by  Cross,  Roy  &  Saunders,  incor- 
porated, an  influential  concern  in  the  commission  trade  of  Chicago, 


84  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

with  offices  at  140  West  Van  Buren  street.  Mr.  Cross  is  a  member 
of  the  Union  League  Club  of  Chicago  and  of  the  LaGrange  Country 
Club,  and  is  a  staunch  advocate  of  the  cause  of  the  Republican 
party.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  active  members  of  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church,  and  they  reside  at  LaGrange,  Illinois.  The  mar- 
riage of  Mr.  Cross  to  Miss  Fannie  Ferre  was  solemnized  October 
16,  1896,  and  they  have  no  children. 

Henry  Parsons  Crowell. — Among  the  active  business  men  of 
Chicago  today  who  have  established  a  reputation  for  integrity  and 
achieved  honorable  success  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  none  are  more 
worthy  of  mention  in  a  work  of  this  character  than  Henry  P. 
Crowell,  President  of  the  Quaker  Oats  Company.  His  rise  to  dis- 
tinction is  the  result  of  his  own  efforts,  and  his  career  demonstrates 
what  a  man  can  do  if  he  has  pluck  and  perseverance.  He  was  born 
in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  January  27,  1855,  a  son  of  Henry  L.  and  Anna 
(Parsons)  Crowell,  and  the  public  schools  of  that  city  and  Greylock 
Institute,  South  Williamstown,  Massachusetts,  aiTorded  his  educa- 
tion. In  1881  he  became  President  of  the  Quaker  Mill  Company,  at 
Ravenna,  Ohio,  and  filled  that  position  until  June,  1891,  when  that 
company  was  sold  to  the  American  Cereal  Company,  of  Akron, 
Ohio,  of  which  he  was  made  Vice-President  and  General  Manager. 
His  ability  was  soon  demonstrated  and  his  proficiency  acknowl- 
edged, in  February,  1898,  by  promotion  to  the  Presidency,  a  position 
he  has  since  filled.  Upon  the  organization  of  the  Quaker  Oats 
Company,  of  which  he  was  one  of  the  founders,  he  was  made  Presi- 
dent, and  has  since  filled  this  position.  He  is  also  Vice-President 
of  the  Cleveland  Foundry  Company,  and  his  progressive  spirit  is 
evident  in  many  ways.  Although  the  scope  of  his  work  in  various 
business  interests  have  always  been  broad.  Mr.  Crowell  has  also 
been  active  in  church  and  educational  affairs  for  many  years,  and 
has  been  one  of  the  prime  movers  in  all  good  work.  As  trustee  of 
the  McCormick  Theological  Seminary  and  President  of  the  Board 
of  Trustees  of  Moody  Bible  Institute  and  chairman  of  the  Laymen's 
Evalgehstic  Council,  his  eiTorts  have  given  decided  impetus  to  the 
work  and  his  labors  have  gained  him  distinction  both  at  home  and 
abroad  In  business  life  he  has  reached  a  broad  field  of  activity  and 
usefulness,  and  no  citizen  of  Chicago  is  more  deeply  interested  in 
the  material,  intellectual  and  moral  progress  of  the  city.  As  a  busi- 
ness man  he  is  alert,  sagacious  and  reliable,  and  his  labors  have  not 
only  been  an  element  in  promoting  his  own  success,  but  have  also 
constituted  a  potent  factor  in  the  development  of  business.  His 
influence  is  all  the  more  efficacious  from  the  fact  that  it  is  moral 
rather  than  political,  and  is  exercised  for  the  public  weal  as  well  as 
for  personal  ends.  In  his  religious  faith  he  is  a  Presbyterian,  while 
in  political  affiliation  he  is  a  Republican,  though  is  independent,  and 
always  casts  the  weight  of  his  influence  in  support  of /"^^  ^J^ 
measures  working  for  the  public  good.     He  is  a  member  of  the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  85 

Chicago,  Onwentsia,  Union  League,  Skokie  and  Indian  Hill  Clubs, 
and  is  also  a  member,  and  the  present  President  of  the  Committee 
of  Fifteen,  a  civic  organization  for  the  prevention  of  panderism  and 
commercial  vice.  From  May,  1913,  to  May,  1916,  he  was  a  member 
of  the  Executive  Commission  of  the  Presbyterian  Church  of  the 
United  States  of  America.  His  membership  in  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade  dates  from  April  13,  1899.  By  his  marriage  with  Susan 
Coleman,  of  Cleveland,  Ohio,  Mr.  Crowell  became  the  father  of  one 
son,  Henry  C.  He  also  has  a  daughter,  Anna  B.  (Mrs.  Dr.  Fred- 
erick C.  Herrick,  of  Cleveland,  Ohio),  by  a  former  marriage  with 
Lillie  A.  Wick,  deceased.  The  family  home  for  many  years  has 
been  at  Winnetka,  Illinois.  It  is  a  hospitable  one,  where  good  cheer 
abounds,  and  where  their  many  friends  are  always  welcome.  Al- 
though unostentatious  in  manner,  Mr.  Crowell  is  recognized  as  a 
man  of  earnest  purpose  and  progressive  principles.  He  has  always 
stood  for  the  things  that  are  right,  and  for  the  advancement  of  citi- 
zenship, and  is  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  modern  improve- 
ments along  material,  intellectual  and  moral  lines.  His  career  is 
one  of  which  he  has  reason  to  be  proud,  for  never  was  a  man's  suc- 
cess due  more  to  his  own  native  ability  and  less  to  outward  circum- 
stances. Nothing  came  to  him  by  chance.  He  has  reaped  only 
where  he  sowed,  and  the  harvest  with  its  valued  aftermath  came 
to  him  alone  through  energy,  industry  and  perseverance.  He 
reached  his  high  position  through  no  favors  of  influential  friends, 
but  worked  his  way  up  from  the  bottom  rung  of  the  business  ladder 
by  sheer  pluck  and  marked  ability,  and  his  achievements  are  the 
merited  reward  of  earnest,  honest  efTorts. 

Robert  F.  Cummings. — When  the  history  of  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade  and  her  prominent  men  shall  have  been  written,  its  pages 
will  bear  no  name  more  worthy  than  that  of  the  late  Robert  Fowler 
Cummings,  of  this  city.  Although  two  years  have  passed  since  he 
was  called  to  his  final  rest,  he  lives  in  the  memory  of  his  friends  as 
the  highest  type  of  a  loyal  citizen  and  an  honorable,  conscientious 
man.  His  love  of  principle  and  strength  of  character  gained  for  him 
the  respect  of  all  with  whom  he  came  in  contact,  and  his  humane 
sympathy  and  charities  brought  men  to  him  in  the  ties  of  strong 
friendship.  During  his  active  career  in  Chicago,  which  covered 
nearly  half  a  century,  he  reached  a  broad  field  of  activity  and  use- 
fulness, and  no  citizen  of  this  community  had  in  larger  measure  the 
esteem  of  his  fellows  nor  exerted  a  stronger  influence  for  the  ad- 
vancement of  citizenship.  Mr.  Cummings  was  born  in  North  Ox- 
ford, Massachusetts,  June  17,  1848,  the  only  son  of  Abel  B.  and 
Emily  (Fowler)  Cummings.  He  was  five  years  of  age  when  his 
parents  came  to  Illinois,  and  his  early  education  was  obtained  in 
the  public  schools  of  Wenona.  He  later  became  a  student  in  Lake 
Forest  Academy,  and  also  received  private  instructions  from  his 
father,  who  had  been  an  educator  at  Granville,  Illinois.     His  en- 


86  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

trance  into  business  was  under  excellent  preceptorship,  for  while 
still  a  youth  he  was  associated  with  the  firms  of  B.  Fowler  and 
E.  S.  Fowler  &  Co.,  the  gentlemen  in  each  firm  being  his  uncles. 
He  combined  in  rare  degree,  in  his  business  qualifications  and  his 
standards  of  life,  those  characteristics  which  make  for  success  in  its 
truest  and  best  form.  He  achieved  a  name  and  position  in  the  busi- 
ness world  that  few  men  of  his  time  and  locality  have  gained.  With 
honor  and  without  animosity  he  fought  his  way  through  the 
supreme  contests  of  commercial  transactions  in  which  only  the 
fittest  survive.  His  career  was  one  that  redounds  to  his  credit  and 
places  his  name  high  in  the  estimation  of  his  fellow  men.  While  in 
the  employ  of  B.  Fowler  Mr.  Cummings  worked  for  one  year  on 
the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  and  in  1870  he  acquired  a  one-third 
interest  in  the  dry  goods  establishment  of  E.  S.  Fowler  &  Co.,  at 
Wenona,  Illinois,  where  he  continued  in  mercantile  pursuits  for 
seven  years.  In  August,  1877,  the  firm  sold  out  and  Mr.  Cummings 
removed  to  Clifton,  Iroquois  County,  Illinois,  where  he  established 
himself  in  a  modest  way  in  a  grain  and  coal  enterprise.  Energy, 
sagacity  and  straightforward  business  tactics  resulted  in  developing 
this  venture  to  large  proportions  and  he  eventually  became  the 
owner  of  elevators  at  Clifton,  Oilman,  Chebanse,  Irwin,  Martinton, 
Papineau,  Pittwood,  all  in  Iroquois  County,  Illinois,  and  at  Otto 
and  St.  Anne,  in  Kankakee  County,  Illinois.  These  elevators  fur- 
nished a  total  storage  capacity  of  1,000,000  bushels  of  grain,  and 
besides  this  enterprise  he  also  conducted  a  retail  coal  business  at 
each  elevator.  In  1903  the  business  was  incorporated  under  the 
firm  name  of  the  R.  F.  Cummings  Grain  Company,  with  Mr.  Cum- 
mings as  President.  The  firm  was  capitalized  for  $90,000,  of  which 
Mr.  Cummings  owned  85  per  cent  of  the  stock.  He  continued  as 
the  executive  head  of  this  vast  business  until  the  time  of  his  demise, 
and  also  had  numerous  other  holdings,  which  included  3,500  acres  of 
fine  land  in  Illinois  and  2,500  acres  in  Iowa,  the  Vice-Presidency 
of  the  Hyde  Park  State  Bank  of  Chicago,  a  general  grain  business 
on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  a  private  banking  business  at  Clif- 
ton, and  directorships  in  the  Grain  Dealers'  National  Fire  Insurance 
Company  of  Indianapolis,  the  First  Trust  &  Savings  Bank  of  Wat- 
seka,  Iroquois  County,  Illinois,  and  the  Martinton  State  Bank  of 
Martinton.  In  1898  Mr.  Cummings  removed  with  his  family  to 
Chicago  and  located  at  No.  5135  Dorchester  avenue,  Hyde  Park. 
The  same  qualities  which  had  won  him  standing  and  friendships  at 
Clifton  soon  attracted  to  him  a  wide  circle  of  friends,  both  in  busi- 
ness and  social  life,  and  when  his  death  occurred  suddenly, 
December  31,  1914,  there  were  left  scores  in  his  new  locality  to 
mourn  his  loss.  His  funeral,  at  Clifton,  was  more  largely  attended 
than  any  similar  event  in  the  history  of  the  city.  It  is  rare  that  one 
finds  in  the  present-day  struggle  for  supremacy  in  business  an 
individual  who  combines  ability  in  commercial  transactions  with 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  87 

a  love  for  the  aesthetic.  Mr.  Cummings  was  such  a  man.  He  was 
blessed  with  an  appreciation  of  the  beautiful  in  nature  and  art. 
Because  of  his  donation  in  collections  from  the  Philippine  Islands, 
he  was  made  one  of  the  five  honorary  members  of  the  Field  Colum- 
bian Museum  of  Chicago.  He  was  a  life  member  of  the  Art  Insti- 
tute of  Chicago  and  a  member  and  Director  of  the  Chicago  Geo- 
graphical Society.  His  various  social  connections  included  a  life 
membership  in  the  Hamilton  Club  of  Chicago.  He  was  a  member 
also  of  the  South  Shore  Country  Club,  the  Chicago  Athletic  Associ- 
ation and  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade.  Although  not  a  politician, 
he  regarded  public  service  as  a  stern  responsibility,  and  when  called 
upon  to  serve  as  mayor  of  Clifton  did  so  cheerfully  and  conscien- 
tiously, and  with  such  ability  that  he  was  retained  in  that  office 
for  ten  years.  On  July  6,  1874,  Mr.  Cummings  was  united  in  mar- 
riage to  Miss  Mary  A.  Marston,  of  Onarga,  Iroquois  County,  Illi- 
nois, and  they  became  the  parents  of  six  children :  Lenora ;  Marion 
Marston  (Mrs.  Ralph  C.  Stevens,  of  Glen  Ridge,  New  Jersey) ; 
Florence  (wife  of  Thomas  J.  Hair,  of  Chicago)  ;  Irene,  who  per- 
ished in  the  Iroquois  Theater  fire,  December  30,  1903;  Austin  Ben- 
jamin, who  died  in  infancy,  and  Marston. 

Although  unostentatious  in  manner,  Mr.  Cummings  was  recog- 
nized as  a  man  of  earnest  purpose  and  advanced  ideas.  He  always 
stood  for  the  things  that  were  right,  and  for  the  advancement  of 
citizenship  and  was  interested  in  everything  that  pertained  to  mod- 
ern improvements  along  material,  intellectual  and  moral  lines.  His 
career  was  without  a  blemish,  and  is  one  of  which  his  family  have 
reason  to  be  proud.  In  his  home,  in  social  and  in  business  circles, 
he  was  kind  and  courteous,  and  no  citizen  of  Chicago  was  more 
respected  or  enjoyed  the  confidence  of  the  people  or  more  richly 
deserved  the  regard  in  which  he  was  held.  Although  active  in 
business  and  social  life,  Mr.  Cummings'  strongest  interests  were 
centered  in  his  home.  He  was  devoted  to  the  pleasures  of  home  life 
and  his  happiest  moments  were  always  spent  at  his  own  fireside. 
He  found  pleasure  in  promoting  the  welfare  of  his  wife  and  children, 
and  was  a  loving  husband  and  an  indulgent  father.  The  originality 
and  profound  grasp  of  his  intellect  command  respect,  and  yet  these 
were  not  all  of  the  man.  In  every  relation  of  life  were  shown  the 
light  that  comes  from  justness,  generosity,  truth,  high  sense  of 
honor,  proper  respect  for  self  and  a  sensitive  thoughtfulness  for 
others.  What  a  magnificent  legacy  such  a  man  leaves  to  the  gener- 
ations who  shall  come  after  him. 

Theodore  E.  Cunningham. — Controlling  a  substantial  and  im- 
portant brokerage  business  in  the  handling  of  stocks,  bonds,  grain 
and  cotton,  the  well-known  firm  of  Harris,  Winthrop  &  Co.,  of  which 
Mr.  Cunningham  is  a  member,  maintains  a  status  of  no  little  priority 
in  connection  with  these  lines  of  enterprise  in  the  city  of  Chicago, 
and  to  upholding  the  high  prestige  and  furthering  the  expansion  of 


88  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

the  business  of  this  representative  firm  Mr.  Cunningham  has  con- 
tributed in  large  degree  since  he  identified  himself  with  the  concern 
in  1907.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  1898, 
and  his  popularity  and  influence  in  connection  with  the  activities  of 
this  great  commercial  body  are  indicated  by  his  incumbency  in  1916 
of  the  ofifice  of  member  of  its  Board  of  Directors.  In  one  of  his 
characteristic  post-prandial  addresses  Hon.  Chauncey  M.  Depew 
gave  voice  to  the  following  curious  metaphrase  of  a  familiar  quota- 
tion :  "Some  men  are  born  great,  some  achieve  greatness,  and  some 
are  born  in  Ohio."  Under  the  final  clause  of  this  category  Theodore 
Ellis  Cunningham  can  claim  prestige,  for  he  was  born  at  Lima,  the 
judicial  center  of  Allen  County,  Ohio,  on  the  7th  of  August,  1868,  a 
son  of  Theodore  E.  and  Elizabeth  (Hyatt)  Cunningham.  He  gained 
his  youthful  scholastic  discipline  in  the  public  schools,  and  later 
he  entered  the  service  of  J.  F.  Harris  &  Co.,  stock,  bond  and  grain 
brokers,  in  the  ofifice  of  the  concern  in  the  city  of  Omaha,  Nebraska. 
About  two  years  later  he  was  transferred  to  the  firm's  Chicago  head- 
quarters, and  he  continued  his  active  association  in  this  connection 
until  1898,  when  he  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and 
also  assisted  in  the  organization  of  the  corporation  of  Harris,  Scotten 
Company,  of  which  he  became  Secretary  and  Treasurer.  His  busi- 
ness alliance  with  J.  F.  Harris  has  been  virtually  consecutive  during 
the  entire  period  of  his  business  career,  and  he  has  been  since  1907 
a  member  and  valued  executive  of  the  firm  of  Harris,  Winthrop  & 
Co.,  which  maintains  offices  both  in  New  York  and  Chicago,  and 
which  is  represented  on  the  stock  exchanges  of  both  of  these  metro- 
politan centers.  Though  emphatically  loyal  and  progressive  in  his 
civic  attitude  and  taking  a  deep  interest  in  public  affairs,  Mr.  Cun- 
ningham is  independent  of  strict  partisan  lines  in  politics.  He  and 
his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church,  and  he  is 
identified  with  numerous  Chicago  social  organizations  of  represen- 
tative order,  including  the  Chicago  Club,  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club, 
the  Glen  View  Golf  Club,  and  the  Evanston  Country  Club,  the  fine 
suburban  city  of  Evanston  being  his  place  of  residence.  On  the  4th 
of  October,  1894,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Cunningham 
to  Miss  Harriet  Whiteman,  and  they  have  one  daughter — Mary 
Elizabeth. 

John  F.  L.  Curtis. — A  constituent  member  of  one  of  the  promi- 
nent and  substantial  commission  firms  represented  on  the  Board  of 
Trade,  Mr.  Curtis  is  another  of  the  native  sons  of  Chicago  who 
are  playing  worthy  and  important  parts  in  the  city's  industrial  and 
commercial  life  and  in  the  activities  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  which 
he  has  been  a  member  since  1901,  with  secure  place  in  the  confi- 
dence and  good  will  of  its  other  members.  He  has  had  a  long  and 
varied  experience  in  connection  with  the  grain  and  stock  brokerage 
business  and  as  a  representative  of  the  same  has  maintained  a 
high  reputation.    He  is  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Clement,  Curtis  & 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  89 

Co.,  and  of  its  senior  member,  Allan  M.  Clement,  specific  mention 
is  made  on  other  pages  of  this  work.  This  progressive  firm,  firmly 
established  in  control  of  a  large  commission  business  in  stocks  and 
grain,  has  membership  not  only  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City 
of  Chicago,  but  also  upon  the  Chicago  Stock  Exchange,  the  New 
York  Produce  Exchange,  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange,  the  New 
York  Cotton  Exchange,  the  New  York  Cofifee  Exchange  and  the 
New  Orleans  Cotton  Exchange — alliances  that  indicate  the  broad 
scope  of  its  operations.  Mr.  Curtis  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the 
20th  of  December,  1865,  and  is  a  son  of  John  F.  and  Harriet  S. 
(Wilson)  Curtis,  his  father  having  become  identified  with  Chicago 
business  interests  at  a  time  when  the  city  gave  slight  indication  or 
promise  of  developing  into  the  great  metropolis  of  the  present  day. 
He  whose  name  introduces  this  article  is  indebted  to  the  public 
schools  of  Chicago  for  his  early  educational  training,  and  during  the 
greater  part  of  the  first  decade  of  his  business  career  as  a  young 
man  he  was  in  the  employ  of  the  wholesale  grocery  house  of  Frank- 
lin MacVeagh  &  Co.,  which  has  long  been  known  as  one  of  the  great 
commercial  concerns  lending  prestige  to  Chicago.  In  1901  the  firm 
of  Kneeland,  Clement  &  Curtis  was  formed  and  was  succeeded  in 
1907  by  the  present  firm  of  Clement,  Curtis  &  Co.  The  business  has 
been  continued  successfully  under  the  most  effective  auspices  and 
careful  and  able  control  on  the  part  of  aggressive  and  steadfast  busi- 
ness men,  each  of  broad  experience  in  the  domain  of  commerce  and 
industrial  enterprise.  In  the  upbuilding  of  this  substantial  business 
Mr.  Curtis  has  played  an  important  part  and  he  merits  consistent 
classification  among  the  representative  business  men  of  his  native 
city.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  Republican  party,  and 
he  is  a  loyal  and  popular  member  of  the  Union  League,  the  Chicago 
Athletic  and  the  Exmoor  Country  clubs,  his  residence  being  in  the 
beautiful  suburb  of  Highland  Park.  In  June,  1897,  Mr.  Curtis 
wedded  Miss  Frances  E.  Witbeck,  and  they  have  two  children,  John 
Guernsey  and  Dorothy  Frances. 

Seabury  Davies. — The  city  of  Baltimore,  Maryland,  is  not  lack- 
ing in  prominent  representation  on  the  membership  rolls  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  has  such  distinction  in 
no  secondary  way  through  the  membership  of  Mr.  Davies,  who  is 
junior  member  of  the  well-known  and  important  banking  and 
brokerage  firm  of  Poe  &  Davies,  in  which  his  partner  is  Philip  L. 
Poe.  This  is  one  of  the  prominent  concerns  of  the  kind  in  Balti- 
more, where  its  offices  are  at  the  corner  of  Fayette  and  Calvert 
streets,  and  the  firm  is  represented  also  in  membership  on  the  New 
York  Stock  Exchange,  the  Baltimore  Stock  Exchange  and  the  Amer- 
ican Bankers'  Association.  Mr.  Davies  takes  just  pride  in  reverting 
to  the  historic  Old  Dominion  State  as  the  place  of  his  birth,  and  to 
the  fact  that  he  is  a  scion  of  one  of  its  old  and  honored  families,  his 
parents   having   passed    their   entire    lives   in   Virginia,    where   his 


90  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

father  was  a  successful  planter  for  many  years  prior  to  his  death, 
which  occurred  in  1884.  Seabury  Davies  was  born  in  Virginia,  on 
the  8th  of  November,  1880,  and  is  a  son  of  John  F.  and  Caroline  W. 
(Smith)  Davies.  Mr.  Davies  attended  the  excellent  schools  of  his 
native  State  until  he  had  availed  himself  fully  of  the  advantages  of 
the  high  school,  and  he  early  began  to  depend  largely  on  his  own 
resources.  He  became  a  clerk  in  the  offices  of  E.  N.  Morrison, 
engaged  in  business  in  Baltimore,  and  he  remained  thus  engaged 
until  1898.  Since  1904  he  has  been  here  actively  and  successfully 
engaged  in  the  banking  and  brokerage  business  and  his  rise  has 
been  achieved  entirely  through  his  own  ability,  energy  and  well 
ordered  endeavors,  the  firm  of  Poe  &  Davies  having  been  formed  in 
1908  and  the  alliance  having  proved  a  most  effective  medium  for  the 
development  of  a  substantial  and  prosperous  business  which  in- 
cludes a  large  commission  trade  in  grain,  so  that  the  firm  consist- 
ently finds  representation  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  the 
membership  of  Mr.  Davies  dating  from  the  year  1908.  In  politics 
Mr.  Davies  was  reared  in  the  faith  of  the  Democratic  party,  to 
which  he  has  ever  given  unfaltering  allegiance,  and  in  his  home  city 
he  is  a  member  of  various  representative  civic  and  social  organiza- 
tions, including  the  Baltimore  Club  and  the  Baltimore  Country 
Club.  Mr.  Davies  was  married  to  Miss  Harrison,  who  likewise 
was  born  and  reared  in  Virginia,  a  member  of  one  of  its  old  and 
distinguished  families.  She  is  a  daughter  of  the  Hon.  Thomas  W. 
Harrison,  who  is  representing  the  Winchester,  Virginia,  district  in 
the  United  States  Congress  in  1917,  and  who  is  one  of  the  most 
prominent  and  influential  members  of  the  Winchester  bar,  besides 
having  served  with  distinction  on  the  bench,  and  he  is  known  as  a 
leading  lawyer  and  jurist  of  Virginia. 

Minthome  M.  Day. — He  whose  name  introduces  this  review 
first  became  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  in  the  year 
1897,  and  has  been  identified  with  the  grain  trade  from  the  time  of 
initiating  his  business  career  when  he  was  a  youth.  He  has  become 
well  known  as  one  of  the  successful  and  influential  representatives 
of  this  important  line  of  enterprise  in  both  Illinois  and  Iowa,  his 
activities  as  a  grain  commission  merchant  having  been  of  broad 
scope  and  importance.  He  is  now  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Simons, 
Day  &  Co.,  which  maintains  headquarters  in  Chicago,  besides  five 
other  offices  in  Illinois  and  four  in  Iowa,  his  place  of  residence  being 
at  Earlville,  LaSalle  County,  Illinois,  where  is  situated  one  of  the 
offices  of  his  firm.  In  view  of  the  fact  that  Mr.  Day's  father,  the  late 
Minthorne  Day,  had  been  for  fully  a  quarter  of  a  century  one  of  the 
extensive  grain  dealers  of  Illinois,  as  well  as  an  honored  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  for  many  years,  it  is  pleasing  to  note  the  suc- 
cess and  precedence  which  the  son  has  gained  in  the  same  connec- 
tions. Minthorne  M.  Day  was  born  at  Peru,  LaSalle  County,  Illi- 
nois, on  the   14th  of  May,  1876,  and  is  a  son  of  Minthorne  and 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  91 

Caroline  M.  (Stockdale)  Day,  the  former  of  whom  died  in  1903  and 
the  latter  of  whom  still  survives.  The  public  schools  of  his  native 
county  afforded  to  Minthorne  M.  Day  his  youthful  educational  ad- 
vantages, and  immediately  after  leaving  school  he  became  associ- 
ated with  his  father's  grain  business,  so  that  he  has  virtually  grown 
up  in  the  domain  of  commercial  and  industrial  enterprise  in  which 
he  is  now  found  to  be  a  prominent  and  successful  operator.  He  made 
the  best  use  of  the  opportunities  presented,  applied  himself  diligently 
and  energetically  and  his  alert  mentality  enabled  him  to  absorb 
and  assimilate  the  varied  and  detailed  knowledge  which  he  gained 
at  each  successive  stage  of  progress.  He  has  shown  marked  re- 
sourcefulness as  an  extensive  representative  of  the  grain  business 
throughout  the  fine  agricultural  districts  of  Illinois  and  Iowa  and  his 
connection  with  the  business  in  these  two  States  has  been  inter- 
rupted but  once — when  he  passed  two  years  in  States  of  the  extreme 
West.  He  was  formerly  a  member  of  the  firm  of  MacKenzie  & 
Day,  which  conducted  a  large  volume  of  business  in  the  grain  com- 
mission trade  and  the  Chicago  offices  of  which  were  maintained  in 
the  Continental  &  Commercial  National  Bank  Building.  He  be- 
came a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago  in  1897.  By 
mutual  consent  the  firm  of  MacKenzie  &  Day  was  dissolved  on  the 
2d  of  December,  1916,  and  Mr.  Day  then  became  one  of  the  organ- 
izers of  the  present  representative  commission  firm  of  Simons, 
Day  &  Co.,  to  the  affairs  of  which  he  is  giving  his  close  and  able 
attention.  Outside  of  the  Chicago  office  the  firm  employs  a  large 
corps  of  men,  and  the  business  is  one  of  large  volume  and  controlled 
according  to  the  highest  code  of  commercial  ethics  and  with  the 
most  progressive  of  executive  policies.  As  a  loyal  and  public- 
spirited  citizen  Mr.  Day  is  found  aligned  as  a  staunch  supporter 
of  the  principles  of  the  Republican  party,  he  and  his  wife  are  mem- 
bers of  the  Presbyterian  church  at  Earlville,  and  he  is  affiliated  with 
the  Benevolent  &  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  In  the  year  1903  Mr. 
Day  wedded  Miss  Cordelia  Fuller,  a  daughter  of  N.  J.  Fuller,  of 
Berea,  Ohio,  and  the  two  children  of  this  union  are  Mildred  M. 
and  Minthorne  M.,  Jr. 

Winfield  S.  Day. — At  the  last  annual  election  of  the  Board  of 
Trade,  Winfield  Scott  Day  was  elected  a  member  of  its  Directorate, 
for  a  term  of  three  years — 1917-18-19.  He  has  signalized  at  all 
times  his  deep  interest  in  and  appreciation  of  the  Board  of  Trade, 
and  as  a  Director  of  the  same  finds  opportunity  for  exemplifying 
this  loyalty  in  effective  service.  In  his  activities  as  a  grain  com- 
mission merchant,  Mr.  Day  is  Secretary  and  a  Director  of  Simons, 
Day  &  Co.,  of  which  firm  he  was  one  of  the  organizers  and  incorpo- 
rators on  December  1,  1916.  He  has  literally  builded  the  ladder 
on  which  he  has  risen  to  a  plane  of  influence  in  this  line  of  business 
enterprise  to  be  an  official  of  the  greatest  commercial  body  of  its 
kind  in  the  world — as  his  initial  service  was  in  the  capacity  of  errand 


92  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

boy  for  the  old  established  Board  of  Trade  firm  of  William  H. 
Beebe  &  Co.  He  later  gained  cumulative  valuable  experience 
through  his  alliance  in  more  responsible  positions  with  several  of 
the  largest  commission  houses  and  shipping  firms  represented  on 
the  Board  of  Trade.  From  1898  to  1902  he  was  associated  with 
Churchill  &  Co.,  after  which  he  was  connected  with  Logan  & 
Bryan  until  1906.  Mr.  Day  was  engaged  in  the  real  estate  busi- 
ness for  several  months,  but  his  long  association  with  the  grain 
trade  had  promoted  an  allegiance  which  was  not  thus  easily  to  be 
broken,  and  in  1907  he  connected  himself  with  the  firm  of  Pringle, 
Fitch  &  Rankin,  which  alliance  he  maintained  until  1913.  In  1914 
he  formed  a  partnership  with  John  F.  MacKenzie,  and  engaged  in 
the  independent  commission  business,  under  the  firm  title  of  Mac- 
Kenzie &  Day.  This  alliance  obtained  until  the  latter  part  of  1916, 
and  in  December  of  the  same  year  he  became  one  of  the  organizers 
and  incorporators  of  Simons,  Day  &  Co.  Mr.  Day's  ability  and 
experience  in  the  grain  business  make  him  a  potent  force  in  the 
development  and  advancement  that  are  making  the  record  of  the 
new  concern,  and  which  are  destined  to  give  it  a  position  of  prom- 
inence and  influence  in  connection  with  the  activities  of  the  Board 
of  Trade.  He  is  the  son  of  Minthorne  M.  and  Caroline  (Stockdale) 
Day,  and  was  born  September  20,  1880,  at  Peru,  111.  Mr.  Day  was 
married  to  Imelda  Grace  Boyle  on  April  10,  1901,  and  they  have 
three  children — Clarisse  L.,  Virginia  J.  and  Winfield  Scott,  Jr.  He 
is  affiliated  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  and  the  Royal  Arcanum, 
and  is  identified  with  the  Union  League  Club,  the  Chicago  Automo- 
bile Club  and  the  Elmhurst  Golf  Club. 

Eugene  H.  de  Bronkart. — A  popular  and  representative  mem- 
ber enlisted  as  one  of  the  younger  generation  of  aggressive,  vital 
and  successful  factors  on  the  roster  of  the  Board  of  Trade  is  he 
whose  name  initiates  this  paragraph  and  who  has  proved  a  resource- 
ful and  successful  figure  in  connection  with  stock  operations,  and 
he  is  an  interested  principal  in  the  well-known  firm  of  Ferry,  Price 
&  Co.,  with  offices  at  131  South  LaSalle  street.  Mr.  de  Bronkart 
was  born  in  the  city  of  Denver,  Colorado,  December  27,  1888,  and 
is  a  son  of  Gustave  C.  de  Bronkart.  His  father  was  born  at  Brus- 
sels, Belgium,  and  as  a  citizen  of  the  United  States  has  given  his 
attention  principally  to  diplomatic  service.  Eugene  H.  de 
Bronkart  received  the  best  of  educational  advantages  in  his  boy- 
hood and  youth,  and  after  a  course  in  Lake  Forest  Academy,  at 
Lake  Forest,  a  suburb  of  Chicago,  he  was  matriculated  in  fine  old 
Williams  College,  in  Massachusetts,  in  which  institution  he  was 
graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  as  a  member  of  the 
class  of  1912.  His  business  career  had  its  inception  in  Chicago 
and  has  been  one  of  close  association  with  the  successful  handling 
of  stocks  and  bonds,  the  while  he  has  been  since  1913  an  active 
and  popular  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.     Appreciative  of  the 


^S^,c^^ywv^(:^<^^^?^o^^,-^ 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  93 

finer  amenities  and  associations  of  social  life,  Mr.  de  Bronkart  has 
became  actively  identified  with  representative  civic  organizations 
in  Chicago,  including  the  University  Club,  the  Casino  Club,  and  the 
Exmoor  Country  Club.  He  holds  membership  also  in  the  Adiron- 
dack League,  the  Williams  University  Club  of  New  York  City,  and 
the  Chi  Psi  college  fraternity.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  communi- 
cants of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church,  in  which  they  are  mem- 
bers of  the  fine  old  Trinity  church,  on  Michigan  boulevard,  at 
Twenty-sixth  street.  On  the  22d  of  January,  1916,  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  de  Bronkart  to  Miss  Eleanor  V.  G.  Davies,  of 
New  York  City. 

Arthur  G.  Delany.— Nearly  twenty  years  of  active  and  prac- 
tical association  with  the  grain  commission  trade  in  Chicago  have 
given  to  Arthur  Gibbs  Delany  varied  and  fortuitous  experience  in 
this  domain  of  industrial  and  commercial  enterprise,  and  he  is  one 
of  the  loyal  and  popular  brokers  represented  on  the  Board  of  Trade, 
of  which  he  has  been  a  member  since  1901.  He  was  for  three  years 
connected  with  the  Weare  Grain  Company,  and  for  ten  years  there- 
after he  was  associated  with  the  prominent  Board  of  Trade  firm 
of  Logan  &  Bryan.  Upon  severing  this  alliance  he  became  one  of 
the  executive  principals  in  the  commission  firm  of  Thomson  & 
McKinnon,  which  maintains  offices  not  only  in  Chicago,  but  also 
in  the  city  of  Indianapolis,  Indiana.  Mr.  Delany  is  known  as  a 
resourceful  and  vigorous  trader  on  'Change  and  is  one  of  the  popu- 
lar members  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  In  politics  Mr.  Delany  gives 
his  allegiance  to  the  Democratic  party.  He  and  his  wife  are  com- 
municants of  the  Catholic  church.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Knights 
of  Columbus,  and  he  holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic 
Club,  the  Germania  Club,  and  the  Westmoreland  Country  Club. 
January  21,  1903,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Delany  to 
Miss  Delia  C.  Williamson,  and  the  two  children  of  this  union  are 
Arthur  G.  and  Mary  Kathryn.  Reverting  to  the  earlier  stages  in 
the  life  history  of  Mr.  Delany,  it  may  be  noted  that  he  was  born  in 
the  city  of  Baltimore,  Maryland,  May  20,  1877,  and  that  he  is  a  son 
of  James  H.  and  Julia  Delany.  In  his  native  city  he  was  afforded 
the  advantages  of  St.  Patrick's  Academy,  and  later  he  attended  the 
high  school  at  Joliet,  Illinois,  in  which  city  his  parents  had  estab- 
lished their  home.  His  early  business  experience  was  gained  as 
a  telegraph  operator,  and  in  this  connection  he  was  employed  in 
turn  by  the  Western  Union  Telegraph  Company  and  the  Postal 
Telegraph  Company.  It  was  through  these  associations  that  he 
first  became  interested  in  the  affairs  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and, 
taking  advantage  of  opportunities,  he  made  his  way  forward  to  the 
goal  of  success  in  connection  with  the  commission  grain  business. 

Frank  J.  Delany. — All  who  have  had  occasion  to  come  in  even 
comparatively  close  touch  with  Frank  Joseph  Delany  have  had 
occasion  to  realize   that  his  personality  is  expressed   in   specially 


94  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

intense  individuality,  and  this  individuality  has  "grown  by  what 
it  fed  on" — from  the  time  when  he  exercised  the  stern  prerogatives 
of  a  practical  newspaper  man  up  through  his  progressive  course  to 
his  present  status  as  one  of  the  well-known,  prominent  and  influen- 
tial representatives  of  the  cash  grain  operations  on  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  of  which  important  commercial  organ- 
ization he  has  been  an  appreciative  and  popular  member  since  1907. 
His  influence  in  connection  with  the  Board  of  Trade  has  been 
directed  along  varied  channels,  and  to  him  special  distinction  ap- 
plies through  his  initiation  and  able  advocacy  of  the  "harmony" 
idea,  which,  in  1914,  brought  about  an  end  of  the  strife  and  con- 
flicting activities  between  cash  grain  interests  on  the  Board  of 
Trade.  He  has  represented  the  Board  at  various  conventions  and 
conferences  of  important  order  and  has  served  with  characteristic 
loyalty  and  efficiency  as  a  member  of  various  committees  of  the 
Board.  Mr.  Delany  is  essentially  and  emphatically  a  man  of 
thought  and  action,  and  his  civic  ideals  are  of  the  highest  and  most 
practical  type,  as  shown  in  definite  work  achieved  by  him.  With 
broad  and  well-fortified  views  concerning  the  value  of  and  demand 
for  adequate  water  transportation  facilities  as  a  medium  through 
which  to  advance  industrial  and  commercial  prosperity,  especially 
in  the  improving  of  the  internal  facilities  of  this  kind,  he  has  been 
active  and  influential  in  connection  with  the  deep  waterway  affairs 
in  Illinois.  Before  the  State  legislature  he  has  appeared  repeatedly 
in  behalf  of  the  commercial  interests  of  the  Illinois  Valley  as 
affected  by  the  Illinois  and  Michigan  Canal,  and  he  has  otherwise 
been  a  consistent  and  earnest  supporter  of  movements  tending  prop- 
erly to  advance  commercial  transportation  interests  through  the 
medium  of  waterways  that  are  now  partially  or  entirely  neglected. 
Mr.  Delaney  is  a  broad-gauged  and  progressive  citizen,  but  has 
never  sought  or  held  political  office.  The  independent  business 
career  of  Mr.  Delany  virtually  had  its  inception  when  he  became 
a  buyer  of  grain  at  Ladd,  Bureau  County,  Illinois,  where  he  con- 
tinued his  activities  along  this  line  of  enterprise  from  1893  to  1895. 
He  then  became  city  editor  of  the  Daily  Democrat  at  LaSalle, 
Illinois,  but  journalism  did  not  long  restrict  that  individuality  which 
has  demanded  a  vigorous  play  at  all  stages  of  his  career.  In  1896 
Mr.  Delany  came  to  Chicago,  and  for  the  ensuing  nine  years  he  held 
the  position  of  traveling  representative  for  the  prominent  grain 
commission  concern  of  Nash-Wright  Company.  In  1904  he  became 
Vice-President  of  the  Nash-Ferguson  Grain  Company,  at  Kansas 
City,  and  later  he  assumed  the  dual  office  of  Vice-President  and 
Manager  of  the  Elwood  Grain  Company,  at  St.  Joseph,  Missouri, 
in  which  city  he  continued  his  activities  until  1907,  when  he  re- 
turned to  Chicago  and,  fortified  by  broad  and  varied  experience, 
became  associated  with  the  commission  firm  of  J.  C.  Shaffer  &  Com- 
pany, the  forming  of  this  alliance  being  practically  simultaneous 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  95 

with  his  becoming  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  In  1908  Mr. 
Delany  engaged  in  the  commission  trade  in  an  individual  way.  His 
recognized  energy  and  ability,  have  brought  to  him  importance 
as  one  of  the  well-informed  and  active  grain  merchants  on  the 
Board  of  Trade.  He  is  at  the  present  time  President  and  Manager 
of  the  Cragin  Elevator  Company,  the  extensive  elevators  of  which 
are  located  at  Cragin,  a  virtual  suburb  of  Chicago,  and  is  also  Presi- 
dent and  Manager  of  the  Cragin  Products  Company,  of  Chicago. 
In  1902-3  Mr.  Delany  was  an  unofficial  representative  of  the  United 
States  Department  of  Agriculture  in  an  interesting  and  profitable 
trip  to  Argentina,  South  America,  and  in  this  connection  he  wrote 
and  submitted  to  the  Government  a  confidential  report  on  grain 
conditions  and  grain  commercial  methods  and  systems  in  that  im- 
portant country.  He  also  wrote  a  specially  valuable  work,  entitled 
"Argentina  from  a  Grain  Man's  Point  of  View,"  and  this  work, 
published  in  book  form,  is  now  found  in  nearly  all  commercial 
libraries  of  importance,  both  in  this  country  and  abroad.  At  Kan- 
sas City,  Missouri,  on  the  19th  of  June,  1907,  was  solemnized  the 
marriage  of  Mr.  Delany  to  Miss  Estil  Marion  Wood,  and  they  have 
three  children — Cicely,  Frank  and  Richard.  Mr.  Delany  is  a  native 
son  of  Illinois,  his  birth  occurring  at  Peru,  November  2,  1875.  He 
attended  the  public  and  parochial  schools,  supplementing  this  by  a 
course  of  study  at  St.  Bede's  College,  Peru,  Illinois,  in  which  he 
was  graduated  in  1893  with  the  degree  of  Master  of  Accounts. 

J.  Murdoch  Dennis. — The  grain  commission  trade  in  the  city 
of  Baltimore,  Maryland,  has  a  progressive  and  successful  exponent 
in  the  person  of  Mr.  Dennis,  who  is  associated  in  business  with 
A.  R.  Dennis,  under  the  firm  name  of  Dennis  &  Co.  and  with  offices 
in  the  building  of  the  Baltimore  Chamber  of  Commerce,  in  which 
the  firm  has  membership.  He  whose  name  introduces  this  article 
is  known  as  one  of  the  vital,  loyal  and  successful  young  business 
men  of  his  native  city,  and  consistency  was  observed  when,  in  1910, 
he  enrolled  his  name  on  the  membership  records  of  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade,  his  alliance  in  this  respect,  as  coupled  with  his 
character  and  achievement,  marking  him  as  definitely  eligible  for 
representation  in  this  history.  Mr.  Dennis  was  born  in  Baltimore 
on  the  15th  of  April,  1882,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Anna  (Murdoch) 
Dennis.  John  Dennis  was  numbered  among  the  influential  mem- 
bers of  the  bar  in  the  city  of  Baltimore,  attained  to  distinction  in 
the  exacting  profession  of  his  choice,  and  was  one  of  the  leading 
lawyers  of  the  Monument  City  at  the  time  of  his  death,  in  Sep- 
tember, 1916.  J.  Murdoch  Dennis  had  the  fortuitous  advantages  of 
a  home  of  signal  culture  and  refinement,  and  thus  was  fostered  an 
ambition  that  made  him  profit  fully  by  the  privileges  afiforded  in 
the  public  schools  of  his  native  city.  After  leaving  the  high  school 
he  entered  into  business  affairs  in  a  subordinate  way,  and  his  ad- 
vancement has  been  compassed  through  his  ambitious  and  deter- 


96  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

mined  purpose  and  diligent  application,  increasing  responsibilities 
having  at  all  stages  found  him  prepared  for  their  assumption.  His 
connection  with  the  grain  commission  business  had  its  beginning 
many  years  ago,  and  the  firm  of  which  he  is  now  a  member  was 
virtually  established  in  1910.  He  and  his  able  partner  have  devel- 
oped a  substantial  commission  business,  and  are  known  as  promi- 
nent and  influential  commission  merchants  in  the  State  of  Mary- 
land, their  offices  being  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  Building,  and 
a  corps  of  efficient  assistants  being  retained  in  the  handling  of  the 
various  details  of  the  business.  Mr.  Dennis  gives  loyal  support  to 
the  cause  of  the  Democratic  party,  and  both  he  and  his  wife  are 
communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church.  Mr.  Dennis 
was  married  to  Miss  Louise  Haskins,  a  daughter  of  Richard  Has- 
kins,  of  Baltimore,  and  they  are  popular  factors  in  the  social  life 
of  their  home  city. 

The  Albert  Dickinson  Company. — The  glory  of  our  American 
republic  is  in  the  perpetuation  of  individuality  and  in  according  the 
utmost  scope  for  individual  achievement.  The  nation  has,  almost 
spontaneously,  produced  men  of  the  finest  mental  caliber,  of  true 
virile  strength  and  of  vigorous  purpose.  Not  always  has  the  cradle 
been  one  of  pampered  luxury,  but  the  modest  couch  of  infancy  has 
often  rocked  future  greatness.  The  self-made  man  is  distinctively 
a  product  of  America,  and  the  record  of  accomplishment  in  this  indi- 
vidual sense  is  the  record  which  the  true  and  loyal  American  holds 
in  highest  honor.  These  statements  are  distinctly  apropos  of  the 
life  history  of  Albert  Dickinson,  who  as  a  citizen  and  man  of  affairs 
has  written  his  name  large  on  the  history  of  Chicago.  Not  the  least 
of  his  achievements  in  the  domain  of  practical  business  and  com- 
mercial activity  has  been  the  upbuilding  of  the  splendid  enterprise 
that  perpetuates  his  name — that  of  the  Albert  Dickinson  Company, 
whose  is  one  of  the  largest  seed  houses  in  the  world,  this  great  con- 
cern having  direct  representation  on  the  membership  roster  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  through  such  association  on 
the  part  of  a  number  of  the  officers  and  stockholders  of  the  company. 
The  reflex  of  so  great  an  industrial  enterprise  upon  the  commercial 
status  of  the  city  in  which  are  maintained  its  headquarters  can  not  be 
overestimated,  and  in  noting  the  loyal  and  appreciative  efforts  of 
those  who  have  been  strong  forces  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  great 
metropolis  on  the  shores  of  Lake  Michigan,  there  is  imperative  con- 
sistency in  giving  generous  recognition  to  the  pioneer  citizen,  gal- 
lant soldier  and  honored  and  steadfast  captain  of  industry  who  was 
President  of  the  important  corporation  that  bears  his  name  and  of 
whom  the  following  well-merited  estimate  has  been  given :  "The 
story  of  his  life,  in  its  successful  achievement  where  difficulties  and 
obstacles  have  seemed  to  serve  but  as  an  impetus  to  renewed  efifort, 
is  one  marked  by  interest,  incentive  and  inspiration."  Albert  Dick- 
inson is  a  scion  of  one  of  the  sterling  old  colonial  famliies  of  New 


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OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  97 

England  and  in  his  youth  he  imbibed  deeply  of  the  spirit  of  loyalty 
and  patriotism  that  led  him  in  later  years  to  go  forth  in  defense 
of  the  Union  when  the  integrity  of  the  nation  was  jeopardized 
through  armed  rebellion.  He  was  born  at  Stockbridge,  Berkshire 
County,  Massachusetts,  on  the  28th  of  October,  1841,  and  in  western 
Massachusetts  were  likewise  born  his  parents,  Albert  F.  and  Ann 
Eliza  (Anthony)  Dickinson,  the  latter  of  whom  was  an  aunt  of 
that  noble  and  distinguished  woman,  the  late  Susan  B.  Anthony. 
In  1854  Albert  F.  Dickinson  came  to  Chicago,  where  his  family 
joined  him  in  the  following  year,  and  he  became  one  of  the  pioneer 
exponents  of  the  grain  and  produce  business  in  the  future  metrop- 
olis, which  was  then  little  more  than  a  straggling  village,  though  not 
lacking  in  commercial  ambition  and  prestige.  He  thus  became  the 
virtual  founder  of  the  business  that  was  the  nucleus  around  which 
has  been  developed  the  present  great  enterprise  conducted  under  the 
corporate  title  of  the  Albert  Dickinson  Company.  It  is  worthy  of 
special  note  that  in  1855  Albert  F.  Dickinson  shipped  to  the  eastern 
market  the  first  carload  of  wheat  ever  sent  forth  from  Chicago,  and 
also  that  he  became  one  of  the  pioneer  members  of  the  Board  of 
Trade,  on  which  he  purchased  his  seat  for  the  sum  of  five  dollars. 
He  met  with  heavy  losses  at  the  time  of  the  great  Chicago  fire  of 
1871  and  retired  from  active  business  in  the  following  year.  He 
died  May  7,  1889,  at  which  time  the  Board  of  Trade  passed  appreci- 
ative resolutions  of  respect  and  admiration  for  him  as  a  citizen  and 
business  man.  He  and  his  wife  were  birthright  members  of  the 
Society  of  Friends  and  were  charter  members  of  its  first  organization 
in  Chicago.  Albert  Dickinson  acquired  his  rudimentary  education 
in  the  schools  of  his  native  State  and  was  a  lad  of  about  fourteen 
years  at  the  time  of  the  family  removal  to  Chicago.  Here  he  con- 
tinued his  studies  in  the  public  schools  until  1859,  when  he  was 
graduated  in  the  high  school,  as  a  member  of  the  first  class  to  be 
accorded  this  distinction  in  the  schools  of  Chicago.  Thereafter  he 
continued  to  be  associated  with  his  father's  business  operations 
until  he  responded  to  the  call  of  higher  duty  and  went  forth  as  a 
soldier  in  the  Civil  War.  Scarcely  had  died  away  the  sound  of  the 
thundering  of  rebel  guns  against  the  ramparts  of  old  Fort  Sumter 
when,  in  April,  1861,  Mr.  Dickinson,  then  nineteen  years  of  age, 
enlisted  in  Company  B  of  Taylor's  Battery  of  Chicago  Light  Artil- 
lery, which  was  soon  afterward  mustered  in  as  the  First  Regiment 
of  Illinois  Light  Artillery.  It  was  given  to  Mr.  Dickinson  to  live 
up  to  the  full  tension  of  the  great  conflict  between  the  North  and 
the  South,  to  take  part  in  many  sanguinary  engagements,  and  to 
make  a  record  that  shall  ever  reflect  honor  upon  his  name  and 
memory.  His  service  at  the  front  covered  a  period  of  three  years 
and  three  months,  within  which  he  participated  in  the  engagements 
at  Fredericktown,  Fort  Donelson,  Shiloh,  the  siege  of  Corinth, 
Chickasaw  Bayou,  Arkansas  Post,  and  Vicksburg,  after  which  his 


98  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

battery  was  sent  to  Memphis  with  Sherman's  forces,  moved  up  to 
Chattanooga  and  took  part  in  the  battle  of  Missionary  Ridge  and  in 
the  relief  of  General  Burnside  at  Knoxville.  Further  service  ren- 
dered by  Mr.  Dickinson  was  in  connection  with  the  historic  Atlanta 
campaign,  and  he  continued  with  his  battery  until  July,  1864,  when 
he  received  his  honorable  discharge.  It  may  well  be  noted  that  in 
later  years  Mr.  Dickinson  has  continued  to  show  a  lively  interest  in 
his  old  comrades  in  arms  and  has  signified  the  same  by  his  affiliation 
with  George  H.  Thomas  Post,  No.  5,  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic. 
After  the  termination  of  his  military  career  Mr.  Dickinson  became  a 
resident  of  Durant,  Cedar  County,  Iowa,  where  he  engaged  in  the 
buying  and  shipping  of  grain,  but  about  a  year  later  he  returned  to 
Chicago,  to  assume  virtual  charge  of  the  business  of  his  father, 
whose  health  had  become  much  impaired.  Thus  he  continued  his 
activities  until,  with  hundreds  of  others,  the  firm  met  with  financial 
disaster  through  the  great  Chicago  fire  of  1871.  Of  the  situation  and 
exigencies  thus  entailed  the  following  pertinent  account  has  been 
written :  "The  firm  found  itself  financially  involved  to  the  amount 
of  several  thousand  dollars,  mainly  represented  in  a  mortgage  that 
had  been  given  in  connection  with  the  construction  of  a  new  ware- 
house. Nothing  was  realized  from  the  insurance  that  had  been 
carried  on  the  property,  but  with  resolute  and  undaunted  purpose 
Albert  Dickinson,  with  the  effective  co-operation  of  his  brothers, 
Nathan  and  Charles,  the  latter  of  whom  was  then  but  fifteen  years 
of  age,  undertook  the  redemption  and  rebuilding  of  the  business. 
Following  their  removal  to  Kinzie  street  their  sister  Melissa  came 
into  the  business,  and  proved  a  valued  coadjutor  in  furthering  the 
desired  ends.  The  united  efforts  of  the  brothers  and  the  devoted 
sister  finally  triumphed  over  the  difficulties  and  obstacles  that  con- 
fronted them  in  this  climacteric  period  following  the  great  fire.  The 
brothers  met  all  liabilities  that  had  previously  been  incurred  by  their 
honored  father,  and  placed  the  business  once  more  on  a  paying  basis. 
From  that  time  forward  to  the  present  the  enterprise  has  grown 
steadily  in  scope  and  importance,  and  the  result  is  shown  in  the 
Albert  Dickinson  Company  having  conduct  and  control  of  one  of  the 
largest  seed  houses  in  the  world,  with  supply  resources  and  general 
facilities  that  are  unexcelled.  With  the  growth  of  the  business 
larger  quarters  were  demanded,  and  a  removal  was  made  from  No. 
136  to  No.  117  Kinzie  street,  the  adjoining  building,  at  No.  119, 
being  soon  afterward  secured.  A  few  years  later  quarters  were 
obtained  at  No.  113  Kinzie  Street,  as  well  as  Nos.  104  to  110  Michi- 
gan Street,  and  the  Empire  warehouse,  on  Market  Street,  between 
Van  Buren  and  Jackson  Streets,  also  was  added  to  the  storage  facili- 
ties. Still  later  expansion  of  business  was  indicated  by  the  abandon- 
ing of  all  previously  occupied  quarters  and  the  establishing  of  greatly 
increased  warehouse  facilities  at  Sixteenth  and  Clark  Streets.  After 
using  for  many  years  the  property  of  the  Chicago  Dock  Company 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  99 

for  storage  purposes,  the  Albert  Dickinson  Company,  in  1889,  ob- 
tained control  of  the  property  and  business  of  the  corporation  men- 
tioned and  built  at  Taylor  Street  and  the  river,  doing  business  there 
for  years.  The  extensive  ramifications  of  the  business  are  further 
indicated  by  the  maintenance  of  branch  houses  in  the  cities  of 
Boston,  Minneapolis,  New  York  and  Buffalo."  The  present  plant  of 
the  Albert  Dickinson  Company  is  conceded  to  be  the  largest,  most 
modern  and  most  thoroughly  equipped  of  all  institutions  of  the  kind 
in  the  world — in  fact  there  is  none  that  will  compare  with  it.  This 
monster  plant  was  completed  and  occupied  in  1915.  The  company 
purchased  a  tract  comprising  between  sixty  and  seventy  acres  at 
South  California  Avenue  and  West  Thirty-fifth  Street,  and  there 
erected  buildings  of  the  most  approved  and  modern  type  of  steel 
and  concrete  construction,  with  a  frontage  of  four  hundred  and 
twenty  feet  and  with  a  depth  of  equal  lineal  extension.  In  addition 
to  these  accommodations  the  company  has  nineteen  steel  storage 
tanks,  with  a  combined  capacity  for  the  accommodation  of  seven 
hundred  thousand  bushels.  The  plant  has  the  best  of  transportation 
facilities,  both  railroad  and  water,  and  an  idea  of  its  extent  and 
importance  is  conveyed  when  it  is  stated  that  the  erection  of  the 
plant  entailed  the  expenditure  of  one  and  one-half  millions  of  dollars. 
The  Dickinson  firm  continued  its  policy  of  conducting  a  general 
commission  business  until  1874,  when  the  present  cash  system  was 
adopted  and  the  limiting  of  operations  exclusively  to  the  handling 
of  seeds  was  initiated.  In  1888  the  business  was  incorporated 
under  the  present  title,  with  the  enlistment  of  eiTective  and  valued 
co-operation,  and  the  Albert  Dickinson  Company  now  bases  its 
operations  upon  a  capital  stock  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  thousand 
dollars,  with  an  unusually  large  surplus.  Albert  Dickinson  was 
President  of  the  company  from  the  time  of  its  incorporation  to 
within  the  last  few  years,  and  similar  conditions  obtain  also  with 
his  brothers,  Charles  and  Nathan,  who  are  still  respectively  Vice- 
President  and  Treasurer  of  the  company.  He  has  given  personal 
and  capitalistic  support  to  various  other  important  corporations  in 
Chicago,  and  aside  from  business  activities  has  stood  exponent  of 
the  most  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizenship,  the  while  he  has  been 
known  to  his  fellow  men  as  a  man  of  winning  personality — genial 
and  kindly,  generous  and  unassuming,  and  endowed  with  a  high 
sense  of  personal  stewardship  in  all  of  the  relations  of  life.  Nathan 
Dickinson,  who  has  been  Treasurer  of  the  Albert  Dickinson  Com- 
pany from  the  time  of  its  incorporation,  was  born  at  Curtisville, 
Massachusetts,  February  6,  1848,  and  thus  was  a  lad  of  about  six 
years  at  the  time  of  the  family  removal  to  Chicago,  where  he  was 
reared  to  manhood  and  where  he  received  the  advantages  of  the 
public  schools  of  the  period.  In  foregoing  paragraphs  it  has  been 
shown  that  he  early  became  associated  with  his  older  brother  in  the 
recouping  and  rebuilding  of  the  business  enterprise  that  had  been 


100  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

founded  by  their  father,  and  from  an  authoritative  source  is  drawn 
the  following  estimate  :  "For  half  a  century  Mr.  Dickinson  has  been 
identified  with  the  city's  commercial  and  financial  interests,  and  few 
have  been  more  active  in  the  promotion  of  progress  or  enjoy  a  higher 
standing.  Quiet  and  unassuming  in  his  tastes,  he  has  always  stood 
for  the  things  that  are  right  and  for  the  advance  of  the  standard 
of  citizenship.  Having  been  an  actor  in  the  vital  drama  that  trans- 
formed a  smoking  mass  of  ruins  into  a  metropolis  second  to  but  one 
other  city  in  the  country,  Mr.  Dickinson  is  an  authority  upon  all 
matters  relating  to  the  period  of  reconstruction  of  Chicago's  com- 
mercial and  industrial  interests.  That  he  bore  an  important  part  in 
this  work  his  own  record  proves,  but  his  knowledge  has  come  not 
only  from  his  personal  experiences,  but  also  gathered  from  that  of 
others,  so  that  it  is  of  indubitable  and  permanent  value  as  a  con- 
tribution to  the  history  of  the  great  western  metropolis."  At  Lake 
Geneva,  Wisconsin,  where  the  family  home  is  still  maintained, 
Nathan  Dickinson  wedded  Miss  Louise  H.  Boyd,  on  the  17th  of  July, 
1889,  and  they  have  two  children — Ruth  B.  and  Albert  B.  Charles 
Dickinson,  the  only  one  of  the  three  brothers  who  can  claim  Chi- 
cago nativity,  was  born  in  this  city  May  28,  1858,  and  he  likewise  is 
indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  Chicago  for  his  early  educational 
discipline.  As  stated  in  a  preceding  paragraph,  he  was  a  lad  of  but 
fifteen  years  at  the  time  when  he  became  actively  associated  with  the 
business  from  which  has  been  developed  the  stupendous  commercial 
enterprise  now  controlled  by  the  Albert  Dickinson  Company,  of 
which  he  is  Vice-President,  and  he  has  been  a  resourceful  and  pro- 
gressive factor  in  the  development  of  this  important  Chicago  enter- 
prise. For  many  years  he  was  a  Director  and  Vice-President  of 
the  Chicago  Dock  Company,  and  at  the  present  time  he  is  Vice- 
President  and  a  Director  of  the  Twin  City  Trading  Company,  of 
Minneapolis.  He  has  been  an  active,  successful  and  popular  member 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  since  he  was  seventeen 
years  of  age,  and  as  a  trader  he  has  won  a  specially  high  reputation. 
He  holds  membership  also  in  the  Chicago  Stock  Exchange,  the 
New  York  Produce  Exchange,  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce, the  Duluth  Board  of  Trade,  and  the  St.  Louis  Chamber  of 
Commerce.  Charles  Dickinson  is  essentially  a  man  of  vitality,  and 
counts  for  good  in  connection  with  both  civic  and  business  affairs. 
He  is  a  broad-gauged,  progressive  citizen  who  is  ever  ready  to  lend 
his  influence  and  co-operation  in  the  furtherance  of  measures  and 
undertakings  projected  for  the  general  good  of  the  community,  and 
his  popularity  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  representative 
social  organizations  in  both  Chicago  and  New  York  City.  He  and 
other  members  of  the  Dickinson  family  contributed  liberally  to  the 
organization  and  establishing  of  the  Iroquois  Emergency  Hospital, 
and  he  has  served  from  the  beginning  as  one  of  the  Trustees,  as  well 
as  a  Vice-President,  of  this  noble  memorial  institution  of  Chicago. 


TMc 


Ct-i^Pt 


U 


Cyi^C-C^^<Lo'-dA_^- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  101 

On  the  29th  of  September,  1897,  he  wedded  Mrs.  Marie  Isabelle 
Boyd,  whose  death  occurred  September  17,  1910,  no  children  having 
been  born  of  their  union. 

William  Dickinson. — For  nearly  forty  years  Mr.  Dickinson  was 
an  active  and  representative  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  and  he  left  on  this  great  commercial  organization 
and  upon  the  history  of  the  grain  trade  in  the  western  metropolis 
the  impress  of  a  strong,  upright  and  resourceful  character.  He 
retired  from  active  business  in  1898  and,  venerable  in  years,  he  still 
retains  his  residence  in  Chicago,  the  city  that  was  the  stage  of  the 
well-ordered  activities  that  enabled  him  to  achieve  a  large  measure 
of  success  and  secure  a  place  in  the  confidence  and  good  will  of 
those  with  whom  he  came  in  contact  in  the  varied  relations  of  life. 
Mr.  Dickinson  was  a  loyal  and  influential  member  of  the  Board  of 
Trade,  served  as  a  Director  and  Vice-President  of  the  same,  and 
in  view  of  the  fact  that  the  Board  is  now  putting  forth  decisive 
efiforts  for  the  erection  of  a  neVv  and  modern  building  for  its  head- 
quarters, it  is  especially  interesting  to  record  that  Mr.  Dickinson 
was  a  member  of  the  committee  appointed,  in  1883,  to  erect  the 
present  Board  of  Trade  Building.  William  Dickinson  comes  of 
the  staunchest  of  New  England  stock  and  is  a  scion  of  a  family  that 
was  founded  in  America  in  the  colonial  era,  the  family  name  having 
been  one  of  no  little  prominence  in  connection  with  the  civic  and  in- 
dustrial development  of  New  England,  that  gracious  cradle  of  much 
of  our  national  history.  Mr.  Dickinson  was  born  at  Hinsdale, 
Cheshire  County,  New  Hampshire,  on  the  31st  of  March,  1837,  and 
is  a  son  of  Erastus  and  Sophia  (Sargent)  Dickinson.  He  continued 
his  studies  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  village  until  he  was 
sixteen  years  of  age,  after  which  he  completed  a  two  years'  course  in 
a  well-conducted  academy  at  Springfield,  Vermont.  He  supple- 
mented this  discipline  by  attending  for  one  year,  1855-6,  historic  old 
Amherst  College,  at  Amherst,  Massachusetts,  in  which  he  de- 
voted his  time  to  technical  study.  Mr.  Dickinson  continued  his  resi- 
dence in  New  England  until  1856,  when,  at  the  age  of  nineteen 
years,  he  came  to  Chicago,  where,  in  1861,  he  entered  the  employ  of 
Hugh  McLennan,  who  was  here  engaged  in  the  grain  business,  as 
one  of  the  leading  pioneer  exponents  of  this  important  line  of 
industrial  and  commercial  enterprise.  In  1867  he  was  admitted  to 
partnership  in  the  well-ordered  business,  and  the  firm  of  Hugh 
McLennan  &  Co.  controlled  a  large  and  substantial  grain  exporting 
trade,  Mr.  Dickinson  continuing  a  member  of  the  firm  until  1886, 
after  which  he  conducted  a  prosperous  individual  grain  brokerage 
business  until  1898,  when,  amply  reinforced  by  the  rewards  of 
former  years  of  earnest  and  successful  endeavor,  he  retired  from  the 
field  of  commercial  enterprise  which  he  had  signally  dignified  and 
advanced  by  his  character  and  achievement.  Within  the  course  of 
his  active  business  life  Mr.  Dickinson  served  as  a  member  of  the 


102  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Directorate  of  the  Fifth  National  Bank  of  Chicago  and  as  Vice- 
President  and  a  Director  of  the  National  Bank  of  America  and  the 
American  National  Bank,  all  leading  financial  institutions  of  Chi- 
cago at  that  time.  He  further  amplified  his  capitalistic  and  com- 
mercial interests  by  becoming  a  Director  of  the  Chicago  Sugar 
Refining  Company  at  the  time  of  its  organization,  in  1883,  and  he 
continued  the  incumbent  of  this  office  until  1897,  besides  having 
been  for  a  time  Vice-President  of  the  company.  Later  he  was  a 
Director  and  the  Vice-President  of  the  Glucose  Sugar  Refining 
Company.  Even  the  brief  data  here  incorporated  clearly  indicate 
that  Mr.  Dickinson  played  a  large  and  important  part  in  the  fur- 
therance of  the  civic  and  commercial  development  and  progress  of 
Chicago,  and  though  he  has  now  attained  to  the  venerable  age  of 
eighty  years,  his  interest  in  and  loyalty  to  the  city  of  his  adoption 
continue  unflagging,  and  his  mental  and  physical  vitality  is  that  of 
the  average  man  many  years  his  junior.  It  is  specially  pleasing  to  be 
able  to  accord  Mr.  Dickinson  recognition  in  this  history  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  for  he  was  influential  in  its  government  and  opera- 
tions for  many  years  and  did  much  to  activate  and  give  enduring 
vitality  to  the  fine  code  of  commercial  ethics  for  which  it  has  ever 
stood  sponsor.  As  previously  stated,  he  served  as  a  Director  and 
as  Vice-President  of  the  Board  and  as  a  member  of  the  committee 
appointed  to  erect  the  present  building,  which  is  destined  within 
the  near  future  to  give  place  to  a  fine  modern  structure  on  the  same 
site.  With  well-fortified  opinions  concerning  governmental  and 
economic  questions,  Mr.  Dickinson  has  been  unwavering  in  his 
support  of  the  basic  principles  of  the  Republican  party,  his  religious 
faith  is  that  of  the  Congregational  church,  and  he  holds  membership 
in  the  University  Club  of  Chicago.  His  residence  has  long  been 
maintained  at  1544  North  State  street  and  he  has  an  attractive 
summmer  home  at  Fox  Lake,  Illinois.  In  the  city  of  Chicago, 
on  the  10th  of  November,  1874,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of 
Mr.  Dickinson  to  Miss  Eliza  Reynolds,  and  she  passed  to  the 
life  eternal  in  the  year  1899.  Of  their  children,  two  sons  are 
living — William  Reynolds  Dickinson  and  Francis  Reynolds 
Dickinson. 

William  H.  Dickinson. — He  whose  name  begins  this  review  has 
had  long  and  varied  experience  in  the  grain  trade,  with  which  he 
became  identified  when  he  was  a  youth  of  sixteen  years,  and  of 
which  he  has  become  a  prominent  and  successful  exponent  as  a 
progressive  commission  merchant  in  his  native  State,  his  offices  be- 
ing in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  Building  in  the  city  of  Minneap- 
olis, where  his  residence  is  at  2213  Aldrich  avenue.  South.  Mr. 
Dickinson  is  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  honored  pioneer  families 
of  Minnesota  and  was  there  born  about  a  decade  after  the  admission 
of  the  State  to  the  Union,  his  birth  having  occurred  on  the  4th  of 
September,  1868.     He  is  a  member  of  a  family  of  eight  children 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  103 

born  to  William  and  Margaret  (Thomas)  Dickinson,  and  his  father 
reclaimed  and  developed  one  of  the  excellent  farms  of  the  Gopher 
commonwealth  and  continued  to  be  identified  actively  with  farming 
until  the  time  of  his  death,  in  1886.  William  H.  Dickinson  was 
reared  to  the  sturdy  and  invigorating  discipline  of  the  pioneer  farm, 
made  good  use  of  the  advantages  afforded  by  the  public  schools, 
and  at  the  age  of  sixteen  years  he  became  concerned  with  the  grain 
business.  With  this  important  line  of  industrial  and  commercial 
enterprise  he  has  continued  his  alliance  during  the  interveningyears, 
he  is  a  resident  of  Minneapolis,  and  in  this  city  conducts  his  present 
independent  grain  commission  business.  He  is  one  of  the  active 
members  of  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade.  His  political  allegiance  is  given 
to  the  Republican  party,  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Masonic  fraternity, 
and  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Congregational  church. 
Mr.  Dickinson  was  married  to  Miss  Nellie  Edith  Watzke,  a  daugh- 
ter of  O.  A.  Watzke,  and  the  one  child  of  this  union  is  a  daughter, 
Donna  H. 

Leverett  Karl  Dvmcan.— On  the  14th  of  March,  1916,  Mr. 
Duncan  became  a  constituent  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  in  which  great  commercial  organization  he  is  rep- 
resentative of  L.  E.  Duncan  &  Co.,  of  Decatur,  Macon  county, 
Illinois.  Of  this  important  concern,  which  controls  a  substantial 
brokerage  business  in  the  handling  of  grain,  Mr.  Duncan  is  the 
executive  head,  and  he  is  known  as  one  of  the  progressive  and  ener- 
getic young  men  now  actively  connected  with  the  Board  of  Trade, 
so  that  he  is  clearly  entitled  to  recognition  in  this  publication.  Mr. 
Duncan  was  born  at  Cowden,  Illinois,  on  the  10th  of  December, 
1886,  and  is  a  son  of  Zachariah  T.  and  Laura  (Cochman)  Duncan. 
In  the  public  schools  of  his  native  county  he  continued  his  studies 
until  his  graduation  in  the  high  school,  as  a  member  of  the  class 
of  1905,  and  soon  afterward  he  went  to  the  city  of  St.  Louis,  Mis- 
souri, where  he  remained  for  a  brief  interval.  In  1908  he  became 
associated  with  the  grain  and  elevator  firm  of  Ware  &  Leland,  at 
Decatur,  and  the  line  of  enterprise  with  which  he  thus  identified 
himself  proved  much  to  his  liking,  with  the  result  that  he  has  ap- 
plied himself  with  marked  discernment  and  energy  and  has  become 
an  influential  exponent  of  the  grain  trade  in  the  southern  part  of  his 
native  State.  After  severing  his  connection  with  the  firm  men- 
tioned he  was  associated  in  Decatur  with  F.  P.  Smith  &  Co.  until 
March  15,  1916,  when  he  established  himself  independently  in  the 
same  line  of  business,  operating  as  L.  E.  Duncan  &  Co.  In  politics 
Mr.  Duncan  gives  his  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  and  he  and 
his  wife  are  members  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  in  their 
home  city.  In  1912  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Duncan 
to  Miss  May  Auer,  a  daughter  of  James  G.  Auer,  of  Decatur,  Illi- 
nois, and  they  have  one  daughter — Marie  M. 


104  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Leo  J.  Dwyer. — In  tracing  the  careers  of  prominent  men  of 
Chicago,  it  is  easy  to  see  that  progressive  characters  have  never 
lacked  for  opportunity,  and  that  opportunity  has  not  signified  so 
much  as  the  man.  In  this  country,  where. the  valuable  prizes  of 
life  depend  upon  merit,  rather  than  upon  the  accident  of  birth  and 
fortune,  the  men  of  pluck  and  ambition  are  the  successful.  The 
highest  places  in  the  learned  profession  are  filled  with,  and  the 
greatest  commercial  enterprises  are  conducted  by,  such  men ;  men 
who,  at  the  outset  of  life,  placed  a  just  valuation  upon  honor,  in- 
tegrity and  determination.  These  are  the  traits  of  character  that 
insure  the  highest  emoluments  and  greatest  reward,  and  to  these 
may  we  attribute  the  success  that  has  crowned  the  eflforts  of  Leo  J. 
Dwyer,  dealer  in  real  estate  investments  and  securities.  Mr.  Dwyer 
was  born  in  Chicago,  August  13,  1864,  a  son  of  Leo  P.  and  Margaret 
(Kiley)  Dwyer,  natives  of  Ireland  and  pioneers  of  Chicago,  to 
which  city  they  came  with  their  parents  when  young.  Leo  P. 
Dwyer  was  a  contractor  by  occupation,  and  for  many  years  was 
one  of  the  prominent,  active  business  men  of  this  city.  He  served  in 
the  State  legislature,  where  his  moral  and  upright  character  won 
for  him  the  title  of  "Honest  Leo  P.  Dwyer."  He  was  unfaltering 
in  his  opposition  to  a  course  which  he  deemed  inimical  to  the 
best  interests  of  the  country  and  people,  and  no  citizen  of  Chicago 
was  more  respected  or  enjoyed  the  confidence  of  the  people  or  more 
richly  deserved  the  regard  in  which  he  was  held.  In  his  home,  in 
social  and  business  circles,  he  was  ever  kind  and  courteous,  and 
his  death,  which  occurred  July  10,  1894,  removed  from  this  city  one 
of  its  most  worthy  citizens.  Leo  J.  Dwyer  obtained  his  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  Chicago,  and  also  took  a  course  in  the  night 
school  of  the  Chicago  College  of  Law.  He  early  developed  an 
aptitude  for  business,  and  in  1876,  at  the  age  of  twelve,  he  secured 
a  position  as  messenger  boy  in  the  insurance  office  of  William  E. 
Rollo  &  Son,  of  this  city.  After  about  four  years  with  this  house 
he  accepted  a  clerical  position  with  the  Central  States  Dispatch 
Fast  Freight  Lines,  and  remained  with  that  corporation  nearly  a 
quarter  of  a  century.  In  1891  he  was  promoted  to  commercial 
freight  agent  for  the  city  of  Chicago  and  the  southwestern  and 
northwestern  territory,  filling  that  position  until  March  1,  1914, 
when  he  resigned  to  establish  himself  in  his  present  business,  at 
7710  Sheridan  Road.  When  Mr.  Dwyer  settled  in  this  neighbor- 
hood, in  1911,  the  entire  surrounding  country  was  almost  a  wilder- 
ness, having  no  improvements  of  any  kind,  such  as  paved  streets, 
sewage,  gas  or  electric  lights.  It  was  then,  and  for  some  years  after- 
ward, known  as  "No  Man's  Land."  He  has  been  instrumental  in 
bringing  great  improvements  about,  and  deserves  much  credit  for 
the  active  interest  he  has  taken  along  these  lines.  There  is  perhaps 
no  man  in  Chicago  who  has  a  wider  circle  of  acquaintances  among 
the  influential  citizens  of  the  city,  and  few  who  have  been  so  active 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  105 

in  the  development  of  the  North  Side.  His  entire  career  has  been 
characterized  by  high  standards  of  business  ethics,  and  his  record 
stands  without  a  blemish.  In  1885  Mr.  Dwyer  was  united  in  mar- 
riage with  Miss  Margaret  Olympia  Behan,  of  Chicago,  a  daughter 
of  Patrick  and  Alice  (McCabe)  Behan,  and  they  became  the  parents 
of  four  children — Alice  V.  (deceased),  Edward  J.  (deceased),  Leo 
P.,  who  is  engaged  in  the  circular-letter  business  in  Chicago,  and 
Vincent  J.,  who  is  associated  with  his  father  in  the  real  estate 
business.  Mr.  Dwyer  became  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade  December  14,  1891,  and  has  since  maintained  an  active  mem- 
bership in  this  organization.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Chicago 
Athletic  Association  and  is  identified  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus, 
Catholic  Order  of  Foresters  and  the  Board  of  Underwriters.  He  is 
a  member  of  the  Cook  County  Real  Estate  Board  and  is  the  founder 
and  secretary  of  the  North  Birchwood  Improvement  Association. 
George  W.  Eberhardt. — One  of  the  most  important  of  the  brok- 
erage concerns  engaged  in  the  handling  of  stocks,  bonds,  grain  and 
provisions  in  the  city  of  Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania,  is  that  of  George 
W.  Eberhardt  &  Co.,  and  he  whose  name  gives  title  to  the  firm  and 
who  is  its  executive  head,  has  represented  it  as  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  since  1909.  He  became  an 
active  member  of  the  Pittsburgh  Stock  Exchange  in  1901,  and  of 
the  New  York  Stock  Exchange  in  1915.  Mr.  Eberhardt  has  proved 
himself  one  of  the  vigorous  business  men  and  popular  citizens  of 
Pittsburgh,  and  his  achievement  has  been  such  as  to  make  him  a 
man  whose  alliance  with  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  is  valued,  his 
status  as  one  of  its  non-resident  members  making  him  specially 
eligible  for  recognition  in  this  history  of  the  great  commercial 
organization.  George  Washington  Eberhardt  was  born  in  Pitts- 
burgh, on  the  13th  of  August,  1875,  and  is  a  son  of  the  late  William 
Eberhardt,  who  was  long  numbered  among  the  honored  and  in- 
fluential citizens  of  that  city,  where  for  many  years  he  conducted  an 
extensive  brewing  and  malting  enterprise,  his  death  having  occurred 
March  25,  1899.  He  whose  name  introduces  this  article  is  indebted 
to  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  for  his  early  educational  dis- 
cipline, and,  after  completing  a  course  in  a  local  business  college, 
he  continued  as  his  father's  assistant  in  the  brewing  and  malting 
business  until  1890.  In  June,  1899,  he  engaged  in  the  brokerage 
business,  and  as  the  organizer  and  head  of  the  firm  of  George  W. 
Eberhardt  &  Co.  he  has  effectively  dictated  the  policies  that  have 
brought  to  the  firm  the  secure  prestige  as  one  of  the  leading  con- 
cerns of  the  kind  in  Pittsburgh.  A  large  volume  of  business  is 
transacted  each  year  by  the  firm,  and  the  enterprise  shows  a  con- 
stantly cumulative  tendency,  owing  to  the  steadfast  and  duly  con- 
servative methods  brought  to  bear  in  insuring  its  stability  and  jus- 
tifying its  place  in  popular  confidence.  In  the  Masonic  fraternity 
Mr.  Eberhardt  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish 


106  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Rite,  with  his  maximum  York  Rite  degree  with  the  Knights  Tem- 
plar, and  he  is  identified  also  with  the  Mystic  Shrine  and  with  the 
Benevolent  &  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  His  political  allegiance  is 
given  to  the  Republican  party  and  he  and  his  wife  are  communi- 
cants of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church.  The  family  home  in 
Pittsburgh  is  at  1138  North  Negley  avenue.  Mr.  Eberhardt  was 
married  to  Miss  Mary  A.  Whitman,  daughter  of  Hugh  Whitman, 
of  Pittsburgh,  and  three  children  have  been  born  to  this  union. 

Colonel  Bernard  A.  Eckhart. — Incidental  to  the  fearful  activi- 
ties of  the  present  European  war,  the  Province  of  Alsace,  Germany, 
again  figures  as  the  subject  of  great  polemic  activities,  and  it  was  in 
this  beautiful  province,  which  was  then  a  part  of  French  domain, 
that  Bernard  Albert  Eckhart  was  born  in  the  year  1852,  though  he 
was  but  an  infant  at  the  time  when  his  parents,  Jacob  and  Eva 
(Root)  Eckhart,  immigrated  to  the  United  States  and  became 
pioneer  settlers  in  the  State  of  Wisconsin.  Little  could  the  earnest 
and  worthy  parents  have  imagined  that  in  the  land  of  their  adop- 
tion their  then  infant  son  was  destined  to  achieve  large  and  well- 
merited  success  and  to  become  a  powerful  force  in  connection  with 
the  civic  and  commercial  affairs  of  a  great  metropolis.  Such  was 
the  reward  that  Fate  had  in  store  for  Bernard  A.  Eckhart,  but  none 
can  doubt  that  the  result  has  been  achieved  through  his  dominating 
powers  as  a  man  of  superior  initiative  and  executive  ability  and  by 
his  circumspection  and  resolute  purpose  in  availing  himself  of  the 
opportunities  which  have  been  presented.  Mr.  Eckhart  has  long 
been  an  influential  factor  in  the  industrial,  commercial  and  civic 
life  of  the  city  of  Chicago,  where  he  was  instrumental  in  the  up- 
building of  one  of  the  leading  flour-milling  enterprises  of  the  coun- 
try, and  where  he  is  a  stockholder  and  Director  in  representative 
financial  institutions,  and  where  his  great  civic  loyalty  and  public 
spirit  have  brought  to  him  distinguished  official  preferments  and 
given  him  large  and  benignant  influence  in  connection  with  public 
affairs.  He  stands  forth  as  one  of  the  emphatically  representative 
men  of  the  great  metropolis  of  the  West,  has  been  a  loyal  member 
of  the  Board  of  Trade,  was  a  member  of  the  Directorate  of  this  im- 
portant commercial  organization  from  1888  to  1891,  and  in  every 
sense  is  he  entitled  to  specific  recognition  and  definite  tribute  in  this 
publication.  Mr.  Eckhart  gained  his  early  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  Wisconsin  and  in  1868  was  graduated  from  a  well- 
ordered  college  in  the  city  of  Milwaukee.  From  1870  to  1874  he 
was  the  Chicago  representative  of  the  Eagle  Milling  Company,  of 
Milwaukee,  and  he  then  became  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Chi- 
cago milling  firm  of  Eckhart  &  Swan,  and  when  the  same  was  later 
reorganized  as  the  Eckhart  &  Swan  Milling  Company  he  became 
President  of  the  corporation,  an  office  of  which  he  continued  the 
incumbent  after  the  present  title  of  the  B.  A.  Eckhart  Milling  Com- 
pany was  adopted.    His  progressive  and  resourceful  administration 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  107 

brought  this  concern  into  foremost  place  in  its  field  of  enterprise, 
and  through  his  association  with  the  same  he  laid  the  foundation 
for  his  substantial  fortune.  Mr.  Eckhart  is  still  President  of  the 
company,  and  his  status  in  the  commercial  world  is  further  indi- 
cated by  the  fact  that  he  is  a  Director  of  each  of  the  great  financial 
institutions  here  designated:  The  Continental  &  Commercial 
National  Bank,  the  Continental  &  Commercial  Trust  &  Savings 
Bank,  the  Harris  Trust  &  Savings  Bank,  the  Chicago  Title  &  Trust 
Company,  and  the  Northwestern  Trust  &  Savings  Bank.  In  the 
domain  of  public  afTairs  and  service  Mr.  Eckhart  has  made  a  record 
which  reflects  great  honor  upon  his  name,  even  as  his  reputation  in 
business  and  in  private  life  has  ever  been  inviolable.  He  has  been 
a  stalwart  and  effective  advocate  and  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the 
Republican  party  and  has  been  influential  in  its  councils  in  the 
State  of  his  adoption.  During  the  thirty-fifth  and  thirty-sixth 
general  assemblies  of  the  Illinois  legislature,  1887-9,  he  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  State  Senate,  in  which  he  served  with  characteristic 
loyalty  and  ability.  He  was  instrumental  in  having  enacted  in 
laws  many  useful  and  progressive  measures  while  he  represented 
the  First  Senatorial  District  of  Illinois  in  the  Senate — among 
others,  the  statute  creating  the  Sanitary  District  of  Chicago.  From 
1891  to  1900  he  was  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Sani- 
tary District  of  Chicago,  of  which  he  was  President  from  December, 
1895,  to  December,  1896.  Preparatory  to  opening  the  canal  in  1900 
when  the  main  channel  was  completed,  he  secured  a  permit  from  the 
United  States  Government  through  General  Russell  A.  Alger,  who 
was  then  Secretary  of  War,  to  draw  the  waters  from  Lake  Michigan 
into  the  canal.  From  July,  1905,  to  February,  1908,  he  was  Presi- 
dent of  the  Board  of  West  Chicago  Park  Commissioners,  and  dur- 
ing that  period  of  time  reconstructed  the  entire  West  Park  System 
and  created  the  first  small  parks  and  playgrounds  on  the  West 
Side.  In  1905  he  was  a  delegate  to  the  Chicago  charter  convention, 
in  which  he  served  as  chairman  of  the  committee  on  rules,  pro- 
cedure and  general  plans.  In  1907  he  was  appointed  a  member  of 
the  Railroad  and  Warehouse  Commission  and  served  until  1913. 
He  was  largely  responsible  for  the  abolition  of  grade  crossings  be- 
tween steam  railroads  and  electric  roads  in  the  State  of  Illinois.  It 
is  worthy  of  special  note  that  Mr.  Eckhart  was  prominently  identi- 
fied with  the  organization  of  Chicago's  celebrated  military  body 
that  made  a  gallant  record  in  the  Spanish-American  war — the  First 
Infantry  Regiment  of  the  Illinois  National  Guard,  in  which  he 
served  as  an  officer  for  several  years.  In  1906  he  augmented  his 
military  distinction  by  becoming  an  aide-de-camp  on  the  stafT  of 
Governor  Deneen,  during  whose  administration  he  served  in  this 
capacity,  with  the  rank  of  colonel.  Mr.  Eckhart  was  the  first  Presi- 
dent of  the  Millers'  National  Federation,  of  which  position  he  was 
incumbent  from  1902  to  1904.     In  1903  he  was  President  of  the 


108  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Illinois  Manufacturers'  Association ;  in  1908  he  was  Vice-President 
of  the  National  Council  of  Commerce ;  and  in  1910  he  was  a  delegate 
to  the  International  Congress  on  Commercial  Education,  in  the  city 
of  Vienna,  Austria.  He  was  a  member  of  the  executive  committee 
created  to  prepare  the  bill  for  presentation  in  the  Illinois  legislature 
to  effect  the  establishing  of  the  Municipal  Court  of  Chicago.  He  is 
one  of  the  trustees  of  Lewis  Institute,  one  of  the  noble  and  practical 
educational  institutions  of  Chicago.  His  appreciation  of  the 
amenities  of  social  life  are  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  fol- 
lowing named  and  representative  Chicago  organizations :  The 
Chicago  Club,  the  Union  League  Club,  the  Commercial  Club,  the 
Onwentsia  and  Old  Elm  Club.  Within  the  restricted  confines  of 
a  sketch  of  this  necessarily  limited  province  it  is  impossible  to 
give  details  concerning  the  long  and  splendid  career  of  Mr.  Eckhart, 
but  the  mere  statement  of  facts  that  have  been  given  carry  in 
their  train  due  significance,  with  the  lessons  of  incentive  and 
inspiration.  On  the  25th  of  December,  1874,  was  solemnized  the 
marriage  of  Mr.  Eckhart  to  Miss  Katie  L.  Johnson,  of  Cincinnati, 
Ohio,  and  they  have  four  children,  namely:  Carlos  K.  Eckhart, 
Percy  B.  Eckhart,  Hazel  Eckhart  (now  Mrs.  Truman  W.  Brophy, 
Jr.),  and  Dorothy  Eckhart  (now  Mrs.  E.  Reginald  Williams). 

William  N,  Eckhardt. — As  President  of  the  Pope  &  Eckhardt 
Company,  representative  commission  merchants  in  the  grain  and 
seed  trade,  Mr.  Eckhardt  has  secure  vantage-ground  as  one  of  the 
prominent  exponents  of  this  important  line  of  enterprise  in  his 
native  city,  and  his  influential  association  with  Chicago  is  the  more 
interesting  by  reason  of  the  fact  that  he  may  legitimately  be  desig- 
nated as  a  scion  of  one  of  the  sterling  pioneer  families  of  the  great 
western  metropolis,  where  his  parents,  Louis  and  Katharina 
(Minke)  Eckhardt,  established  their  home  more  than  half  a  cen- 
tury ago  and  where  they  passed  the  residue  of  their  lives,  both 
having  been  zealous  communicants  of  the  Evangelical  Lutheran 
church.  Louis  Eckhardt  was  one  of  the  original  trustees  of  St. 
Peter's  church,  then  located  at  Noble  Street  and  Chicago  Avenue, 
now  at  Cortez  and  Oakley  Boulevard.  In  the  early  days  he  fol- 
lowed the  carpenter's  trade  and  later  was  engaged  in  the  retail 
grocery  business.  William  Nickolas  Eckhardt  was  born  in  Chicago 
on  the  20th  of  July,  1859,  and  his  early  educational  advantages  were 
those  afforded  in  the  local  parochial  schools  of  the  Evangelical 
Lutheran  church  and  in  the  public  schools  of  Chicago,  in  which  he 
completed  the  curriculum  of  what  was  then  designated  as  the 
grammar  school.  As  a  youth  he  initiated  his  business  career  as 
a  minor  clerk  in  a  dry  goods  store  conducted  by  W.  C.  Poleman, 
but  later  he  obtained  a  position  as  messenger  in  a  branch  of  the 
Union  Trust  Company  on  Milwaukee  Avenue.  In  February,  1874, 
Mr.  Eckhardt  began  his  association  with  the  important  line  of 
enterprise  of  which  he  is  now  a  prominent  and  influential  repre- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  109 

sentative.  He  assumed  a  clerical  position  in  the  oifices  of  the  firm 
of  Pope  &  Davis,  which  was  the  predecessor  of  the  Pope  &  Eck- 
hardt  Company,  of  which  he  is  now  the  executive  head.  His 
advancement  in  the  commission  business  has  been  won  by  close 
application,  fidelity  to  trust  and  distinctive  initiative  and  executive 
ability.  It  is  much  to  have  gained  place  at  the  head  of  a  concern 
controlling  a  most  substantial  and  prosperous  business  in  the  grain 
and  seed  commission  trade,  and  the  company  of  which  Mr.  Eck- 
hardt  is  President  has  expanded  its  operations  to  wide  scope,  the 
while  special  attention  is  given  to  handling  of  commodities  drawn 
from  the  great  producing  sections  of  the  West.  Mr.  Eckhardt  has 
been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  August,  1880,  and  in 
this  connection  his  activities  have  been  guided  and  governed  by 
the  same  resolute  purpose,  steadfastness  and  progressiveness  that 
have  characterized  his  private  business  career  and  that  have  given 
him  a  reputation  that  is  in  itself  a  valuable  commercial  asset.  In 
1896  he  was  elected  a  Director  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  he  served 
during  the  years  1896,  1897  and  1898.  In  1900  he  was  elected  Vice- 
President,  his  service  continuing  during  1900  and  1901.  Since  1894 
Mr.  Eckhardt  has  served  continuously  on  one  or  more  committees 
or  as  an  official  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  has  generously  and 
willingly  devoted  much  of  his  time  and  effort  to  the  interest  and 
welfare  of  this  institution.  The  offices  of  the  Pope  &  Eckhardt 
Company  are  at  111  West  Jackson  Boulevard.  Mr.  Eckhardt  has 
been  an  appreciative  student  of  the  history  and  teachings  of  the 
time-honored  Masonic  fraternity,  and  is  prominently  affiliated  with 
the  same.  His  ancient  craft  affiliation  is  with  Kilwinning  Lodge, 
No.  311,  Ancient  Free  &  Accepted  Masons,  of  which  he  served  as 
master  in  1901.  He  is  likewise  actively  identified  with  Corinthian 
Chapter,  No.  69,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  Chicago  Council,  No.  4, 
Royal  &  Select  Masters ;  St.  Bernard  Commandery,  No.  35,  Knights 
Templar ;  Oriental  Consistory  of  the  Valley  of  Chicago,  Ancient 
Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  and  Medinah  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic 
Order  of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  His  prominence  and 
popularity  in  the  fraternity  is  further  indicated  by  the  fact  that 
since  December,  1909,  he  has  held  the  office  of  treasurer  of  the 
Central  Masonic  Temple  of  Chicago.  On  the  5th  of  April,  1898, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Eckhardt  to  Mrs.  Amalie 
Nabroth  (nee  Sittig),  and  they  have  two  daughters:  Laura  Alice, 
who  is  the  wife  of  George  C.  Farnum,  and  Lulu,  who  is  the  wife 
of  Charles  E.  Scarritt. 

George  W.  Eddy. — Associated  with  his  brother,  C.  F.  Eddy,  in 
the  control  of  a  grain  exporting  trade  of  large  volume  and  under 
the  corporate  title  of  C.  F.  &  G.  W.  Eddy,  he  whose  name  begins 
this  paragraph  is  consistently  to  be  noted  as  one  of  the  prominent 
representatives  of  the  grain  trade  in  the  city  of  Boston,  where  he 
and  his  brother  are  proving  most  able  successors  of  their  father 


no         HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

in  this  important  field  of  commercial  enterprise,  the  father,  the  late 
Caleb  Francis  Eddy,  having  long  been  known  as  one  of  the  most 
active  and  influential  figures  in  the  grain  commission  and  export- 
ing business  in  the  Massachusetts  metropolis,  and  having  continued 
his  connection  with  the  business  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in 
1912.  George  W.  Eddy  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  and  as  one  of  its  non-resident  representatives  he 
is  consistently  accorded  recognition  in  this  volume.  In  a  family 
of  twelve  children,  George  W.  Eddy  was  born  at  Falls  River, 
Massachusetts,  on  the  12th  of  May,  1862,  a  son  of  Caleb  Francis 
Eddy  and  Georgiana  (Winslow)  Eddy,  both  representatives  of  fine 
old  colonial  families  of  New  England.  In  the  agnatic  line  Mr.  Eddy 
is  a  descendant  of  Samuel  Eddy,  who  came  from  England  and  set- 
tled in  Middleboro,  Massachusetts,  in  1630.  In  the  public  schools 
George  W.  Eddy  continued  his  studies  until  he  had  completed  the 
curriculum  of  the  Newton  high  school,  in  which  he  was  graduated 
as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1880.  In  1883  he  became  identified 
with  the  grain  business  in  Boston,  where  he  has  continued  his 
activities  during  the  long  intervening  period  of  nearly  two  score 
years,  and  where  he  has  achieved  success,  as  indicated  in  the  scope 
and  importance  of  the  business  controlled  by  the  incorporated  firm 
of  which  he  is  a  member,  as  previously  noted.  The  office  of  the 
firm  is  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  building,  and  in  addition  to 
representation  in  the  Boston  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Chi- 
cago Board  of  Trade  it  has  similar  alliance  with  the  New  York 
Produce  Exchange  and  the  Winnipeg  Grain  Exchange,  in  the  cap- 
ital city  of  Manitoba,  Canada.  Mr.  Eddy  has  been  concerned  with 
large  operations  in  the  handling  of  hay  as  well  as  grain,  and  the 
present  firm  of  C.  F.  &  G.  W.  Eddy  dates  its  inception  from  the 
year  1895.  In  politics  Mr.  Eddy  is  found  loyally  aligned  in  the 
ranks  of  the  Republican  party,  he  is  a  member  of  the  Boston  Golf 
Club  and  the  Brae-Burn  Club,  and  his  attractive  home  is  at  85 
Bigelow  Road,  West  Newton.  On  the  11th  of  December,  1894, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Eddy  to  Miss  Bertha  M.  Clark, 
daughter  of  Joseph  Clark,  ot  Northampton,  Massachusetts,  and 
the  two  children  of  this  union  are  Priscilla  C.  and  Elizabeth. 

James  Augustus  Edwards. — In  preparing  a  review  of  the  lives 
of  men  whose  careers  have  been  honorably  blended  with  the  history 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  no  name  is  more 
worthy  of  mention  than  that  of  the  late  James  A.  Edwards,  for 
many  years  a  successful  business  man  of  this  city  and  an  active 
member  of  the  organization.  His  labors  not  only  constituted  a 
potent  factor  in  the  progress  and  development  of  the  city,  but  were 
an  inspiring  influence,  and  even  though  he  has  passed  from  the 
scene  of  earthly  activities  his  work  remains  as  a  force  for  good  in 
the  community.  He  not  only  achieved  notable  success  in  business, 
but  in  his  home,  in  social  and  public  life,  he  was  kind  and  cour- 


-i^^A 


^t-':^,^cy  ,i^^-f 


/^' 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  111 

teous,  and  no  citizen  of  Chicago  was  more  respected  or  enjoyed 
the  confidence  of  the  people  or  more  richly  deserved  the  regard  in 
which  he  was  held.  Mr.  Edwards  was  born  in  Baltimore,  Mary- 
land, November  11,  1854,  a  son  of  Dr.  Edward  W.  and  Catherine 
R.  (DiflfenderfTer)  Edwards,  who  were  pioneers  of  Chicago,  having 
removed  to  this  city  from  Baltimore  when  our  subject  was  six  years 
of  age.  The  father  was  a  physician  and  surgeon,  and  was  one  of 
the  learned  men  of  his  profession  who  gave  impetus  to  the  work 
of  science  in  this  city.  After  acquiring  a  substantial  education  in 
the  public  and  private  schools  of  Chicago,  James  A.  Edwards  began 
his  business  career  when  sixteen  years  of  age  with  the  old  estab- 
lished Board  of  Trade  firm  of  Culver  &  Co.  He  remained  with 
that  house  until  the  close  of  the  year  1872,  and  in  the  following 
year  entered  the  employ  of  Dennis  &  Ingham,  who  were  in  the 
same  line,  and  continued  with  the  latter  firm  until  1874.  In  May, 
1875,  he  embarked  in  business  for  himself,  becoming  an  exponent  of 
the  grain  commission  trade,  of  which  he  became  one  of  the  promi- 
nent and  influential  representatives.  To  meet  the  demands  of  the 
constantly  expanding  trade,  and  as  a  matter  of  commercial  expe- 
diency, the  business  was  incorporated  in  1898,  and  was  also  reor- 
ganized in  1912,  although  Mr.  Edwards  remained  the  executive 
head  until  his  retirement  from  business  activities  in  April,  1916. 
He  was  a  loyal  and  most  valued  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
during  his  entire  identification  with  the  organization,  and  was  one 
of  those  upright  and  sagacious  men  who  have  aided  in  furthering 
the  prosperity  and  prestige  of  this  great  institution.  He  joined  the 
Board  May  21,  1877,  and  was  one  of  its  active  members  until  April 
19,  1916,  when  he  transferred  his  membership  to  his  son  Donald 
Edwards.  Coming  to  this  city  when  a  small  boy  and  entering 
business  life  when  a  lad  of  sixteen,  Mr.  Edwards  grew  up  with 
Chicago  during  the  period  of  its  most  marvelous  development,  and 
through  pluck,  perseverance  and  honorable  dealing  he  became  one 
of  its  substantial  and  most  valued  citizens.  A  man  of  unusual 
public  spirit,  interested  in  local  affairs  and  proud  of  the  city  in 
which  much  of  his  activities  and  mature  manhood  were  passed, 
he  was  a  powerful  factor  in  the  furtherance  of  any  measure  which 
had  for  its  aim  the  advancement  of  the  people  or  the  betterment 
of  existing  conditions.  To  sketch  in  detail  his  work  during  his 
active  business  life  would  be  a  task  of  no  small  moment,  however 
agreeable  and  interesting.  It  must  suffice  to  say  in  conclusion  that 
his  labors  were  of  the  most  earnest  character,  that  they  were 
exceedingly  comprehensive,  and  that  they  contributed  in  a  most 
important  degree  to  the  development  of  the  agricultural  and  com- 
mercial prosperity  and  wealth  of  the  section  in  which  they  were 
performed,  and  in  no  slight  measure  to  the  material  advantage  of 
the  whole  country.  Although  making  no  claim  to  greater  credit 
than  that  which  belonged  to  one,  who  by  wise  and  persistent  effort, 


112  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

advanced  his  own  fortune  and  at  the  same  time  that  of  hundreds, 
even  thousands,  who  shared  in  one  way  or  another  in  his  enter- 
prises, a  discriminating  pubHc  sentiment  will  not  fail  to  accord 
him  a  front  rank  among  the  commercial  benefactors  of  the  country. 
On  April  12,  1882,  Mr.  Edwards  was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss 
Minnie  E.  Paine,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Joseph  E.  Pame,  of  Brook- 
lyn, New  York,  and  a  woman  of  exceptional  mental  capacity  and 
much  beauty  of  character.  They  became  the  parents  of  two  sons 
and  two  daughters ;  the  sons,  Kenneth  P.  and  Donald  Edwards, 
are  both  active  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  are  classed 
with  the  enterprising  and  conservative  commission  merchants  of 
the  city.  The  former  joined  the  Board  December  23,  1908,  and  the 
latter  became  a  member  by  transfer  of  his  father's  membership  on 
April  19,  1916,  and  both  are  associated  with  the  firm  of  J.  A. 
Edwards  &  Co.  The  daughters  are  Marjorie  Edwards,  who  resides 
with  her  mother,  and  Dorothy,  who  became  the  wife  of  Frederick 
A.  Rogers,  of  Indianapolis,  Indiana.  The  family  home  has  been  in 
Hyde  Park  for  many  years.  It  is  a  hospitable  one,  where  good 
cheer  abounds,  and  where  the  family's  numerous  friends  are  ever 
welcome.  Although  unostentatious  in  manner,  Mr.  Edwards  was 
recognized  as  a  man  of  earnest  purpose  and  progressive  principles. 
He  always  stood  for  the  things  that  were  right,  and  for  the  advance- 
ment of  citizenship,  and  was  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to 
modern  improvements  along  material,  intellectual  and  moral  lines. 
Though  he  had  many  warm  friends  and  was  prominent  in  social 
circles,  he  was  devoted  to  the  pleasures  of  home  life,  and  his  hap- 
piest moments  were  always  spent  at  his  own  fireside.  He  found 
pleasure  in  promoting  the  welfare  of  his  wife  and  children,  and  was 
a  kind  husband  and  an  indulgent  father.  He  was  identified  with 
various  social  organizations  of  representative  order,  including  the 
Chicago  Athletic  Association,  the  Forty  Club  and  the  Midlothian 
and  South  Shore  Country  Clubs.  In  the  Masonic  fraternity  he  had 
completed  the  circle  of  both  the  York  and  Scottish  Rites,  besides 
having  been  affiliated  with  the  adjunct  organization,  Medina  Temple 
of  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine. 
His  ancient  craft  affiliation  was  with  Ashland  Lodge,  No.  308, 
Free  &  Accepted  Masons.  Although  he  was  a  stalwart  Republican 
in  his  political  affiliations  he  took  no  part  in  politics  aside  from 
casting  the  weight  of  his  influence  in  support  of  men  and  measure? 
working  for  the  public  good,  and  at  no  time  was  animated  with  a 
desire  for  public  office.  In  business  life  he  was  alert,  sagacious  and 
reliable;  as  a  citizen  he  was  honorable,  prom.pt  and  true  to  every 
engagement,  and  his  death,  which  occurred  January  15,  1917, 
removed  from  Chicago  one  of  its  most  valued  citizens. 

Sherman  T.  Edwards. — Somewhat  more  than  a  year  prior  to 
attaining  his  legal  majority  Sherman  Thayer  Edwards  became  asso- 
ciated with  his  honored  father  in  the  grain  commission  business  in 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  113 

Chicago,  and  his  activities  in  this  important  field  of  commercial 
enterprise  have  now  covered  a  period  of  more  than  thirty  years, 
during  which  he  has  maintained  a  reputation  that  in  itself  con- 
stitutes a  most  significant  and  valuable  commercial  asset.  As 
President  of  the  Edwards  &  Loomis  Company,  Mr.  Edwards  was  in 
control  of  a  specially  large  and  substantial  commission  business 
in  grain,  hay  and  feed,  and  the  company  maintained  commodious 
and  well  equipped  business  headquarters  at  342-352  North  Eliza- 
beth Street.  He  is  influential  in  the  affairs  not  only  of  the  Board 
of  Trade,  of  which  he  has  been  a  member  since  1893,  but  also  in 
those  of  the  American  Feed  Manufacturers'  Association,  of  which 
he  is  President.  Mr.  Edwards  was  born  at  North  Fairfield,  Huron 
County,  Ohio,  on  the  27th  of  August,  1865,  and  was  about  four 
years  of  age  when  he  came  with  his  parents,  Sherman  Wright 
Edwards  and  Julie  H.  (Thayer)  Edwards,  to  Chicago,  where  he 
was  reared  to  manhood  and  where  he  gained  his  early  educational 
discipline  in  the  public  schools  of  the  period.  On  the  1st  of  Janu- 
ary, 1884,  a  few  months  prior  to  his  nineteenth  birthday  anniver- 
sary, Mr.  Edwards  initiated  his  business  career  under  most  gracious 
and  auspicious  conditions,  as  he  then  became  a  partner  of  his  father 
in  the  commission  grain  trade,  under  the  firm  name  of  S.  W. 
Edwards  &  Son.  This  effective  alliance  continued  until  the  death 
of  his  father,  on  the  2d  of  January,  1893,  and  incidentally  it  should 
be  recorded  that  his  honored  father  was  one  of  the  vigorous,  loyal 
and  popular  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  the  history  of  which 
may  well  include  a  tribute  to  his  worth  and  his  memory.  Retaining 
the  original  firm  name,  the  son  admitted  to  partnership  in  the 
well  established  and  important  business,  on  the  1st  of  January, 
1894,  Edward  J.  Loomis  and  Fred  W.  Edwards.  With  the  con- 
tinued expansion  of  the  business  it  was  finally  found  advisable,  as 
a  matter  of  commercial  expediency,  to  effect  the  incorporation  of 
the  same  under  the  laws  of  Illinois,  and  in  May,  1907,  the  firm  of 
S.  W.  Edwards  &  Son  passed  out  of  existence  to  give  place  to  the 
corporation  of  the  Edwards  &  Loomis  Company,  of  which  Sherman 
T.  Edwards  served  as  President.  In  1916  the  Edwards  &  Loomis 
Company,  Hales  Elevator  Company  and  the  Kasota  Elevator  Com- 
pany consolidated  under  the  name  of  the  Hales  &  Edwards  Com- 
pany, and  of  this  new  corporation  Mr.  Edwards  is  Vice-President. 
Mr.  Edwards  has  received  the  York  Rite  honors  in  the  Masonic 
fraternity,  in  which  his  maximum  affiliation  is  with  Siloam  Com- 
mandery,  No.  154,  Knights  Templars,  and  he  is  identified  also  with 
the  adjunct  organization,  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  of  the  Nobles 
of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  an  active  and  popular  member  of  the 
Oak  Park  Club,  of  which  he  has  served  as  Vice-President,  and  he 
holds  membership  also  in  the  Union  League,  the  Hamilton  Club 
and  the  Glen  Oak  Country  Club.  He  resides  at  Oak  Park,  and  both 
he  and  his  wife  there  hold  membership  in  the  First  Presbyterian 


114  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

church.  On  the  24th  of  May,  1892,  was  solemnized  the  marriage 
of  Mr.  Edwards  to  Miss  Lucy  Shaw,  of  Chicago,  and  the  two  chil- 
dren of  this  union  are  Daphne  M.,  now  Mrs.  Frank  A.  Bell,  and 
Sherman  Walden. 

Trave  Elmore. — The  city  of  St.  Louis,  another  of  the  impor- 
tant commercial  centers  of  the  middle  west,  has  given  a  popular 
contingent  of  valued  members  to  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago,  and  of  this  number  Trave  Elmore  is  a  progressive  and 
able  young  business  man,  who  represents  large  and  important  com- 
mercial and  industrial  interests,  and  who  is  specially  entitled  to 
definite  recognition  in  this  publication.  He  is  Vice-President  of 
the  Elmore-Schultz  Grain  Company,  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  and 
Ashland,  Illinois,  and  through  this  association  he  is  a  prominent 
representative  of  the  grain  and  milling  business,  so  that  his  active 
identification  with  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  is  the  more  gratify- 
ing to  note  by  reason  of  his  being  a  native  of  the  State  of  Illinois. 
Trave  Elmore  was  born  at  Ashland,  Cass  County,  Illinois,  on  the 
24th  of  January,  1879,  and  is  a  son  of  Valentine  C.  and  Elizabeth 
(Berry)  Elmore.  His  father  has  long  held  prestige  and  distinction 
as  being  one  of  the  representative  farmers,  bankers  and  grain 
dealers  of  Cass  County,  and  has  wielded  large  and  worthy  influence 
in  connection  with  civic  and  material  affairs  in  that  section  of 
Illinois.  He  whose  name  introduces  this  article  received  excellent 
education  along  academic  lines  and  then,  in  consonance  with  his 
ambitious  purpose  and  well  formulated  plans,  he  was  matriculated 
in  the  law  department  of  the  great  University  of  Michigan.  In 
this  institution  he  was  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1899 
and  with  the  well  earned  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws.  The  death 
of  his  mother  occurred  about  this  time  and  caused  him  to  readjust 
his  plans  for  initiating  the  practice  of  law  after  his  graduation.  He 
became  associated  with  his  father  in  the  grain  business  as  junior 
member  of  the  firm  of  V.  C.  &  Trave  Elmore,  and  on  the  2d  of 
February,  1912,  he  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of 
the  City  of  Chicago,  with  which  he  has  since  been  thus  connected 
in  an  active  and  appreciative  way.  About  the  same  time  he  became 
a  member  also  of  the  St.  Louis  Merchants'  Exchange,  and  he  has 
been  prominent  and  influential  as  one  of  the  younger  and  popular 
members  of  this  representative  trade  and  commerce  body,  in  which 
he  has  served  as  a  member  of  various  standing  and  special  commit- 
tees. He  holds  membership  also  in  the  Merchants'  Exchange  of 
Memphis,  Tennessee.  Mr.  Elmore  is  affiliated  with  the  Masonic 
fraternity,  including  the  commandery  of  Knights  Templars  at 
Springfield,  Illinois,  and  the  temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  at  Spring- 
field, Illinois.  In  St.  Louis  he  is  an  active  and  popular  member  of 
the  Missouri  Athletic  Club,  and  he  attends  and  supports  the  Chris- 
tian church,  in  the  faith  of  which  he  was  reared  and  of  which  his 
wife  is  an  active  member.    On  the  10th  of  July,  1902,  was  solemn- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  115 

ized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Elmore  to  Miss  Marilla  Henderson,  who 
was  born  at  Newport,  Rhode  Island,  and  whose  father,  Byron 
Henderson,  was  a  prominent  dealer  in  live  stock  and  a  member 
of  the  National  Stock  Yards  Company  of  Chicago.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Elmore  have  three  children :  Mary  Lee,  born  July  24,  1903  ;  Valen- 
tine C,  Jr.,  born  February  26,  1905,  and  Bettie,  born  December  22, 
1909.  The  Elmore-Schultz  Grain  Company  was  organized  and  incor- 
porated in  the  autumn  of  1912,  and  concerning  Mr.  Elmore,  the 
Vice-President  of  the  company,  duly  appreciative  estimate  is  given 
in  an  article  that  appeared  in  the  American  Elevator  and  Grain 
Trade  of  the  issue  of  April  15,  1916.  The  article  is  so  pertinent 
and  timely  that  the  following  extracts  are  worthy  of  perpetuation 
in  this  connection :  "Sometimes  a  grain  man  finds  the  spotlight  of 
publicity  thrown  on  him  suddenly  because  of  some  sensational  cir- 
cumstance, but  the  greater  number  who  are  now  in  the  forefront 
and  center  of  the  stage  have  worked  their  way  gradually  and  unob- 
trusively from  the  back  drop  of  the  wings.  In  the  ever-changing 
positions  of  the  players  in  the  great  grain  drama  which  is  so  vital 
to  the  life  of  the  world,  the  movement  of  this  actor  or  that  is 
scarcely  noticed  until  we  become  aware  that  a  new  figure  is  in  the 
limelight  and  a  new  voice  speaking  the  leading  lines.  This  has  been 
the  experience  of  Trave  Elmore,  head  of  the  St.  Louis  office  of  the 
Elmore-Schultz  Grain  Company.  John  Schultz,  of  Schultz,  Banzan 
&  Co.,  of  Beardstown,  Illinois,  is  President  of  the  firm,  and  U.  J. 
Sinclair,  of  Ashland,  a  Director  of  the  Illinois  Grain  Dealers'  Asso- 
ciation, is  Secretary.  But  Mr.  Elmore  holds  down  the  St.  Louis  end 
and  has  taken  a  prominent  place  in  that  growing  market.  He  was 
born  and  raised  in  Ashland,  Illinois,  and  after  finishing  his  educa- 
tion at  the  Michigan  University  he  entered  the  grain  business  with 
his  father,  forming  the  V.  C.  &  Trave  Elmore  Company,  which 
operated  a  line  of  ten  elevators  in  the  State.  Four  years  ago  he 
opened  the  St.  Louis  office  of  the  present  firm  and  built  up  there 
a  large  consignment  business.  The  firm  operates  the  Western 
Elevator,  with  a  two  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  bushels'  capacity, 
and  has  a  large  and  efficient  official  and  floor  force  to  take  care 
promptly  and  well  of  all  the  business  that  comes.  They  are  mem- 
bers of  the  Illinois,  Missouri  and  the  National  Grain  Dealers'  Asso- 
ciations." 

William  L.  Etnyre. — The  city  of  Ottawa,  of  LaSalle  County, 
gives  to  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  an  appreciative 
and  popular  member  in  the  person  of  Mr.  Etnyre,  whose  name  was 
enrolled  on  the  membership  list  in  June,  1911,  and  who  has  con- 
sistently availed  himself  of  the  advantages  of  this  great  commer- 
cial organization  in  connection  with  his  well  established  business  as 
a  broker  in  grain  and  provisions.  In  addition  to  this  phase  of  his 
activities  he  also  does  a  substantial  commission  business  in  the 
handling  of  stocks,  and  is  a  correspondent  of  the  representative 


116  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

commission  firm  of  Lamson  Brothers  &  Co.,  of  Chicago.  As  a 
young  man  he  learned  telegraphy  and  his  initiatory  experience 
in  connection  with  the  grain  trade  was  acquired  during  his  asso- 
ciation with  C.  P.  Herrick,  with  whom  he  continued  his  alliance 
until  he  established  his  present  and  independent  brokerage  business 
in  1901.  He  is  one  of  the  vigorous  and  successful  business  men  of 
Ottawa,  is  a  Republican  in  his  political  adherency,  and  is  affiliated 
with  the  Benevolent  &  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Mr.  Etnyre  was 
born  at  Oregon,  Ogle  County,  Illinois,  September  6,  1876,  and  is  a 
son  of  Joseph  and  Rachel  (Petty)  Etnyre,  his  father  having  been 
a  prosperous  merchant  and  highly  honored  citizen  of  Oregon,  where 
his  death  occurred  in  1912.  The  subject  of  this  review  attended  the 
public  schools  of  his  native  city  until  he  had  duly  availed  himself 
of  the  advantages  of  the  high  school,  and  after  learning  telegraphy 
he  was  employed  as  an  operator  until  he  became  associated  with 
the  grain  business,  as  previously  noted.  His  success  has  fully 
justified  his  choice  of  vocation  and  he  is  one  of  the  well  known 
brokers  of  northern  Illinois.  Mr.  Etnyre  wedded  Miss  Ellen  M. 
Cole,  daughter  of  Gibson  Cole,  of  Ottawa,  and  the  one  child  of  this 
union  is  Mildred  Jane,  who  was  born  July  13,  1913. 

Gustav  F.  Ewe. — Mr.  Ewe  has  been  associated  with  the  grain 
business  since  he  was  a  lad  of  sixteen  years,  and  has  become  one  of 
its  prominent  and  influential  representatives  in  the  great  north- 
west, so  that  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  which  claims  him  as  a 
member,  has  gained  by  such  interposition  on  his  part  and  by  the 
incidental  alliance  given  with  Minneapolis,  one  of  the  nation's  most 
important  centers  of  the  grain  and  flour-milling  industry.  In 
Minneapolis  Mr.  Ewe  is  Vice-President  of  the  Van  Dusen,  Har- 
rington Company,  one  of  the  most  extensive  corporations  in  the 
grain  and  elevator  business  of  the  northwest.  This  company 
operates  about  two  hundred  and  fifty  grain  elevators  through  the 
northwestern  section  of  our  national  domain  and  also  controls  a 
large  and  important  lumber  trade.  With  this  Minneapolis  corpora- 
tion Mr.  Ewe  has  been  associated  since  1890,  and  he  has  other  large 
and  important  interests  in  the  Minnesota  metropolis  and  elsewhere. 
He  has  been  one  of  the  most  vigorous  and  influential  members  of 
the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce,  of  which  he  served  as 
President  two  consecutive  terms,  1909-10,  and  an  idea  of  the  scope 
and  diversity  of  his  financial  interests  and  executive  alliances  is 
given  when  it  is  stated  that  he  is  President  of  the  Atlas  Elevator 
Company ;  Vice-President  of  the  National  Elevator  Company,  the 
Pioneer  Elevator  Company,  the  Great  Western  Elevator  Company, 
the  Crescent  Elevator  Company,  the  Interstate  Grain  Company, 
the  Merchants'  Lumber  Company  and  the  Royal  Lumber  Company, 
besides  which  he  is  Secretary  and  Treasurer  of  the  Atlas  Lumber 
Company.  He  is  likewise  Vice-President  of  the  G.  W.  Van  Dusen 
Company,  all  of  these  notable  corporations  maintaining  headquar- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  117 

ters  in  Minneapolis.  In  addition  to  his  connection  with  the  Chi- 
cago Board  of  Trade  and  the  MinneapoHs  Chamber  of  Commerce 
he  also  holds  membership  in  the  Winnipeg  Board  of  Trade.  Gustav 
Frank  Ewe  is  a  scion  of  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  the  Badger 
State,  which  he  is  proud  to  claim  as  the  place  of  his  birth.  He  was 
born  in  the  city  of  LaCrosse,  Wisconsin,  on  the  13th  of  May,  1863. 
and  is  a  son  of  Otto  and  Dora  (Xahnahaner)  Ewe.  His  father 
was  born  and  reared  in  the  city  of  Berlin,  Germany,  and  was  one 
of  the  many  gallant  sons  of  the  German  fatherland  who  came  to 
America  after  the  unsuccessful  revolutionary  movement  that  gave 
to  our  republic  such  noble  citizens  as  the  late  Carl  Schurz  and 
many  others  who  have  played  large  parts  in  the  development  and 
progress  of  Wisconsin.  Otto  Ewe  came  to  the  United  States  in 
1850  and  established  his  home  in  Wisconsin.  He  became  one  of 
the  prominent  business  men  and  influential  citizens  of  La  Crosse, 
where  he  long  conducted  a  substantial  grain  business,  as  a  buyer 
and  shipper,  and  where  he  also  conducted  a  prosperous  general 
merchandise  business,  both  he  and  his  wife  having  passed  the  clos- 
ing years  of  their  lives  in  that  city.  To  the  public  schools  of  his 
native  city  Gustav  F.  Ewe  is  indebted  for  his  early  education,  and 
when  he  was  sixteen  years  old  he  became  actively  associated  with 
his  father's  grain  business,  with  which  important  line  of  industrial 
and  commercial  enterprise  he  has  continued  to  be  identified  during 
the  long  intervening  years.  He  became  grain  agent  for  the  Cargill 
Elevator,  and  he  continued  the  efficient  incumbent  of  this 
position  eight  years,  at  the  expiration  of  which  he  was  advanced 
by  the  company  to  the  office  of  grain  auditor.  As  representative 
of  this  company  he  established  his  residence  in  Minneapolis  in 
1888,  and  he  continued  his  alliance  therewith  until  1890,  wheh  he 
connected  himself  with  the  extensive  business  of  the  Van  Dusen, 
Harrington  Company,  of  which  he  is  now  Vice-President,  and  in 
the  directing  of  the  enormous  business  of  which  he  is  one  of  the 
most  influential  factors.  His  broad  and  varied  experience  and 
authoritative  knowledge  mark  him  as  one  of  the  leading  exponents 
of  the  grain  trade  through  the  northwest,  and  thus  he  is  specially 
valued  as  an  active  and  loyal  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade,  which  he  honors  by  his  character  and  achievement.  Essen- 
tially a  business  man,  Mr.  Ewe  has  had  no  ambition  for  public  office 
or  the  activities  of  practical  politics,  though  his  attitude  is  that  of 
a  progressive  and  public-spirited  citizen.  He  has  received  the 
thirty-second  degree  of  the  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite  of  the 
Masonic  fraternity,  besides  being  affiliated  also  with  the  Mystic 
Shrine ;  he  is  a  popular  member  of  the  leading  clubs  of  Minneapolis, 
and  is  one  of  the  prominent  and  influential  citizens  of  the  Minne- 
sota metropolis,  as  his  various  business  connections  clearly  indi- 
cate. He  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
church  and  the  family  home  in  Minneapolis  is  located  at  2308  Port- 


118  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

land  Avenue.  Mr.  Ewe  was  married  to  Miss  Julia  Moliton,  a 
daughter  of  the  late  Ferdinand  Moliton,  and  the  four  children  of 
this  union  are  William  Frank,  Clark  W.,  Laura  and  Caroline. 

James  William  Femald. — The  men  whose  biographies  have 
given  the  greatest  benefit  to  the  world  are  not  the  men  who, 
through  exceptionally  favorable  opportunity,  have,  in  a  compara- 
tively short  period  of  time,  gained  both  wealth  and  prominence,  but 
the  men  whose  careers  have  shown  a  steady  and  gradual  develop- 
ment. James  W.  Fernald,  one  of  Chicago's  old  and  reliable  busi- 
ness men,  is  eminently  one  who  has  risen  gradually  through  his 
own  efforts,  and  has  established  a  reputation  for  both  fidelity  and 
honesty.  A  native  of  Wolfboro,  New  Hampshire,  he  was  born 
July  24,  1839,  a  son  of  Jonathan  P.  and  Mary  C.  (Pike)  Fernald. 
He  comes  of  old  established  New  England  families  prominent  in 
the  history  of  that  country  for  many  years,  and  he  fully  exemplifies 
the  alert,  enterprising  character  for  which  the  people  of  New  Eng- 
land have  always  been  noted.  He  came  to  Chicago  from  Boston 
in  1867,  and  was  connected  with  Ruggles  &  Crosby  in  the  packing 
business  on  Indiana  Street  (now  Grand  Avenue)  until  the  spring 
of  1868,  when  he  engaged  in  the  pork  packing  business  on  his  own 
account  at  the  corner  of  Michigan  (now  Austin  Avenue)  and  Dear- 
born Streets.  A  successful  business  was  conducted  at  this  place 
until  the  great  fire  of  October,  1871,  reduced  his  plant  to  ashes. 
Mr.  Fernald,  like  thousands  of  others,  practically  lost  all  except 
pluck  and  determination,  and  immediately  in  the  same  month  he 
re-established  himself  in  business  at  the  corner  of  Halsted  and 
Twelfth  Streets,  this  time  in  the  feed  business.  In  1890  he  pur- 
chased the  property  at  the  corner  of  Morgan  and  Fifteenth  Streets, 
on  which  he  erected  the  warehouse  in  which  he  still  continues  to 
carry  on  the  same  line  of  business,  being  probably  the  oldest  man 
in  this  field  of  activity  in  Chicago,  from  point  of  years  in  business. 
During  his  entire  commercial  career,  which  covers  more  than  half 
a  century,  he  was  never  sued,  never  had  any  overdue  paper,  never 
had  any  of  his  paper  protested  and  never  sued  a  man  against  whom 
he  did  not  obtain  a  judgment.  Since  establishing  himself  in  com- 
mercial circles  of  Chicago  Mr.  Fernald  has  done  business  under 
the  title  of  the  J.  W.  Fernald  Company,  of  which  he  is  sole  owner 
and  the  executive  head.  During  this  entire  period  his  name  in  con- 
nection with  any  transaction  has  been  a  guarantee  for  straightfor- 
ward and  honorable  dealing,  and  his  career  stands  without  a 
blemish.  His  house  has  reached  a  high  state  of  prosperity  and 
reputation,  its  business  embracing  large  transactions  in  hay  and 
grain,  and  every  year,  except  that  of  the  "big  fire"  in  1871,  has 
increased  its  assets.  Although  still  identified  in  business,  he  is  not 
as  active  as  in  former  years,  a  persevering  and  well  directed  career 
enabling  him  to  spend  considerable  time  in  travel  and  other  recrea- 
tions.   Although  the  scope  of  his  work  in  various  business  interests 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  119 

has  always  been  broad,  Mr.  Fernald  has  also  given  close  considera- 
tion to  civic,  educational  and  municipal  problems  of  the  city  and 
state,  and  for  many  years  has  been  one  of  the  prime  movers  in  this 
important  work.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Education  of 
Chicago,  in  1890-1-2,  and  made  the  fight,  lasting  about  four  months, 
in  the  Board,  for  the  American  flag  to  be  placed  on  school  build- 
ings. The  measure  was  finally  unanimously  adopted,  establishing 
a  precedent  which  has  since  been  followed  throughout  this  country 
and  over  the  civilized  world.  He  has  also  been  prominent  in 
fraternal  insurance  societies  for  many  years,  and  has  gained  wide 
popularity  for  the  active  interest  he  has  taken  in  the  work.  As 
a  member  and  Past  Grand  Regent  of  the  Illinois  Royal  Arcanum, 
he  has  gained  distinction,  having  served  seven  years  as  a  member 
of  the  Supreme  Council,  six  of  which  he  was  chairman  of  the 
Supreme  Trustees.  He  has  also  been  actively  identified  with 
several  fraternal  insurance  organizations,  among  which  is  the  Royal 
League,  of  which  he  became  a  member  in  1878.  In  1897,  when  its 
reserve  fund  was  established,  he  was  made  chairman  of  the  Invest- 
ment Committee  and  a  member  of  the  Managing  Committee  of  its 
Supreme  Council,  and  has  continued  therein  up  to  the  present  time, 
also  for  the  past  six  years  being  the  Supreme  Treasurer.  He 
became  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  in  1868,  and  in 
1893  was  the  chief  organizer  of  the  Board  of  Trade  Mutual  Benefit 
Association,  of  which  he  was  the  executive  head  for  nineteen  years, 
at  which  time  he  requested  to  be  released  from  further  official 
service.  Mr.  Fernald  has  been  twice  married,  the  first  being  solem- 
nized November  21,  1866,  with  Miss  Sarah  K.  Higgins,  of  Orleans, 
Massachusetts,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  three  children : 
Paul,  Lyn  and  Raymond.  This  wife  died  April  20,  1902,  and  in 
February,  1907,  he  wedded  Mrs.  Belle  M.  Powell,  a  daughter  of 
the  late  ex-Governor  Joel  A.  Matteson,  of  Illinois.  Mr.  Fernald's 
two  sons,  Paul  and  Raymond  Fernald,  are  associated  with  him  in 
business,  while  the  daughter  became  the  wife  of  Thomas  F.  Law- 
rence, Secretary  of  the  State  Life  Insuranc  Company  of  Missouri, 
and  resides  in  St.  Louis.  Throughout  his  entire  public  and  private 
career  Mr.  Fernald  has  had  the  happy  faculty  of  making  friends. 
In  his  home,  in  social  and  business  circles,  he  is  kind  and  courteous, 
and  no  citizen  of  Chicago  is  more  respected  or  enjoys  the  confidence 
of  the  people  or  more  richly  deserves  the  regard  in  which  he  is  held. 
He  is  a  Republican  in  his  political  affiliations,  and  though  he  takes 
no  active  part  in  politics,  he  is  interested  in  political  reform,  and 
always  casts  the  weight  of  his  influence  in  support  of  men  and 
measures  working  for  the  public  good.  He  has  always  stood  for 
the  things  that  are  right,  and  for  the  advancement  of  citizenship, 
and  is  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  modern  improvements  along 
material,  intellectual  and  moral  lines.  He  is  a  member,  and  many 
years  treasurer  of  the  First  Church  of  Chicago  Christian  Scientist. 


120  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

He  is  also  identified  with  the  Hamilton  Club,  being  one  of  its  first 
members. 

Sim  Femandes. — One  of  the  popular  young  exponents  of  the 
grain  commission  business  in  the  city  of  Chicago,  Mr.  Fernandes, 
is  here  associated  with  the  well  known  commission  house  of  W.  H. 
Perrine  &  Co.,  and  he  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  in 
June,  1916,  by  purchase  of  the  seat  of  William  H.  Conley,  of  Lin- 
coln, Illinois.  Virtually  his  entire  active  business  career  has  been 
marked  by  close  and  progressive  alliance  with  the  grain  trade,  his 
initial  experience  having  been  gained  in  1903,  at  Virginia,  Illinois. 
Later  he  became  associated  with  the  E.  B.  Congon  Grain  Com- 
pany, in  his  native  city  of  Jacksonville,  Morgan  County,  Illinois, 
and  this  connection  was  maintained  until  1916,  when  he  formed 
his  present  alliance  with  W.  H.  Perrine  &  Co.  and  established  his 
residence  in  Chicago.  Mr.  Fernandes  was  born  at  Jacksonville, 
Illinois,  December  5,  1886,  and  is  a  son  of  Simeon  and  Alice 
(McCormack)  Fernandes,  his  father  having  long  been  a  general  con- 
tractor of  broad  and  successful  activities.  Mr.  Fernandes  gained 
his  preliminary  education  in  the  public  schools  and  supplemented 
this  by  a  course  in  a  business  college  at  Jacksonville.  In  this 
latter  institution  he  was  graduated  in  1902,  and  since  that  time  his 
business  activities  have  been  consecutively  in  connection  with  the 
commercial  phase  of  the  grain  industry.  In  politics  Mr.  Fernandes 
gives  his  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  he  and  his  wife  are 
members  of  the  Christian  church ;  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Masonic 
fraternity,  including  the  Mystic  Shrine,  and  is  identified  also  with 
the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of 
America.  Mr.  Fernandes  wedded  Miss  Frances  Clarence,  daughter 
of  William  Clarence,  of  Virginia,  Cass  County,  Illinois,  and  the  two 
children  of  this  union  are  Sim  Clark  and  Frances  Grace. 

Harry  B.  Field. — A  resident  of  Chicago  since  his  boyhood,  Mr. 
Field  has  here  achieved  distinctive  success  as  a  representative  of 
the  grain  commission  business  and  as  an  active  and  effective 
operator  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  his  membership  in  which  had  its 
inception  in  1891.  Harry  B.  Field  was  born  in  the  city  of  Peoria, 
Illinois,  on  the  30th  of  March,  1867,  and  is  a  son  of  Frank  and 
Sophia  (Kellogg)  Field,  the  active  career  of  his  father  having  been 
principally  one  of  close  association  with  the  milling  business,  and 
the  family  home  having  been  established  in  Chicago  in  1877.  He 
whose  name  introduces  this  article  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools 
for  his  early  education,  and  in  the  Chicago  schools  he  continued 
his  studies  until  1885,  when  he  was  graduated  in  the  Lake  View 
High  School.  In  the  same  year  he  became  associated  with  one  of 
the  representative  concerns  engaged  in  the  wholesale  boot  and  shoe 
trade  in  Chicago,  and  with  this  line  of  enterprise  he  continued  his 
identification  until  1891,  when  he  became  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  and  initiated  his  activities  in  the  commission  business,  of 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  121 

which  he  has  since  continued  an  active  and  resourceful  exponent. 
In  a  fraternal  way  Mr.  Field  is  affiliated  with  the  National  Union, 
and  in  his  home  locality,  in  the  suburb  of  Ravenswood,  he  holds 
membership  in  the  Ravenswood  Club.  In  the  year  1895  was 
recorded  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Field  to  Miss  Hattie  Spangenberg, 
and  to  their  one  child  they  appropriately  gave  the  personal  name 
of  Chicago's  departed  and  loved  poet,  Eugene  Field,  the  identical 
family  name  making  the  application  the  more  significant. 

John  E.  Fitzgerald. — He  whose  name  initiates  this  paragraph 
is  one  of  the  well  known  non-resident  members  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago.  He  is  secretary  and  general  man- 
ager of  the  Hammond  Distilling  Company,  which  controls  one  of 
the  important  industrial  enterprises  in  the  city  of  Hammond, 
Indiana,  and  the  large  grain  demands  of  which  make  specially  con- 
sistent the  active  affiliation  of  its  secretary  with  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade.  Mr.  Fitzgerald  was  born  in  New  York  City  on  the  3d 
of  February,  1865,  a  son  of  James  and  Mary  (Luddy)  Fitzgerald. 
James  Fitzgerald  was  born  and  reared  in  Ireland,  where  he  learned 
the  cooper's  trade,  and  he  was  a  young  man  at  the  time  of  his 
immigration  to  the  United  States,  both  he  and  his  wife  having 
been  residents  of  Chicago  at  the  time  of  their  death  and  both  hav- 
ing been  lifelong  communicants  of  the  Catholic  church.  John  E. 
Fitzgerald  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  parochial  and  public 
schools  of  Chicago,  where  the  family  home  was  established  when 
he  was  but  three  months  old.  He  early  initiated  his  association 
with  business  affairs  and  he  has  become  one  of  the  prominent 
exponents  of  the  distilling  industry.  The  Hammond  Distilling 
Company  was  organized  and  incorporated  in  1901,  and  the  well 
equipped  plant  of  this  industrial  concern  has  a  capacity  for  the 
output  of  five  hundred  barrels  a  day,  the  product  being  maintained 
at  the  highest  standard.  Mr.  Fitzgerald  was  the  originator  and 
promoter  of  this  now  extensive  industry,  and  the  plant  of  the 
company  was  constructed  at  a  cost  of  more  than  five  hundred 
thousand  dollars,  the  average  annual  business  having  now  attained 
an  aggregate  of  six  million  dollars.  Mr.  Fitzgerald  is  a  heavy 
stockholder  in  the  Betz  Manufacturing  Company,  which  is  engaged 
in  the  manufacturing  of  surgical  instruments,  at  Hammond,  and  he 
is  also  Vice-President  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Hammond. 
Forceful  initiative  and  administrative  ability  have  marked  the 
course  of  Mr.  Fitzgerald  and  he  is  one  of  the  most  liberal  and  pro- 
gressive citizens  and  business  men  of  Hammond.  He  is  a  Demo- 
crat in  politics.  In  the  year  1901  Mr.  Fitzgerald  wedded  Miss 
Laura  G.  Sexton,  a  daughter  of  Austin  O.  Sexton,  of  Chicago,  and 
the  only  child  of  this  union  is  a  daughter:  Laura  M. 

Edward  M.  Flesh. — The  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago 
numbers  Edward  Matthew  Flesh  among  its  active  members,  and  in 
his  home  city  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  he  is  one  of  the  most  prominent 


122  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

and  influential  representatives  of  the  grain  trade,  as  President  of 
the  C.  H.  Albers  Grain  &  Commission  Company.  He  is  a  valued 
and  progressive  member  of  the  St.  Louis  Merchants'  Exchange, 
and  both  in  his  native  city  and  in  Chicago  it  may  consistently  be 
said  that  his  circle  of  friends  is  limited  only  by  that  of  his  acquaint- 
ances. Mr.  Flesh  was  born  in  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  on  the  15th  of 
August,  1869,  and  is  a  son  of  Matthew  M.  and  Susan  (Carter) 
Flesh.  His  father  was  born  in  Germany,  but  passed  the  major  part 
of  his  long  and  useful  life  in  the  State  of  Missouri,  where  he 
achieved  success  and  prestige  as  a  business  man  and  where  he 
became  an  influential  factor  in  public  affairs.  He  was  active  in  poli- 
tics for  a  long  period  and  at  one  time  served  as  mayor  of  Jefferson 
City,  the  capital  of  Missouri.  For  many  years  he  was  senior  mem- 
ber of  the  firm  of  Flesh  &  Mook,  one  of  the  oldest  and  most  impor- 
tant paint  contracting  firms  in  the  city  of  St.  Louis.  In  his  native 
city  Edward  M.  Flesh  duly  profited  by  the  advantages  afforded  in 
the  public  schools  and  also  those  of  Smith's  Academy.  At  the 
age  of  sixteen  years  he  became  associated  with  his  father's  business 
and  served  a  thorough  apprenticeship  to  the  painter's  trade.  As 
a  journeyman  he  followed  the  work  of  his  trade  only  a  brief  interval, 
as  he  obtained  a  position  as  clerk  in  the  establishment  of  the  Collier 
White  Lead  &  Oil  Company,  of  St.  Louis.  By  effective  service  he 
rose  to  the  position  of  manager  of  the  shot-tower  department  of 
the  manufacturing  business  of  this  representative  company,  and  he 
remained  as  a  valued  employe  of  the  company  until  1895,  when  he 
resigned  his  position  to  accept  that  of  superintendent  of  the  linseed 
oil  department  of  the  business  of  the  National  Linseed  Oil  Com- 
pany at  its  branch  establishment  in  the  city  of  Chicago.  Mr.  Flesh 
continued  his  association  with  the  Chicago  offices  of  this  company 
until  1899,  and  in  1896,  to  facilitate  his  service  in  the  handling  of 
the  affairs  of  his  department  of  the  enterprise,  he  applied  for  and 
obtained  membership  in  the  Board  of  Trade,  his  seat  having  been 
purchased  for  eight  hundred  and  fifty  dollars.  He  thereafter  rep- 
resented the  National  Linseed  Oil  Company  on  the  floor  of  the 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade  until  1899,  when  he  resigned  his  position 
with  the  company  and  sold  his  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade 
for  about  the  same  price  he  had  paid  for  it.  In  1902  he 
again  purchased  a  seat  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago,  but  at 
this  time  the  transaction  involved  his  expending  the  sum  of  two 
thousand  nine  hundred  dollars.  Upon  resigning  his  executive  posi- 
tion with  the  National  Linseed  Oil  Company  Mr.  Flesh  returned 
to  St.  Louis  and  became  one  of  the  interested  principals  of  the 
Albers  Grain  &  Commission  Company,  in  which  he  succeeded 
John  W.  Kauffman  in  the  office  of  Vice-President,  Mr.  Kaufman 
having  been  at  one  time  President  of  the  St.  Louis  Merchants' 
Exchange  and  having  long  been  a  prominent  miller  and  grain  man 
of  the  middle  west.     The  Albers  Company  was  organized   in  the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  123 

later  '60s  by  Charles  H.  Albers,  and  it  owns  and  operates  at  the 
present  time  five  large  grain  elevators  of  the  best  modern  type. 
The  company  not  only  has  large  elevators  at  East  St.  Louis,  but 
also  at  Venice  and  Danville,  Illinois.  From  the  time  of  associating 
himself  with  this  old  and  important  corporation  Mr.  Flesh  has  been 
virtually  its  chief  executive,  and  he  has  held  the  office  of  President 
of  the  concern  since  1912.  He  became  a  member  of  the  St.  Louis 
Merchants'  Exchange  while  he  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Collier 
Lead  &  Oil  Company  and  prior  to  the  attaining  of  his  legal 
majority.  He  is  one  of  the  honored  and  influential  members  of  this 
representative  commercial  organization  at  the  present  time,  and 
is  known  as  one  of  the  substantial,  loyal  and  progressive  captains 
of  industry  in  his  native  city.  It  should  be  noted  also  that  Mr. 
Flesh  was  actively  concerned  in  the  organization  of  the  National 
Council  of  Grain  Exchanges,  on  the  executive  board  of  which  he 
is  serving  at  the  time  of  this  writing,  in  the  year  1916.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  St.  Louis  Club,  the  Missouri  Athletic  Club  and  the 
Noonday  Club,  and  has  been  President  of  the  St.  Louis  Automobile 
Club  since  1912.  He  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Protes- 
tant Episcopal  church  and  are  active  members  of  the  cathedral 
parish  of  Christ  church.  Mr.  Flesh,  a  man  who  has  won  advance- 
ment and  worthy  success  through  his  own  ability  and  efforts,  is 
essentially  liberal,  loyal  and  progressive  as  a  citizen  and  has  been 
active  and  influential  in  the  furtherance  of  measures  and  enterprises 
tending  to  advance  the  general  welfare.  As  chairman  of  the  execu- 
tive committee  of  the  good  roads  organization  he  was  specially 
active  and  influential  in  promoting  the  passage  of  the  three  million 
dollar  bond  issue  that  was  voted  upon  by  the  Citizens  of  St.  Louis 
County  in  1916,  and  that  is  to  result  in  the  expenditure  of  an 
ample  sum  in  improving  the  roads  of  the  county.  He  represented 
the  anti-option  committee  at  Washington,  D.  C,  and  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  executive  committee  which  presented  the  claims  of  the 
pure  food  bills  before  Congress  in  1912  and  1914.  With  no  political 
ambitions  of  a  personal  order,  Mr.  Flesh  has  refused  invariably 
to  become  a  candidate  for  public  office  of  any  order,  but  he  is  a 
staunch  and  loyal  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the  Democratic  party 
and  is  admirably  fortified  in  his  views  concerning  governmental 
and  economic  policies.  On  the  1st  of  October,  1890,  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Flesh  to  Miss  Hetta  May  Albers,  daughter 
of  the  late  Charles  Henry  Albers,  the  founder  of  the  Albers  Grain 
&  Commission  Company.  Hetta,  the  only  child  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Flesh,  died  at  the  age  of  eight  years. 

James  J.  Fones. — An  active  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
since  1891  and  a  Director  of  the  same  for  a  period  of  three  years, 
Mr.  Fones  has  been  one  of  the  resourceful  and  influential  figures 
in  the  cash  grain  business  represented  on  the  Board  and  has  long 
controlled    in   an    independent    way,   with   no   partnership   or   cor- 


124  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

porate  alliances,  a  substantial  and  successful  business  in  this  branch 
of  the  commission  grain  trade  in  Chicago.  He  has  made  a  close 
study  of  the  line  of  enterprise  that  has  thus  engrossed  his  time 
and  attention  and  the  high  reputation  which  he  has  gained  consti- 
tutes a  most  valuable  business  asset.  Mr.  Fones  was  born  at  East 
Greenwich,  Rhode  Island,  on  the  12th  of  February,  1860,  and  is  a 
son  of  James  J.  and  Margaret  (Dunn)  Fones.  In  his  youth  he 
attended  the  East  Greenwich  Academy  and  also  an  excellent  school 
conducted  in  the  city  of  Providence,  Rhode  Island,  under  the 
auspices  of  the  Society  of  Friends.  In  1880,  when  twenty  years 
of  age,  he  became  associated  with  the  grain  elevator  business  at 
Wall  Lake,  Iowa,  and  with  this  line  of  enterprise  he  continued  his 
identification  until  he  established  his  residence  in  Chicago  in  1890. 
The  knowledge  and  experience  which  he  thus  gained  in  the  initial 
period  of  his  business  career  have  proved  of  distinct  value  to  him 
in  his  operations  as  a  commission  merchant,  and  his  success  as  a 
representative  of  this  important  line  of  commercial  enterprise  dur- 
ing the  period  of  his  independent  operations  in  Chicago  has  been  of 
unequivocal  order.  In  the  year  1883  was  solemnized  the  marriage 
of  Mr.  Fones  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Wilcox,  of  East  Greenwich,  Rhode 
Island,  and  they  have  three  children :  Grace,  Oceanna  and  John 
Harris. 

George  S.  Forbes. — Vigor,  resourcefulness  and  enthusiasm 
have  characterized  the  activities  of  George  Shipman  Forbes  as  one 
of  the  representative  younger  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  his 
identification  with  which  as  a  member  had  its  inception  on  the  31st 
of  August,  1905.  His  business  career  has  been  one  in  which 
advancement  has  been  gained  through  personal  ability  and  ambi- 
tious and  well  directed  efTort,  and  since  1909  he  has  been  an  inde- 
pendent operator  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  where  he  specialized  in 
the  buying  and  selling  of  wheat,  his  success  having  been  normal 
and  stable  and  marked  by  clarity  and  discrimination  of  judgment 
in  connection  with  the  trend  of  the  grain  market.  Mr.  Forbes  was 
born  in  Chicago  on  the  21st  of  September,  1879,  and  is  a  son  of 
Daniel  and  Caroline  (Shipman)  Forbes.  In  the  public  schools  of 
his  native  city  he  continued  his  studies  until  he  had  availed  him- 
self of  the  advantages  of  the  high  school,  and  he  then  entered  the 
Lewis  Institute,  one  of  the  admirable  educational  institutions  of 
Chicago,  in  which  he  was  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of 
1900.  Prior  to  this  he  had  gained  valuable  experience  through  his 
association  with  the  leather  manufacturing  business  conducted  by 
his  father,  and  soon  after  his  graduation  in  Lewis  Institute  he 
associated  himself  with  the  well  known  Board  of  Trade  firm  of 
McReynolds  &  Co.,  and  incidentally  began  his  novitiate  in  connec- 
tion with  the  great  commercial  organization  of  which  he  is  now 
an  active  and  popular  member,  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago.    His  ability,  initiative  and  close  application  gained  to  him 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO'  125 

advancement  in  the  business  of  the  firm  mentioned,  and  he  was 
finally  made  traffic  manager  for  the  concern,  in  which  position 
he  not  only  had  charge  of  all  grain  shipments,  but  also  of  the  grain 
elevators  of  the  firm  in  Chicago,  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  and  Mobile, 
Alabama.  From  1906  until  1909  Mr.  Forbes  was  employed  in  special 
executive  capacities  by  several  well  known  firms  represented  on  the 
Board  of  Trade,  and  in  the  latter  year  he  initiated  his  independent 
career  as  a  grain  broker,  his  energy,  judgment  and  careful  methods 
having  resulted  in  his  achieving  definite  success  and  prestige  as  a 
grain  operator  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  his  office  headquarters 
being  maintained  in  the  Postal  Telegraph  Building.  Mr.  Forbes  is 
most  loyal  to  his  native  city  and  takes  lively  interest  in  all  things 
pertaining  to  its  civic  and  material  welfare  and  progress.  He  has 
never  entered  the  arena  of  practical  politics,  but  he. gives  his  alle- 
giance to  the  Republican  party.  In  the  time-honored  Masonic 
fraternity  he  has  received  the  chivalric  degree  of  the  York  Rite,  as 
a  member  of  Siloam  Commandery,  Knights  Templar,  and  he  is 
affiliated  also  with  Medinah  Temple  of  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order 
of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  On  the  21st  of  February,  1912, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Forbes  to  Miss  Effie  Stevens, 
and  they  have  one  son,  George  Stevens  Forbes. 

Henry  A.  Foss. — Broad  and  accurate  is  the  information  that 
gives  to  the  popular  weighmaster  of  the  Board  of  Trade  his  authori- 
tative status  in  connection  with  the  ponderous  operations  of  this 
important  commercial  body,  and  of  this  responsible  office  Henry 
Augustus  Foss  has  been  the  efficient  and  valued  incumbent  for  a 
period  of  nearly  twenty  years,  during  which  his  administration  has 
been  such  as  to  give  him  inviolable  vantage  place  in  the  confidence 
and  esteem  of  the  other  members  of  the  Board.  Mr.  Foss  holds 
unobtrusively  the  honors  of  authorship,  since  he  has  compiled 
three  volumes  of  semi-technical  and  notably  valuable  order.  In  1901 
was  issued  from  the  press  his  work  entitled  "Scales,  Estimating, 
Coopering."  In  1903  was  published  his  second  volume, 
"Facts  and  Factors  in  Accurate  Weighing,"  and  in  1908 
he  issued  his  excellent  "Shippers'  Manual."  From  1879 
to  1898  Mr.  Foss  held  the  position  of  receiver's  agent 
for  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad,  and  his  experience  gained  in  this 
connection  admirably  fortified  him  for  that  of  weighmaster  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  which  position  he  assumed  in  July,  1898.  On  the 
Board  he  has  served  as  assistant  to  the  Market  Report  Committee 
and  the  Membership  Committee,  and  his  ability  and  loyalty  have 
made  him  a  valuable  factor  in  connection  with  the  general  activities 
of  the  Board.  His  civic  progressiveness  is  further  evidenced  by  his 
membership  in  the  Chicago  Association  of  Commerce.  Mr.  Foss  is 
a  scion  of  staunch  New  England  stock  and  was  born  at  Thornton, 
Grafton  County,  New  Hampshire,  on  the  17th  of  March.  1859.  He 
is  a  son  of  Martin  Henry  Foss  and  Elizabeth  Hanna  (Elliott)  Foss 


126  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

and  was  about  four  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the  family  removal 
to  Chicago.  In  the  city  that  is  now  his  home  he  availed  himself 
fully  of  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools,  after  which  he  con- 
tinued his  studies  in  Lake  Forest  Academy  and  in  Hillsdale  Col- 
lege, at  Hillsdale,  Michigan.  He  was  about  twenty  years  old  when 
he  entered  the  grain  business  in  the  State  grain  inspection  depart- 
ment. Three  years  later  he  assumed  the  position  of  receiver's 
agent  on  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad.  He  served  as  receiver's 
agent  satisfactorily  until  he  assumed  his  present  important  office  as 
weighmaster  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  body  he  became  a 
member  in  1881.  He  has  maintained  lively  interest  in  all  things 
touching  the  progress  and  well-being  of  Chicago  and  is  a  loyal  and 
public-spirited  citizen,  though  independent  in  his  political  attitude 
and  never  an  aspirant  for  public  office.  He  is  identified  with  the 
following  named  and  representative  social  organizations:  The 
Kenwood  Club  and  Union  League  Club.  On  the  1st  of  July,  1883, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Foss  to  Miss  Miriam  Rum- 
baugh,  of  Cortland,  Ohio,  and  they  have  seven  children :  Vera  A., 
Marion  H.,  Elizabeth  E.,  Charlotte,  Samuel  B.,  Frank  K.  and  Mar- 
garet. 

Gerstenberg  &  Co. — The  House  of  Gerstenberg.  It  was  in  the 
pioneer  days  immediately  preceding  the  great  Civil  War,  1860-62, 
that  Carl  Gerstenberg  founded  the  great  commission  house  which 
its  friends,  and  they  are  legion,  are  fond  of  calling  the  House  of 
Gerstenberg.  It  began  in  a  small  way  and,  of  necessity,  dealt  in  all 
that  the  farmers  of  the  western  prairies  had  to  ofifer  for  sale.  This 
included  live  stock,  dressed  meats,  grain  and  all  the  products  of  the 
farm,  for  the  commission  man  of  those  older  days  came  near  to  being 
a  general  merchant.  The  relations  between  producers  and  commis- 
sion merchant  were  also  of  a  much  more  intimate  nature  than  they 
are  today,  and  thus  the  personality  of  the  commission  man  was  a 
large  factor  in  securing  and  holding  business.  Those  who  dealt  with 
Carl  Gerstenberg  found  that  he  was  not  only  scrupulously  honest, 
remitting  promptly  to  the  farm  the  much-needed  currency,  but  that 
he  made  his  clients'  interests  his  own  and  secured  for  them  all  that 
could  be  obtained  for  their  shipments.  This  was  the  foundation 
stone  upon  which  was  builded  the  House  of  Gerstenberg.  As  the 
business  of  Chicago  increased  to  proportions  far  outstripping  even 
the  imagination  of  those  earlier  days,  it  became  necessary  that  cer- 
tain concerns  should  concentrate  their  attention  upoji  different 
branches  of  the  trade.  Live  stock  was  the  first  to  differentiate,  and 
the  House  of  Gerstenberg  gradually  withdrew  from  this  trade,  con- 
fining itself  to  grain  and  produce.  At  their  old-time  location  on 
Kinzie  street  the  firm,  in  which  the  two  sons,  Erich  Gerstenberg  and 
Adolph  Gerstenberg  had  joined  with  their  father,  continued  in  both 
branches,  grain  and  other  produce,  until  1884,  after  which  they  con- 
fined their  eflforts  entirely  to  the  grain  commission  business.     Of 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  127 

the  younger  generation  Erich  Gerstenberg  became  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago  in  1879,  and  Adolph  Gerstenberg  in  1882. 
Both  have  taken  active  part,  not  only  in  the  business  of  the  grain 
market,  but  in  the  aiTairs  of  the  Association,  and  their  names  are 
frequently  mentioned  in  this  history  as  participants  in  the  stirring 
events  which  go  to  make  up  the  life  story  of  the  Board  of  Trade. 
Their  present  finely-equipped  offices,  305-315  South  LaSalle  Street, 
bear  but  remote  resemblance  to  the  business  rooms  occupied  by  the 
concern  in  1860,  but  the  firm  maintains  the  same  policies  and  gives 
the  same  careful,  personal  attention  to  the  business  of  its  clients  as 
it  did  when  it  first  embarked  upon  its  mercantile  career.  The  firm 
has  exceptional  facilities  for  handling  barley,  gives  special  care  to  the 
sample  grain  trade  and  does  a  large  business  in  grain,  seeds  and  mill 
feed.  The  sons  have  in  every  way  maintained  the  honor  and  prestige 
of  the  House  of  Gerstenberg  and  have  increased  its  business  until  it 
stands  today  as  one  of  the  oldest  and  best-known  commission  houses 
operating  on  the  Board  of  Trade. 

Edward  L.  Glaser. — As  President  of  the  corporation  known  as 
Rosenbaum  Brothers,  Mr.  Glaser  is  a  prominent  and  resourceful 
representative  of  the  grain  and  elevator  business  in  the  great  west- 
ern metropolis  which  figures  as  the  center  of  gigantic  activities 
in  this  line  of  enterprise,  and  he  is  one  of  the  steadfast,  progressive 
and  valued  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  with  which  he  has  been 
actively  identified  since  1893,  and  in  which  he  has  given  specially 
circumspect  and  effective  service  as  a  member  of  the  Committees  on 
Grain,  Transportation  and  Building.  His  status  as  a  member  of 
the  Board  and  as  a  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen  entitles  him 
to  specific  representation  in  this  history  of  the  Board  of  Trade. 
Mr.  Glaser  was  born  in  the  city  of  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  on  the  23d  of 
October,  1861,  and  is  a  son  of  Louis  and  Adelina  Glaser,  who 
came  to  Chicago  and  established  a  home  when  he  was  a  boy.  Mr. 
Glaser  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  Chicago  for  his  early 
educational  advantages  and  it  has  been  within  his  powers  and 
province  to  keep  in  touch  with  the  advancing  stages  of  progress 
that  have  dignified  this  city  since  he  witnessed,  as  a  lad,  the  depre- 
dations of  the  great  fire  of  1871.  Through  special  predilection  for 
and  appreciation  of  the  commission  business,  Mr.  Glaser  early  found 
opportunity  to  identify  himself  therewith,  and  his  rise  to  promi- 
nence and  influence  in  this  important  field  of  enterprise  has  been 
gained  through  his  own  ability,  resolute  purpose  and  well  ordered 
endeavors.  In  1898,  recognizing  the  commission  business  did  not 
have  a  brilliant  future,  they  started  in  the  elevator  business,  stor- 
ing and  distributing  grain,  having  now  five  terminal  elevators.  He 
stands  exponent  of  liberal  and  progressive  citizenship  and  his 
loyalty  to  his  home  city  is  of  the  most  insistent  order.  He  is 
affiliated  with  such  representative  civic  organizations  as  the  Stand- 
ard Club,  the  Traffic  Club,  the  City  Club  and  the   Lake  Shore  Coun- 


128  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

try  Club,  and  he  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  Sinai  Congre- 
gation, whose  beautiful  new  temple  of  worship  is  one  of  the  finest 
ecclesiastical  edifices  in  Chicago.  On  the  21st  of  September,  1893, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Glaser  to  Miss  Etta  Rosen- 
baum,  who  was  reared  and  educated  in  Chicago,  and  their  only  child 
is  Morris  Rosenbaum  Glaser. 

Henry  L.  Goemann. — As  President  and  general  manager  of 
the  Goemann  Grain  Company,  of  Mansfield,  Ohio,  the  subject  of 
this  review  is  one  of  the  leading  exponents  of  the  grain  business 
in  the  Buckeye  State,  and  it  is  specially  interesting  to  record  that 
Mr.  Goemann  has  not  only  been  closely  identified  with  the  grain 
business  from  his  youth  but  also  that  he  was  connected  actively 
with  the  operations  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago 
for  twenty  years  prior  to  returning  from  this  city  to  his  native 
State,  where  his  activities  have  made  him  a  leading  figure  in  the 
buying  and  shipping  of  grain,  the  company  of  which  he  is  President 
giving  special  attention  to  the  handling  of  high-grade  rye;  The 
company's  elevator  at  Mansfield  has  a  capacity  for  the  handling  of 
sixty-five  thousand  bushels  of  grain  daily  and  for  the  shipping  of 
fifty-two  cars  a  day,  the  plant  being  essentially  modern  in  all  its 
facilities  and  covering  an  area  of  three  and  one-half  acres  of  ground 
In  connection  with  the  extensive  business  about  thirty-five  em- 
ployes are  retained,  and  a  branch  office  of  the  company  is  estab- 
lished in  Chicago,  Mr.  Goemann  having  become  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  in  1887  and  his  identification  therewith  having  been 
continuous  during  the  intervening  period  of  virtually  thirty  years. 
He  is  one  of  the  valued  and  influential  citizens  and  business  men 
of  the  thriving  and  vigorous  city  of  Mansfield,  was  elected  Presi- 
dent of  the  Mansfield  Chamber  of  Commerce  in  January,  1916,  the 
estimate  placed  upon  his  administration  being  shown  in  his  re-elec- 
tion in  January,  1917.  As  a  young  man  Mr.  Goemann  engaged  in 
the  grain  and  flour  business  in  his  native  city  of  Cincinnati,  and 
he  had  become  successfully  established  in  the  gsain  trade  by  the 
time  he  had  attained  to  his  legal  majority.  As  already  noted,  he 
passed  a  period  of  twenty  years  in  Chicago,  his  connection  with  the 
grain  trade  having  continued  efifectively  during  this  time.  Upon 
leaving  this  city  he  went  to  Toledo,  Ohio,  where  he  gained  prece- 
dence as  one  of  the  leading  grain  men  of  that  important  industrial 
center.  There  he  remained  until  1914,  when  he  removed  to  Mans- 
field and  became  President  and  general  manager  of  the  Goemann 
Grain  Company,  which  was  organized  by  him  in  that  year  and 
which  is  incorporated  under  the  laws  of  Ohio.  He  is  a  liberal  and 
public-spirited  citizen  and  is  a  stalwart  advocate  of  the  principles 
of  the  Republican  party.  Henry  L.  Goemann  was  born  in  the  city 
of  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  on  the  5th  of  June,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of  John  H. 
and  Sylvester  (Kiser)  Goemann,  both  natives  of  Germany.  John 
H.   Goemann,  a  cabinetmaker  by  trade,  came  to  America  in   the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  129 

autumn  of  1849  and  established  his  home  in  the  city  of  Cincinnati, 
where  he  became  a  prosperous  business  man  and  well  known 
citizen,  and  where  both  he  and  his  wife  passed  the  remainder  of 
their  lives,  secure  in  the  high  regard  of  all  who  knew  them.  Henry 
L.  Goemann  was  afforded  the  advantages  of  the  excellent  public 
schools  of  Cincinnati,  where  he  was  reared  to  adult  age  and  where 
he  gained  his  initial  experience  in  the  grain  business,  as  already 
noted.  As  a  young  man  Mr.  Goemann  wedded  Miss  Alice  Kiser, 
whose  death  occurred  at  an  early  age  and  who  is  survived  by  no 
children.  For  his  second  wife  Mr.  Goemann  married  Miss  Edith 
Philo,  and  the  one  child  of  this  union  is  Elsie,  who  is  the  wife  of 
Park  Husted,  a  citizen  of  Toledo,  Ohio. 

Louis  P.  Goldsborough. — One  of  the  interested  principals  in  the 
grain  commission  firm  of  Goldsborough  Bpothers,  of  Baltimore, 
Maryland,  Louis  Piper  Goldsborough,  has  been  actively  and  suc- 
cessfully engaged  in  the  grain  business  in  his  native  city  since  1887, 
and  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  with 
full  appreciation  of  its  history,  functions  and  privileges,  so  that  he 
is  eligible  for  representation  in  this  publication.  He  was  born  in 
Baltimore  on  the  2d  of  June,  1857,  and  is  a  son  of  Henry  H.  and 
Anna  M.  (Kennard)  Goldsborough,  his  father  having  been  for  many 
years  one  of  the  able  lawyers  and  members  of  the  bar  of  the  city  of 
Baltimore,  where  he  died  in  1899,  when  venerable  in  years  and 
secure  in  well-earned  honors.  Louis  P.  Goldsborough  continued 
his  studies  in  the  public  schools  until  he  had  availed  himself  duly 
of  the  advantages  of  the  high  school,  and  his  earlier  business  expe- 
rience included  clerical  service  in  a  railroad  office  in  Baltimore.  In 
1882,  when  twenty-five  years  of  age,  he  became  associated  with  the 
commission  grain  business,  with  which  he  has  since  continued  to  be 
actively  and  influentially  identified  and  in  which  his  independent 
operations  were  begun  in  1887,  so  that  his  association  with  this 
important  line  of  commercial  enterprise  in  his  native  city  has  cov- 
ered a  period  of  more  than  thirty  years.  While  earnestly  applying 
himself  to  business  Mr.  Goldsborough  has  not  wavered  in  civic 
loyalty  as  expressed  in  progressive  and  liberal  citizenship,  and  his 
political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  Republican  party.  He  is  one  of 
the  veteran  members  of  the  Baltimore  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and 
in  the  building  of  the  same  the  offices  of  his  firm  are  established. 
His  residence  is  at  35  West  Preston  street,  and  he  has  a  wide  circle 
of  friends  in  both  the  business  and  social  circles  of  his  native  city. 
He  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
church  and  hold  membership  in  the  parish  of  Christ  church.  Mr. 
Goldsborough  was  married  to  Miss  Caroline  E.  Cheezum,  daughter 
of  John  W.  Cheezum,  of  Talbot  County,  Maryland. 

Edwin  A.  Graff. — From  the  time  of  his  youth  to  the  present 
Mr.  Graff  has  been  closely  associated  with  the  grain  business,  and  in 
connection  with  the  same  it  has  been  within  the  compass  of  his 


130  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

powers  and  ambition  to  develop  and  upbuild  one  of  the  represen- 
tative malting  enterprises  of   the  nation,   this   prestige   being  his 
through  the  medium  of  the  Columbia  Malting  Company,  of  which 
splendid  Chicago  industrial  concern  he  was  the  organizer  and  of 
which  he  has  served  as  President  from  its  inception.    Mr.  Graflf  has 
been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  since 
1894  and  has  been  a  quiet,  dignified  but  loyal  and  progressive  rep- 
resentative of  this  organization,  as  has  he  also  of  the  more  important 
business  activities  of  the  city  of  his  adoption,  it  having  been  his  to 
make  the  plant  and  operations  of  the  Columbia  Malting  Company 
serve  as  a  veritable  model  in  this  field  of  industrial  enterprise,  be- 
sides which,  as  a  man  of  education  and  broad  outlook,  he  stands 
exponent  of  the  best  type  of  civic  loyalty  and  well-ordered  public 
spirit.     Edwin  Adolphus  Graff  was  born  at  Mount  Vernon,  the 
judicial  center  of  Knox  County,  Ohio,  and  the  date  of  his  nativity 
was  April  22,  1851.     He  is  a  son  of  John  A.  and  Mary  (Haynes) 
Graff,  who  were  residents  of  the  State  of  Pennsylvania  at  the  time 
of  their  death,  the  greater  part  of  the  active  career  of  the  father 
having  been  given  to  produce  and  grain  merchandising.    After  hav- 
ing duly  profited  by  the  advantages  aflforded  in  the  public  schools 
Mr.   Graff  completed  a  higher  academic  course   in  the  Western 
University  of  Pennsylvania,  and  in   1872,  shortly  after  attaining 
to  his  legal  majority,  he  engaged  in  the  grain  and  produce  business 
in  the  city  of  Pittsburgh,  that  State.    There  he  built  up  a  large  and 
substantial  business  and  there  he  continued  his  operations  until 
1897,  when  he  came  to  Chicago  and  effected  the  organization  of 
the  Columbia  Malting  Company,  which,  under  his  progressive  re- 
gime, has  attained  to  secure  vantage  place  as  representing  one  of  the 
model  institutions  of  its  kind  in  the  entire  United  States,  with  a 
business  of  wide  and  important  ramifications  and  with  a  reputation 
that  in  itself  constitutes  a  strong  commercial  asset.     Of  this  sub- 
stantial company  Mr.  Graff  has  been  President  from  the  beginning, 
and  he  is  also  its  representative  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  the 
province  and  functions  of  which  he  is  loyally  appreciative.     Mr. 
GrafT  is  found  aligned  as  an  advocate  and  supporter  of  the  cause 
of  the  Republican  party,  is  a  member  of  the  Union  League  and  the 
South  Shore  Country  Clubs  of  Chicago,  and  also  of  the  Duquesne 
Club  of   Pittsburgh,   Pennsylvania.     At  Allegheny,   Pennsylvania, 
on  the  11th  of  April,  1872,  Mr.  GraiT  wedded   Miss  Eleanor  M. 
Davis,  and  the  wife  of  his  youth  was  summoned  to  eternal  rest  in 
1895,  their  surviving  children  being  Henderson  D.,  Mary  L.,  John 
A.,  Edwin  A.,  Jr.,  and  Eleanor  M.    The  eldest  son  is  Secretary  and 
Treasurer  of  the   Columbia   Malting  Company  and   is    likewise   a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.     On  the  8th  of  February,  1899, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  GrafT  to  Mrs.  Josephine  M. 
Hewson,  and  the  one  surviving  child  of  this  union  is  Alan  Robert 
Graflf. 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  131 

George  S.  Green. — With  intimate  and  comprehensive  experi- 
ence in  connection  with  the  seed  business,  Mr.  Green  has  become  one 
of  the  prominent  and  influential  representatives  of  this  important 
line  of  commercial  and  industrial  enterprise,  as  indicated  by  the  fact 
that  he  is  President  of  the  Illinois  Seed  Company.  The  corporation 
of  which  he  is  thus  the  executive  head  has  developed  an  extensive 
and  substantial  business  and  is  one  of  the  leading  concerns  of  its 
kind  in  the  Middle  West.  In  connection  with  the  operations  of  the 
representative  company  with  which  he  is  thus  identified  Mr.  Green 
has  held  membership  in  and  been  closely  identified  with  the  afifairs 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  is  one  of  the  progressive  business  men  and 
loyal  citizens  of  Chicago,  rendering  most  appropriate  the  recognition 
accorded  him  in  this  publication.  George  Stilwell  Green  was  born 
in  the  city  of  Hannibal,  Missouri,  on  the  7th  of  October,  1863,  and 
is  a  son  of  George  R.  and  Laura  M.  (Stilwell)  Green.  After  making 
good  use  of  the  advantages  afforded  in  the  public  schools  of  his 
native  State,  Mr.  Green  initiated  his  association  with  business  affairs 
in  1880,  when  seventeen  years  of  age.  At  this  juncture  in  his  career 
he  entered  the  employ  of  D.  I.  Bushnell  &  Co.,  a  leading  firm  of  seed 
merchants  in  the  city  of  St.  Louis,  and  during  the  long  intervening 
years  he  has  continued  his  active  and  effective  association  with  the 
line  of  business  enterprise  in  which  he  thus  early  served  his  novitiate 
and  in  connection  with  which  he  has  gained  definite  success  and 
precedence.  After  a  service  of  five  years  he  was  admitted  to  part- 
nership in  the  business  of  D.  I.  Bushnell  &  Co.,  with  which  he 
thus  continued  his  identification  for  a  further  period  of  eight  years. 
In  1889  was  effected  the  organization  of  the  Illinois  Seed  Company, 
with  headquarters  in  the  city  of  Chicago,  and  Mr.  Green  is  one  of  the 
leading  stockholders  of  this  corporation,  his  initiative  and  adminis- 
trative ability  having  come  into  most  effective  play  during  the  period 
of  his  service  as  President  of  the  corporation,  a  position  of  which  he 
has  been  the  incumbent  since  July,  1901.  In  addition  to  holding 
membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  Mr.  Green  is  a  member  also  of 
the  Chicago  Association  of  Commerce,  and  he  is  fully  in  touch  with 
the  spirit  and  activities  of  each  of  these  important  and  progressive 
Chicago  organizations.  The  offices  of  the  Illinois  Seed  Company  are 
at  1521  Johnson  Street,  and  its  President  maintains  his  residence 
in  the  beautiful  surburban  city  of  Evanston.  In  the  year  1892 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Green  to  Miss  Marion  Crissey, 
of  East  Orange,  New  Jersey,  and  they  have  one  daughter — 
Gladys  Marion. 

George  S.  Greene. — In  the  city  of  Dayton,  Ohio,  a  prominent 
firm  engaged  in  the  handling  of  investment  securities  and  in  the 
commission  grain  trade  is  that  of  Brien,  Greene  &  Co.,  the  exceutive 
members  of  which  are  Bernis  Brien  and  George  S.  Greene.  The 
latter  has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chi- 
cago since  1914,  in  September  of  which  year  the  partnership  was 


132  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

formed.  The  constituent  members  of  the  firm  are  broad-gauged 
and  progressive  young  business  men  who  are  bringing  to  bear  the 
utmost  circumspection,  energy  and  rehability  in  the  conducting  and 
expanding  of  their  well-established  business,  and  it  is  pleasing  to 
give  to  Mr.  Greene  the  recognition  that  is  due  him  in  this  publica- 
tion by  reason  of  his  loyal  affiliation  with  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade.  The  business  in  which  he  is  a  principal  had  its  inception  in 
1902,  but  the  present  firm  was  formed  in  1914,  as  noted  above. 
George  Shaw  Greene  was  born  in  the  city  of  Buflfalo,  New  York, 
on  the  9th  of  April,  1884,  and  is  the  younger  of  the  two  children  of 
John  Bradley  Greene  and  Nancy  (Shaw)  Greene,  both  likewise 
natives  of  the  old  Empire  State.  The  father  was  a  lawyer  of  excep- 
tional ability  and  was  one  of  the  representative  members  of  the 
bar  at  the  time  of  his  death,  his  widow  still  surviving  him.  The 
educational  advantages  afforded  to  George  S.  Greene  in  the  period 
of  his  boyhood  and  youth  were  those  of  the  public  schools  and  his- 
toric old  Yale  University,  and  his  initial  business  experience  was 
gained  through  his  association  with  the  National  Cash  Register 
Company,  of  Dayton,  Ohio,  in  connection  with  which  great  indus- 
trial enterprise  he  gained  most  valuable  knowledge  of  practical  and 
fortifying  order.  He  continued  with  this  company  until  July,  1914, 
when  he  became  concerned  with  his  present  line  of  business,  his 
success  in  which  has  fully  justified  his  choice  of  vocation.  Mr. 
Greene  is  a  staunch  advocate  of  the  principles  of  the  Republican 
party,  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church, 
and  he  is  a  popular  member  of  the  Dayton  City  Club  and  the  Day- 
ton Country  Club.  Mr.  Greene  is  happily  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Daisy  Talbott,  a  daughter  of  Herrick  E.  Talbott,  of  Dayton,  and  the 
one  child  of  this  union  is  John  Bradley  Greene,  named  in  honor  of 
his  paternal  grandfather. 

Malcolm  E.  Greenleaf. — A  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade  since  1914,  in  which  year  he  became  one  of  the  organizers  and 
incorporators  of  the  Jacksonville  Grain  &  Commission  Company, 
Mr.  Greenleaf  is  prominently  concerned  with  grain  operations  in  the 
western  part  of  the  State  of  Illinois,  with  his  office  headquarters  in 
the  Ayers  Bank  Building  in  the  city  of  Jacksonville,  Morgan 
County,  and  he  is  President  of  the  company  above  mentioned,  the 
same  having  active  representation  not  only  on  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade,  but  also  the  St.  Louis  Merchants'  Exchange.  In  the  vil- 
lage of  Alexander,  Morgan  County,  Mr.  Greenleaf  likewise  controls 
a  substantial  grain  business,  besides  being  there  engaged  in  the 
lumber  business  also,  his  grain  elevator  at  Alexander  having  a 
capacity  of  60,000  bushels.  His  valued  coadjutor  in  the  Jacksonville 
Grain  &  Commission  Company  is  Charles  A.  Obermeyer,  who  has 
been  Secretary  and  Treasurer  of  the  corporation  during  the  entire 
period  of  its  operations  and  who  has  wielded  large  and  worthy 
influence   in   the   development   and    upbuilding   of   the   substantial 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  133 

enterprise.  Malcolm  E.  Greenleaf  was  born  at  Jacksonville,  Illinois, 
May  19,  1877,  and  it  is  specially  pleasing  to  note  that  he  has 
achieved  place  as  one  of  the  thoroughly  progressive  citizens  and 
popular  and  influential  business  men  of  his  native  city.  He  is  one 
of  the  seven  children  born  to  Edward  S.  and  Katie  B.  Greenleaf, 
and  his  father  was  for  many  years  one  of  the  well-known  and  suc- 
cessful grain  dealers  in  central  Illinois,  his  active  identification  with 
this  important  line  of  industrial  and  commercial  enterprise  having 
continued  until  his  death,  which  occurred,  at  Jacksonville,  on  the 
10th  of  January,  1911.  His  widow  still  maintains  her  home  in  this 
city.  The  public  schools  of  his  native  city  afforded  to  Malcolm  E. 
Greenleaf  excellent  educational  advantages  in  his  boyhood  and 
youth  and  after  having  profited  by  the  curriculum  of  the  high  school 
he  took  a  partial  course  in  Whipple  College.  He  early  gained  prac- 
tical experience  in  connection  with  his  father's  operations  as  a  buyer 
and  shipper  of  grain,  and  thus  he  had  excellent  basic  knowledge  of 
the  business  when,  in  1912,  he  became  one  of  the  interested  prin- 
cipals in  the  firm  which  two  years  later  was  incorporated  under  the 
present  title  of  the  Jacksonville  Grain  &  Commission  Company, 
the  business  of  which  he  has  directed  with  marked  discrimination 
and  success,  with  the  valued  co-operation  of  Mr.  Obermeyer,  who  is 
Secretary  and  Treasurer  of  the  company,  as  previously  noted.  He 
is  a  vital  and  public-spirited  citizen,  taking  deep  interest  in  all 
things  touching  the  wellbeing  of  his  home  city,  and  his  political 
allegiance  is  given  to  the  Republican  party.  He  was  reared  in  and 
holds  to  the  faith  of  the  Congregational  church,  and  his  wife  holds 
membership  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  In  a  fraternal  way 
he  maintains  affiliation  with  the  Jacksonville  Lodge  of  the  Benevo- 
lent and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  The  marriage  of  Mr.  Greenleaf 
to  Miss  Letha  Beerlip,  daughter  of  S.  G.  Beerlip,  of  Jacksonville, 
has  resulted  in  the  birth  of  one  child — Malcolm  E.,  Jr. 

William  D.  Gregory. — One  of  the  most  extensive  and  influen- 
tial concerns  engaged  in  the  grain  commission  trade  in  the  city  of 
Minneapolis  and  one  of  the  most  important  in  this  branch  of  com- 
mercial enterprise  in  the  Northwest  is  that  of  Gregory,  Jennison 
&  Co.,  the  Minneapolis  offices  of  which  are  in  the  Flour  Exchange 
Building,  a  branch  office  being  maintained  in  the  Board  of  Trade 
Building  in  the  city  of  Duluth.  Of  this  old  and  honored  grain  firm 
William  D.  Gregory  is  the  executive  head,  and  other  principals 
who  are  active  and  influential  also  in  the  control  of  the  management 
of  the  splendid  business  are  William  J.  Russell,  Edward 
H.  Gregory,  William  A.  Gregory,  Merton  W.  Sowle  and 
Carl  I.  Rollins.  Mr.  Sowle  is  a  representative  of  the 
firm  in  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  Mr. 
Rollins  is  cashier  of  the  concern,  Laurence  S.  Gregory,  a  son  of 
William  D.,  being  likewise  associated  with  the  business  in  an  active 
way.     William  Daniel  Gregory  has  proved  himself  one  of  the  ster- 


134  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

ling  figures  in  the  vigorous  commercial  activities  of  the  Minnesota 
metropolis,  has  wielded  large  and  benignant  influence,  both  as  a 
progressive  business  man  and  as  a  public-spirited  citizen,  and  it  is 
gratifying  to  accord  to  him  recognition  in  this  publication,  as  he 
represents  his  firm  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City 
of  Chicago.  From  an  authoritative  source  in  Minneapolis  is  drawn 
the  following  estimate,  which  is  clearly  worthy  of  reproduction  in 
this  connection :  '"Thirty-three  years  of  constructive  service  as 
grain  commission  specialists  has  placed  the  name  of  Gregory,  Jen- 
nison  &  Co.  uppermost  among  the  institutions  which  have  made 
Minneapolis  the  greatest  primary  grain  market  in  the  world.  It 
was  away  back  in  1884,  three  years  after  the  Minneapolis  Chamber 
of  Commerce  was  incorporated,  that  William  D.  Gregory  and  S.  S. 
Linton  organized  the  original  company  and  set  forth  to  do  their 
share  in  properly  placing  the  farmer  before  the  grain  buyers  of  the 
world.  The  names  of  these  two  pioneers  are  emblazoned  on  the 
escutcheon  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  as  well  as  on  those  of 
other  constructive  institutions  that  have  made  possible  the  metro- 
politan Minneapolis  of  the  present  day.  As  champions  of  the  cause 
of  the  producer,  they  have  built  up  a  clientele  of  patrons  that  ex- 
tends throughout  the  Northwest.  Farmers  have  for  years  recog- 
nized their  efforts  in  their  behalf.  Their  shipments  and  their  orders 
have  been  placed  in  the  hands  of  Gregory,  Jennison  &  Co.  Service 
has  won  their  confidence  and  their  supporting  patronage.  William 
D.  Gregory,  son  of  an  Ohio  physician,  from  boyhood  has  been  asso- 
ciated with  the  grain  and  milling  industry.  In  his  earlier  period  of 
experience  he  was  associated  with  George  W.  Reynolds  and  Fallis, 
Linton  &  Co.,  millers  and  grain  dealers  in  the  city  of  Toledo,  Ohio. 
When  he  joined  hands  with  the  late  S.  S.  Linton  in  the  commission 
business  in  Minneapolis,  in  1884,  the  city  was  given  an  institution 
that  today  stands  out  as  a  beacon  light  that  has  directed  people  and 
prosperity  to  its  gates.  When  the  company  built  the  Midway  ele- 
vator, which  had  a  capacity  of  about  1,500,000  bushels,  it  was  con- 
sidered a  master  stroke  in  business  enterprise.  Yet  there  were 
greater  things  in  store.  When  the  Powers  Elevator  Company  was 
organized,  Mr.  Gregory  was  one  of  the  guiding  heads.  The  com- 
pany controls  more  than  sixty  elevators  and  twenty-five  lumber 
yards  in  the  West.  Then  there  are  the  Duluth  Universal  Milling 
Company,  the  Commander  Milling  Company  and  a  score  of  similar 
organizations  in  which  Mr.  Gregory  is  interested.  Precepts  fol- 
lowed by  these  commercial  captains  in  early  years  are  today  axioms 
in  the  offices  of  Gregory,  Jennison  &  Co.  The  same  straightforward 
dealing,  the  same  close  study  of  conditions,  and  the  identical 
methods  that  gained  the  confidence  of  patrons  in  the  pioneer  days 
assure  continued  success.  Under  the  leadership  of  William  D.  and 
Edward  H.  Gregory,  William  J.  Russell  and  William  A.  Gregory, 
the  company  maintains  on  intrinsic  merit  its  definite  priority.    Few 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  135 

grain  specialists  are  better  known  than  William  J.  Russell,  whose 
expert  knowledge  of  wheat  values  is  unexcelled,  and  he  has  charge 
of  the  buying  for  the  elevators  and  various  mills  with  which  the 
firm  is  connected.  With  his  energy  and  broad  experience  brought 
to  bear,  a  large  shipping  business  has  been  developed,  involving 
alliance  with  many  eastern  millers  for  whom  orders  are  executed 
solely  on  his  judgment.  Associated  with  and  a  member  of  the 
firm  is  William  A.  Gregory,  whose  knowledge  of  crop  conditions 
and  market  fluctuations  has  made  and  saved  much  for  the  clients 
of  the  firm.  Every  man  in  the  firm  is  a  specialist.  He  has  been 
trained  under  Gregory-Jennison  principles  and  has  been  brought  up 
in  the  Gregory-Jennison  way  of  doing  things.  This  compact  body 
of  experts  presents  a  united  front  and  the  fine  spirit  of  co-operation 
has  been  a  dominant  force  in  accomplishing  results.  Whether  it 
be  in  the  pit,  on  the  cash  trading  floor,  in  the  offices,  in  financial 
institutions,  in  elevator  companies,  the  Civic  &  Commerce  Associa- 
tion, the  Chamber  of  Commerce  or  elsewhere,  heads  of  Gregory, 
Jennison  &  Co.  stand  for  the  welfare  of  their  clients  and  for  a  bigger, 
better  Minneapolis."  William  Daniel  Gregory,  the  honored  head 
and  one  of  the  founders  of  the  representative  grain  concern  of 
Gregory,  Jennison  &  Co.,  was  born  in  Ohio  and  is  a  son  of  Dr. 
Daniel  L.  and  Anna  P.  (Clark)  Gregory,  who  were  natives  of  Mas- 
sachusetts and  representatives  of  sterling  colonial  families  of  New 
England.  Mr.  Gregory  is  a  resident  of  Minneapolis  and  has  been 
most  liberal  and  progressive  as  a  citizen,  even  as  he  has  proved 
himself  one  of  the  strong  and  resourceful  business  men  of  the  North- 
west, a  veritable  captain  of  industry.  He  has  identified  himself 
most  fully  with  community  interests,  both  civic  and  material,  and 
his  extensive  and  important  interests  are  indicated  when  it  is 
stated  that  he  is  President  of  the  Underway  Elevator  Company, 
the  Powers  Elevator  Company,  the  State  Elevator  Company,  the 
Empire  Elevator  Company,  the  Diamond  Elevator  Company,  and 
the  Commander  Elevator  Company,  as  well  as  the  Interstate  Milling 
Company  of  Duluth,  besides  being  Secretary  of  the  Commercial 
Milling  Company.  He  has  long  been  one  of  the  valued  and  influen- 
tial members  of  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce,  of  which 
he  has  served  as  a  Director ;  he  is  identified  with  the  Milwaukee 
Grain  Exchange,  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade. 
The  political  allegiance  of  Mr.  Gregory  is  given  to  the  Republican 
party,  and  he  has  been  a  close  student  of  governmental  and  eco- 
nomic affairs.  He  holds  membership  in  the  Minnesota  Club,  the 
Interlachen  Country  Club,  the  Minnetonka  Club,  the  Lafayette 
Club  and  the  Minneapolis  Automobile  Club.  Both  he  and  his  wife 
hold  membership  in  the  Park  Avenue  Congregational  church  in 
Minneapolis,  the  family  home  being  at  2733  Park  avenue,  and  the 
attractive  country  or  summer  home  at  Minikahda  Beach.  Mr. 
Gregory  was  married  to  Miss  Nellie  Sowle. 


136  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

William  L.  Gregson. — During  the  entire  period  of  his  active 
business  career  Mr.  Gregson  has  been  closely  connected  with  the 
packing  and  provision  industry,  and  he  is  now  one  of  the  prominent 
and  influential  representatives  of  this  important  line  of  enterprise 
in  the  city  that  has  been  the  principal  stage  of  his  activities  from 
his  youth  and  in  which  he  has  so  measured  up  to  the  best  standards 
of  opportunity  as  to  gain  success  that  is  worthy  of  his  name  and 
that  places  him  in  strong  vantage-place  as  one  of  the  influential 
business  men  and  progressive  citizens  of  the  western  metropolis. 
His  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  had  its  inception  about 
the  year  1889,  and  he  has  been  fully  in  sympathy  with  its  high 
code  of  commercial  ethics,  as  well  as  appreciative  of  its  important 
and  carefully  controlled  functions.  He  has  been  a  popular  and 
influential  figure  in  the  ordering  of  the  aflfairs  of  the  Board  of  Trade, 
of  which  he  served  six  years  as  a  Director,  besides  having  held  for 
one  year  the  office  of  Second  Vice-President  and  for  an  equal 
period  the  position  of  First  Vice-President.  He  is  now  the  execu- 
tive head  of  the  well  known  grain  and  provision  house  of  W.  L. 
Gregson  &  Co.,  with  offices  at  607  Insurance  Exchange  Building. 
William  Linaker  Gregson  was  born  at  Bridge  Farm,  Crossens, 
Southport,  in  Lancashire,  England,  on  the  tenth  of  September,  1866, 
and  is  a  son  of  William  and  Margaret  (Linaker)  Gregson.  His 
early  education  was  gained  in  the  village  school  at  Crossens,  and 
this  discipline  was  supplemented  effectively  by  a  course  of  higher 
academic  study  in  a  collegiate  school  at  Southport.  Mr.  Gregson 
came  to  the  United  States  in  1882  as  a  youth  of  about  sixteen  years, 
and  in  the  same  year  he  became  associated  with  the  Chicago  firm 
of  H.  Botsford  &  Co.,  which  was  then  one  of  prominence  in  the 
local  field  of  meat-packing  operations.  With  this  firm  he  gained 
his  initial  experience  in  connection  with  the  packing  and  provision 
trade,  and  he  remained  with  the  concern  until  1890,  which  year  he 
passed  in  the  city  of  Omaha  as  an  attache  of  the  local  branch  of 
the  great  packing  house  of  Swift  &  Co.  In  1893  he  became  assistant 
secretary  of  the  Chicago  Packing  &  Provision  Co.,  of  which  he 
later  became  vice-president.  He  severed  this  connection  to'  assume 
the  office  of  president  of  the  International  Packing  Company,  but 
he  subsequently  resumed  his  connection  with  the  Chicago  Packing 
&  Provision  Co.,  of  which  he  became  president.  In  this  executive 
capacity  he  continued  his  efifective  services  until  1900,  when  he 
established  the  commission  firm  of  W.  L.  Gregson  &  Co.  Soon 
afterward,  however,  he  organized  the  Morton-Gregson  Company, 
which  engaged  in  the  packing  business,  and  of  which  he  continued 
president  until  1907,  when  he  became  vice-president  of  the  corpo- 
ration known  as  W.  P.  Anderson  &  Co.,  engaged  in  the  grain  and 
provision  commission  trade.  This  alliance  was  terminated  by  him 
in  1913,  since  which  time  he  has  continued  as  the  executive  head  of 
the  representative  commission  firm  of  W.  L.  Gregson  &  Co.,  which 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  137 

controls  a  large  and  substantial  business  in  the  commission  trade  in 
grain  and  provisions.  Mr.  Gregson  maintains  his  residence  in  the 
fine  suburban  district  of  Morgan  Park,  where  he  is  a  loyal  and  influ- 
ential factor  in  civic  aflEairs  and  where  he  has  given  effective  service 
as  a  member  of  the  municipal  board  of  trustees  and  the  Calumet 
Park  Commission.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Union  League  Club  of 
Chicago.  On  the  sixth  of  August,  1889,  was  solemnized  the  mar- 
riage of  Mr.  Gregson  to  Miss  Fannie  Beveridge,  daughter  of  the 
late  Peter  H.  Beveridge,  of  Chicago,  and  the  three  children  of  this 
union  are  Margaret,  William  Fuller  and  Winifred. 

Joseph  P.  Griffin. — In  all  the  great  crises  which  have  confronted 
the  Board  of  Trade  in  the  many  and  varied  years  of  its  history,  the 
man,  or  the  men,  have  fortunately  been  found  capable  and  strong 
to  meet  the  emergency.  While  few,  if  any,  could  have  foreseen,  in 
1915,  that  the  President  of  the  Board  then  to  be  elected  was  to  be 
the  "War  President"  in  the  greatest  war  the  world  has  known,  no 
wiser  choice  could  have  been  made  than  when  the  virile  young  man, 
Joseph  P.  Griffin,  was  elected.  His  reputation  was  not  that  of  a 
plunger  or  speculator,  but  that  of  a  large  and  substantial  dealer  in 
grain,  peculiarly  fitting  him  to  aid  in  the  solution  of  the  present 
difficult  problem  of  feeding  the  people  of  America,  her  soldiers  in  the 
field  and  the  peoples  of  our  warring  Allies,  without  unnecessary 
interruption  of  trade  and  without  injustice  to  the  producer.  The 
nature  of  his  business  connection  with  the  Board  is  such,  also,  as  to 
render  pointless  what  of  prejudice  there  may  exist  among  those 
unacquainted  with,  and  thus  unappreciative  of,  the  great  function  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  as  the  open  market  place  of  all  the  world.  That 
Mr.  Grifiin  has  also  been  able  to  bring  to  the  unprecedented  exac- 
tions of  his  task  as  leader  of  the  Association  unbounded  and  tireless 
energy  exalted  patriotism,  quick  and  decisive  action  and  excellent 
judgment  based  on  wide  experience,  are  further  factors  in  inspiring 
confidence  that  the  Board  of  Trade  will  emerge  from  the  ordeal  of 
war  with  its  splendid  record  during  the  Civil  War  repeated,  with  its 
future  assured  and  with  a  still  stronger  place  in  the  esteem  of  the 
thoughtful  business  men  of  the  Nation.  Joseph  P.  Griffin  is  the 
youngest  man  who  has  ever  been  honored  by  his  fellow  members 
with  the  important  office  of  President  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  He 
was  born  in  Chicago,  March  7th,  1878,  and  he  is,  therefore,  still 
under  forty  years  of  age.  He  is  the  son  of  Charles  and  Mary  (Gal- 
oran)  Griffin,  his  father  having  been  born  in  the  state  of  New  York 
and  his  mother  in  the  state  of  Connecticut,  although  both  boast 
that  the  blood  of  the  Emerald  Isle  flows  through  their  veins.  The 
public  schools  did  not  see  much  of  the  young  Chicago  lad,  for  at 
the  age  of  thirteen  he  began  earning  his  own  way  in  the  world  as 
a  boy  in  the  employ  of  the  American  Glucose  Company  of  which 
he  was  afterwards  President.  Anyone  talking  with  Mr.  Griffin  as 
he  is  to-day,  an  educated,  polished,  and  splendidly  informed  man, 


138  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

will  realize,  however,  that  his  education  did  not  end  with  his  school 
days,  and  one  can  but  vision  the  many  hours  of  reading  and  study 
which  the  tired  youth  must  have  done  after  the  hard  day's  work 
was  finished  in  order  to  equip  himself  for  the  important  position 
which  he  holds  in  the  business  world.  The  story  of  his  victory  in 
spite  of  many  obstacles,  by  the  sheer  force  of  his  indomitable  will, 
his  unflagging  industry  and  his  keen  intellect,  is  an  inspiration  as 
to  the  possibilities  of  achievement  in  this  great  republic  for  the  man 
who  will  make  the  very  most  of  every  opportunity.  Corporations 
may  be  soulless,  but  they  are  always  on  the  lookout  to  utilize  ex- 
ceptional ability  and  to  place  added  responsibility  upon  shoulders 
that  prove  themselves  capable  of  bearing  the  burden.  Thus  it  was 
that  Mr.  Griffin  found  advancement  until  he  was  entrusted  with 
the  corn  buying  for  the  great  institution  with  which  he  was  con- 
nected, the  transactions  for  which  he  was  responsible  amounting  to 
25.000,000  to  30,000.000  bushels  a  year.  He  became  President  of  the 
American  Glucose  Company,  Secretary  and  Treasurer  of  the  Na- 
tional Starch  Company,  and  Director  of  the  Corn  Products  Com- 
pany when  he  was  little  more  than  thirty  years  of  age,  and  in  1910, 
he  severed  his  active  connection  with  these  concerns  and  established 
the  grain  commission  firm  known  as  J.  P.  Griffin  and  Company, 
which  since  that  time  has  had  an  unbroken  record  of  success,  based 
largely  upon  the  confidence  inspired  among  his  clients  by  his  spot- 
less business  career,  his  diligence  in  caring  for  their  interests  and 
his  acknowledged  ability  as  a  grain  expert.  Members  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  were  quick  to  recognize  his  worth  as  an  executive  and  he 
was  first  nominated,  by  petition,  as  a  candidate  for  Director  in  1907, 
and  elected  by  a  large  majority.  He  gave  to  this  position  the  same 
energy  and  ability  he  had  shown  in  his  private  business  and  it  was 
but  logical  that  he  should,  in  1914,  be  elected  to  the  Vice-Presidency 
and,  in  1916,  that,  as  a  leader  of  the  cash  grain  men,  he  should  have 
been  elected  to  the  Presidency,  after  one  of  the  most  exciting  elec- 
tions the  Board  has  ever  known.  His  opponent  at  this  time  was 
no  less  a  man  than  J.  A.  Patten,  one  of  the  most  potent  factors  in 
the  Chicago  markets  during  the  20th  century.  It  is  characteristic 
of  Mr.  Griffin  that  when  this  contest  was  ended  and  he  assumed  the 
reins  of  government,  it  was  with  him  a  closed  incident,  and  that 
he  conducted  the  affairs  of  his  office  with  the  utmost  fairness  and 
impartiality,  is  evidenced  by  his  unanimous  re-election  in  1917.  Mr. 
Griffin  was  an  earnest  advocate  of  the  erection  of  a  new  building 
for  the  Board  of  Trade  and  took  steps  to  promote  this  project,  which 
has,  however,  been  postponed  for  the  present  on  account  of  the  ex- 
treme cost  of  building  operations.  He  also  took  active  part  in  secur- 
ing the  repeal  of  the  Stamp  Tax  of  1914,  which  imposed  excessive 
burdens  upon  transactions  in  grain  and  he  has  been  energetic  in 
assisting  to  devise  plans  for  a  new  and  better  clearing  house  system. 
During  the  early  months  of  1917,  Mr.  Griffin  did  more  than  any  one 


a^^^ 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  139 

other  man  to  impress  upon  the  people  the  vital  importance  of  a  bet- 
ter organization  of  our  transportation  system  that  commerce  might 
have  uninterrupted  flow,  and  his  repeated  efforts  were  of  greatest 
value  in  securing  relief  from  the  great  rail  blockade  which  existed. 
During  the  present  strenuous  days,  when  entirely  new  problems 
confront  the  Nation,  he  has  acted  with  firmness  and  decision,  and 
with  unswerving  patriotism  and  loyalty  both  to  America  and  to 
the  interests  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  The  keynote  of  Mr.  Griffin's 
character  is  that  of  almost  electric  energy,  combined  with  quick 
decision  and  sound  judgment.  He  is  fond  of  out-door  sports  and 
is  a  member  of  the  Westmoreland  Golf  Club  and  the  Chicago  Ath- 
letic Association,  but  since  becoming  President  of  the  Board  his 
duties  have  been  so  pressing  that  he  has  had  no  time  for  relaxation 
or  recreation.  The  exactions  of  business  have  not  marred  his  genial 
and  kindly  nature,  nor  disturbed  the  unfailing  courtesy  with  which 
he  greets  all  with  whom  he  comes  in  contact.  In  his  home  life  Mr. 
Grififin  has  been  most  happy,  as  in  business  he  has  been  most  suc- 
cessful. His  marriage  to  Miss  Florence  Bell  took  place  November 
12,  1902,  and  five  children  grace  their  home  :  Hollis,  Joseph,  William, 
Robert  and  Florence.  Politically  Mr.  Griffin  is  afifiliated  with  the 
Republican  party,  but  he  is  a  man  who  exercises  his  individual  judg- 
ment upon  both  men  and  issues.  Not  alone  is  the  Board  of  Trade 
to  be  congratulated  that  its  interests  at  this  time  are  in  such  wise  and 
capable  hands,  but  the  people  of  the  country  are  to  be  congratulated 
that  the  head  of  this  great  institution  has  broad  and  patriotic  views, 
and  that  nothing  which  he  may  do  will  conflict  with  the  high  purpose 
of  America  or  with  the  prosperity  and  welfare  of  its  people. 

Thomas  A.  Grier. — At  this  juncture  attention  is  directed  to  one 
of  the  well  known  and  popular  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
who  has  been  for  many  years  an  influential  figure  in  connection 
with  the  grain  trade  in  central  Illinois  and  who  is  now  president 
of  T.  A.  Grier  &  Co.,  Inc.,  of  Peoria,  this  concern  having  been 
incorporated  under  the  Illinois  laws  in  October,  1916,  as  successor 
of  the  former  firm  of  T.  A.  Grier  &  Co.  Associated  with  Mr.  Grier 
in  the  new  organization  of  T.  A.  Grier  &  Co.,  Inc.,  are  E.  V.  Maltby, 
Vice-President ;  Samuel  Thomas,  Treasurer ;  J.  A.  Waring,  Secre- 
tary. Mr.  Grier  has  been  closely  and  successfully  identified  with 
the  grain  trade  in  Illinois  for  more  than  thirty  years,  his  original 
activities  having  been  with  the  Union  Elevator  Company,  at  Peoria, 
succeeded  in  1897  by  the  Burlington  Elevator  Company,  of  which 
he  became  President  in  1897.  He  is  still  the  chief  executive  officer 
of  this  company,  and  has  been  one  of  the  leaders  in  the  affairs  of 
the  Peoria  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  has  served  as  President 
in  1907.  His  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago  is  of  long  standing,  and  he  is  well  known  to  its  leading 
resident  members.  Mr.  Grier's  operations  in  the  handling  of  grain 
have  long  been  of  broad  scope  and  importance,  and  he  has  proved 


140  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

himself  a  specially  progressive  and  resourceful  business  man,  his 
activities  having  included  influential  association  with  all  grain 
enterprises  in  his  home  city  of  Peoria.  A  member  of  a  family  of 
eleven  children,  Mr.  Grier  was  born  in  Wilkes-Barre,  Pennsylvania, 
on  the  first  of  March,  1850,  the  family  removal  to  Illinois  having 
occurred  in  the  following  year,  so  that  he  was  reared  in  the  West 
and  has  imbibed  most  fully  of  its  progressive  spirit,  as  shown  by 
his  vigor  and  prominent  status  as  a  veritable  captain  of  industry. 
He  is  a  son  of  John  C.  and  Elizabeth  (Perkins)  Grier,  both  likewise 
natives  of  the  old  Keystone  state,  and  the  father  became  a  pioneer 
in  the  grain  and  stock  commission  business  in  Illinois,  the  family 
home  having  been  established  at  Peoria,  this  state,  in  1851,  as 
previously  intimated.  With  the  lines  of  enterprise  noted  John  C. 
Grier  continued  his  active  alliance  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
in  1891.  Two  other  sons  became  prominent  representatives  of  the 
grain  business  at  Peoria — General  David  P.,  and  Robert  C.  Grier. 
Thomas  A.  Grier  was  afforded  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools, 
and  as  a  youth  of  sixteen  years  he  initiated  his  business  experience 
with  the  banking  business  by  taking  a  position  in  the  employ  of 
the  Mechanics  National  Bank  of  Peoria,  leaving  this  position  in 
1872  to  enter  the  elevator  and  grain  business.  His  ability  and  defi- 
nite achievement  led  to  his  being  made  President  of  the  Burlington 
Elevator  Company  in  1897.  He  is  one  of  the  most  progressive 
citizens  and  business  men  of  Peoria,  is  a  stalwart  in  the  ranks  of 
the  Republican  party,  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Pres- 
byterian church,  and  he  is  one  of  the  leading  members  of  the  Peoria 
Country  Club  and  Creve  Coeur  Club,  both  of  which  he  has  served 
as  President.  In  1876  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Grier 
to  Miss  Ella  Clarke,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Samuel  S.  Clarke,  of 
Peoria,  Illinois,  and  of  the  children  of  this  union  four  are  living, 
namely:  Thomas  P.  Grier,  Samuel  Clarke  Grier,  Mrs.  Herbert 
B.  Jamison,  Mrs.  Wm.  J.  Jack. 

Gunder  B.  Gunderson. — That  important  corporation,  the  Min- 
nesota Grain  Company,  of  Minneapolis,  is  represented  in  member- 
ship on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  by  its  president,  whose  name 
begins  this  review  and  who  is  to  be  consistently  noted  as  one  of 
the  leading  exponents  of  the  grain  commission  business  in  the 
Northwest.  He  has  been  actively  identified  with  this  important 
line  of  commercial  and  industrial  enterprise  for  nearly  thirty  years, 
has  been  a  member  of  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce 
since  1892,  and  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  since 
1894,  his  high  standing  in  his  chosen  field  of  endeavor  specially 
entitling  him  to  recognition  in  this  history.  He  has  extended  his 
active  association  with  the  commercial  phases  of  the  grain  business 
by  his  alliance  with  the  Duluth  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  has 
been  a  member  since  1892.  The  Minneapolis  offices  of  the  Min- 
nesota Grain  Company  are  at  451-2  Chamber  of  Commerce  Building, 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  141 

and  a  branch  office  is  maintained  at  301  in  the  Board  of  Trade 
Building  in  the  city  of  Duluth.  C.  M.  Reese  is  Vice-President  of 
the  company,  and  Herbert  J.  Gunderson,  son  of  the  President,  is 
its  Secretary,  two  other  sons,  Walter  E.  and  Charles  F.,  likewise 
being  actively  associated  with  the  business,  and  Herbert  J.  being 
an  active  and  popular  member  of  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of 
Commerce.  Gunder  B.  Gunderson,  a  representative  of  that  fine 
Scandinavian  element  that  has  exercised  most  potent  influence 
in  the  civic  and  industrial  development  of  the  great  Northwest, 
was  born  on  the  twenty-fourth  of  December,  1861,  and  is  a  son 
of  Theodore  and  Kyisten  (Ingebresto)  Gunderson,  both  natives 
of  Norway  and  both  sterling  pioneers  of  Minnesota,  where  the 
father  became  a  prosperous  farmer  and  honored  citizen.  Gunder 
B.  Gunderson  was  reared  to  the  sturdy  discipline  of  the  pioneer 
farm  and  profited  fully  by  the  advantages  afforded  in  the  public 
schools  of  the  locality  and  period.  In  1884,  at  the  age  of  twenty- 
three  years,  he  became  associated  with  the  flour-milling  business, 
with  which  he  continued  his  identification  until  1888,  since  which 
year  he  has  continued  to  be  actively  engaged  in  the  grain  trade, 
of  which  he  has  become  a  leading  exponent  in  Minneapolis.  He 
was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Minnesota  Grain  Company,  for- 
merly held  the  office  of  Secretary  and  Treasurer  of  the  same,  and 
is  now  its  President.  Mr.  Gunderson  gives  his  political  allegiance 
to  the  Republican  party,  he  and  his  family  are  communicants  of 
the  Lutheran  church,  and  his  attractive  home  in  Minneapolis  is 
at  5146  Lyndale  avenue.  Mr.  Gunderson  was  married  to  Miss 
Grace  Engle,  a  daughter  of  Niles  Engle,  and  three  of  the  sons 
of  this  union  are  connected  with  the  Minnesota  Grain  Company, 
as  previously  noted. 

G.  Willard  Hales. — Various  states  of  the  Union  have  contrib- 
uted materially  and  effectively  to  the  personnel  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  to  the  old  Buckeye  State  is  this 
organization  indebted  for  the  progressive  and  popular  member 
whose  name  appears  above.  Mr.  Hales  has  practical  reinforcement 
for  the  labors  and  responsibilities  involved  in  the  grain  trade,  as 
in  his  youth  he  had  close  fellowship  with  the  basic  industry  of 
agriculture,  and  he  has  gained  excellent  reputation  for  his  discrimi- 
nation, facility  and  well  ordered  conservatism  as  a  buyer  of  barley, 
corn,  wheat  and  oats,  his  care  and  discernment  keeping  him  at  all 
times  in  full  touch  with  the  trend  of  the  market  in  connection 
with  each  of  these  lines  of  produce.  Mr.  Hales  was  born  on  a 
farm  in  Henrietta  Township,  Lorain  County,  Ohio,  and  the  date 
of  his  nativity  was  December  18,  1874.  He  is  a  son  of  George  E. 
and  Lina  B.  (Rosa)  Hales,  and  his  father  was  long  a  successful 
exponent  of  agricultural  industry  in  the  Buckeye  State.  Mr.  Hales 
was  reared  to  the  sturdy  and  invigorating  discipline  of  the  home 
farm  and  duly  availed  himself  of  the  advantages  of  the  local  schools, 


142  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

after  which  he  pursued  a  higher  course  of  study  in  the  academy 
connected  with  Oberlin  College,  at  Oberlin,  Ohio.  He  put  his 
scholastic  attainments  to  practical  test  by  entering  the  pedagogic 
profession,  during  his  affiliation  with  which  he  proved  a  successful 
and  popular  teacher  in  the  rural  schools  of  his  native  state.  His 
experience  in  connection  with  practical  agricultural  enterprises 
was  fortified  later  by  his  activities  as  a  flour  miller,  and  in  1900  he 
established  his  permanent  residence  in  Chicago,  where  he  is  now 
president  of  the  representative  grain  business  conducted  by  the 
Hales  &  Edwards  Company,  which  is  duly  incorporated  under  the 
laws  of  the  state  and  which  controls  a  substantial  and  well  ordered 
business.  He  served  two  years  as  a  member  of  the  arbitration 
committee  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  Mr.  Hales  gives  his  allegiance 
to  the  Republican  party  and  his  civic  loyalty  is  in  consonance  with 
his  status  as  a  scion  of  sterling  old  colonial  stock  in  the  great 
American  republic.  He  is  an  appreciative  member  of  the  Society 
of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution,  holds  membership  in 
the  Hamilton  Club  of  Chicago  and  in  the  Glen  Oak  Country  Club. 
He  maintains  his  home  in  the  fine  suburban  city  of  Oak  Park, 
and  was  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  that  municipality 
in  1916.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  First  Congre- 
gational Church  of  Oak  Park.  July  30,  1902,  recorded  the  marriage 
of  Mr.  Hales  to  Miss  Carrie  Parker  Merchant,  and  they  have  three 
children:     Burton  W.,  William  M.  and  Caroline. 

Frank  W.  Hammer. — A  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade  since  1910,  Mr.  Hammer  has  not  found  it  necessary  to  wander 
afield  from  his  native  city  of  Polo,  Ogle  County,  Illinois,  to  establish 
and  develop  a  prosperous  general  grain  and  commission  business. 
It  is  specially  worthy  of  note  that  his  father  long  held  prestige  as 
one  of  the  successful  buyers  and  shippers  of  grain  in  northern 
Illinois,  his  association  with  this  basic  line  of  commercial  and  indus- 
trial enterprise  having  continued  until  1890,  when  he  retired.  He 
operated  several  grain  elevators  and  continued  his  residence  at 
Polo  until  his  death,  in  1910,  no  citizen  having  had  more  secure 
place  in  popular  confidence  and  esteem,  and  his  business  career 
having  been  marked  by  worthy  achievement.  Frank  W.  Hammer 
was  born  at  Polo  on  the  twenty-second  of  March,  1873,  and  is  a  son 
of  Benjamin  and  Narcissa  (Betennez)  Hammer,  who  were  parents 
of  nine  children.  He  whose  name  initiates  this  review  is  indebted 
to  the  public  schools  of  Polo  for  his  early  educational  discipline, 
and  as  a  youth  he  learned  telegraphy.  For  a  time  he  was  employed 
as  a  telegraph  operator  in  connection  with  the  grain  brokerage 
business  and  later  he  gave  efficient  service  for  the  Chicago,  Bur- 
lington &  Quincy  Railroad,  until  he  established  his  present  business 
enterprise  in  1910.  He  had  previously  been  identified  with  the  grain 
brokerage  business  at  Polo,  his  activities  in  this  line  having  been 
initiated   in    1903   and   having   continued   until   he   engaged    inde- 


fe:?^^^^^^^ 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  143 

pendently  in  his  present  business,  in  which  he  has  met  with 
unequivocal  success  and  has  well  upheld  the  honors  of  the  family 
name.  In  connection  with  his  business  he  is  a  correspondent  of 
the  well  known  Chicago  brokerage  firm  of  Logan  &  Bryan.  He 
takes  a  lively  interest  in  all  things  pertaining  to  the  civic  and 
material  welfare  of  his  native  city,  is  a  Republican  in  politics,  and 
he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Lutheran  church.  In  a 
fraternal  way  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows.  Mr.  Hammer  wedded  Miss  Flora  Smith,  a  daughter  of 
William  T.   Smith,  of  Whiteside  County. 

William  W.  Hampe. — It  has  been  within  the  ambition  and 
individual  ability  of  Mr.  Hampe  to  gain  distinctive  success  and 
prominence  in  connection  with  the  export  trade  in  provisions,  and 
in  this  important  domain  of  commercial  enterprise  he  is  a  member 
of  the  well  known  Chicago  firm  of  Paul  Tietgens  &  Co.,  which 
succeeded  to  the  business  of  Martin  M.  Schultz  &  Co.,  of  which 
latter  firm  Mr.  Hampe  had  been  one  of  the  interested  principals. 
He  whose  name  initiates  this  review  has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago 
since  1883,  and  his  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  dates  from 
January  15,  1896.  In  his  specific  field  of  enterprise  he  is  one  of 
its  influential  representatives  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  his  suc- 
cess in  the  provision  business  has  its  basis  on  long  and  varied 
experience  of  most  intimate  and  practical  order,  his  initial  associ- 
ation with  this  line  of  industrial  and  commercial  activity  having 
been  formed  in  his  native  land.  He  is  one  of  the  wide-awake, 
resourceful  and  progressive  business  men  of  the  younger  genera- 
tion on  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  is  clearly  entitled  to  recognition  in 
this  publication.  Mr.  Hampe  was  born  in  Clausthal,  Germany,  on 
the  third  of  July,  1876,  and  in  his  arrival  thus  anticipated  by  only 
one  day  the  centennial  of  the  independence  of  the  nation  in  which 
he  was  destined  to  achieve  marked  success  and  his  own  share  of 
independence  and  prosperity.  He  is  a  son  of  Adolph  and  Alvine 
Hampe,  gained  his  early  education  in  the  excellent  schools  of  Chi- 
cago, and  was  three  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the  family  immi- 
gration to  the  United  States,  the  home  being  established  at  Chicago. 
Mr.  Hampe  became  associated  with  the  provision  trade  when  a 
mere  lad,  and  has  advanced  through  his  own  ability  and  determined 
ambition  and  surety  of  purpose  from  the  position  of  messenger 
boy  to  that  of  a  leader  in  connection  with  the  commission  and 
export  trade  of  Chicago,  with  an  impregnable  vantage  place  on 
the  floor  of  the  Board  of  Trade  as  a  thoroughly  informed  captain 
of  industry  and  an  expert  authority  on  lard,  oils  and  tallow,  to 
which  commodities  his  firm  gives  special  attention  in  its  substantial 
export  business,  which  is  constantly  expanding  in  scope  and  impor- 
tance. As  a  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen  Mr.  Hampe  gives 
his  political  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  and  in  a  social  way 
he  holds  membership  in  the   Chicago  Automobile   Club  and   the 


144  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Illinois  Athletic  Club.  On  the  eighteenth  of  May,  1898,  was  solem- 
nized the  marriage  of  Mr.  Hampe  to  Miss  Ida  Stauch,  of  Chicago. 
They  have  no  children. 

Colonel  John  L.  Hancock. — There  is,  in  the  intensified  energy  of 
the  business  man,  fighting  the  everyday  battle  of  life,  but  little  to 
attract  the  attention  of  the  idle  observer;  but  to  the  mind  fully 
awake  to  the  reality  and  true  meaning  of  human  existence  there 
are  noble  and  immortal  lessons  in  the  story  of  the  life  of  the  man 
who,  without  other  means  than  a  strong  heart  and  clear  head, 
conquers  adversity,  and  who,  toiling  on  through  the  years  of  an 
arduous  career,  closes  the  evening  of  his  life  with  an  honorable 
competence  and  rich  in  the  respect  and  esteem  of  his  fellow  men. 
Such  men  rise  into  prominence  and  become  objects  of  high  con- 
sideration in  public  estimation  only  through  the  development  of 
the  noblest  attributes  of  manhood,  for  the  accidents  of  birth  and 
fortune,  and  the  adventitious  aids  of  chance  and  circumstance, 
can  do  little  to  give  them  enduring  place  in  history.  The  record 
of  the  lives  of  successful  men  who  influence  and  mold  events  is 
always  interesting  and  instructive,  and  becomes  more  so  when 
such  lives  present,  in  combined  view,  the  elements  of  material  suc- 
cess harmoniously  blended  with  completeness  of  moral  attribute 
and  the  attractions  of  unblemished  reputation.  Such  characters 
stand  out  as  the  proof  of  human  progress — the  illustrations  of 
human  dignity  and  worth.  The  record  of  the  life  of  Colonel  Han- 
cock finds  easy  and  graceful  place  in  a  history  of  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade,  with  which  he  was  so  long  and  prominently  identified. 
It  stands  out  pre-eminent  among  the  truly  great  men  of  his  time 
as  the  story  of  a  noble  character  whose  force,  whose  sterling  integ- 
rity, whose  fortitude  amid  deep  discouragements,  whose  good 
judgment  in  the  government  of  complicated  affairs,  whose  control 
of  agencies  and  circumstances,  and  whose  signal  success  in  bring- 
ing to  happy  fruition  great  undertakings,  both  commercial  and 
for  the  public  welfare,  contributed  in  marked  degree  not  only  to 
the  development  and  growth  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  but  also  to 
the  welfare  of  the  community  in  which  he  lived.  John  L.  Hancock 
was  born  in  the  town  of  Buxton,  Maine,  March  16,  1812,  a  descend- 
ant from  Colonial  stock  whose  family  name  is  synonymous  with  our 
national  independence  and  numbers  among  its  members  many  of 
the  patriots  of  1776,  including  the  American  statesman,  John  Han- 
cock, President  of  the  Provincial  Congress  in  1774,  President  of 
the  General  Congress  from  1775  to  1777,  and  the  first  of  the  signers 
of  the  Declaration  of  Independence.  The  immediate  subject  of 
this  review  spent  his  boyhood  days  in  his  native  village  and  at 
Hiram,  Maine,  whither  the  family  had  removed  when  he  was  a 
lad  of  fourteen,  amidst  such  surroundings  and  environments  as 
were  common  to  the  youth  of  that  period.  He  was  endowed  by 
nature  with  a  powerful  frame,  vigorous  intellect,  and  a  spirit  of 


>-^^^ 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  145 

courage  and  enterprise  that  prompted  him  to  seek  a  broader  field 
than  the  eastern  village  afforded,  and  upon  attaining  his  majority, 
in  1833,  he  removed  to  the  town  of  Westbrook,  Maine,  where  he 
engaged  in  the  business  of  beef  packing  with  considerable  success. 
He  remained  there  until  1854,  when  he  formed  a  business  copart- 
nership with  the  house  of  Cragin  &  Co.,  of  New  York,  and,  as  the 
western  member  of  the  firm,  immediately  came  to  Chicago,  where 
from  the  first  he  became  one  of  the  best  known  and  most  highly 
respected  residents  of  the  city,  taking  and  maintaining  a  high  place 
in  commercial  circles.  He  arrived  in  Chicago  in  May,  1854,  and 
immediately  began  the  erection  of  a  packing  house,  the  magnitude 
of  which  astonished  the  many  who  could  not  understand  where 
sufficient  business  could  be  obtained  to  keep  it  in  operation.  The 
plant  represented  an  investment  of  forty-five  thousand  dollars 
and  had  a  capacity  of  fifteen  hundred  barrels  of  dressed  meats  per 
day,  and  was,  in  fact,  one  of  the  best  establishments  of  its  kind  in 
existence.  Western  people  thought  there  existed  no  demand  for 
such  a  plant,  and  were  inclined  to  look  with  doubt  upon  the  judg- 
ment of  its  builder,  but  Colonel  Hancock,  with  unerring  vision, 
a  keen  discernment  born  of  optimism,  and  an  unflagging  belief  in 
the  growth  and  development  of  the  great  Northwest,  saw  beyond 
the  restrictions  of  the  moment  and  built  for  the  future.  That  his 
judgment  was  correct  has  long  since  been  demonstrated  by  the 
marvelous  growth  of  the  packing  industry.  Colonel  Hancock  thus 
€arly  became  a  factor  in  the  business  life  of  Chicago,  and  is  here, 
as  elsewhere,  given  recognition  as  one  of  the  pioneers  in  one  of 
the  great  basic  industries  of  the  city  and  nation.  From  the  moment 
of  his  arrival  in  Chicago  and  the  casting  in  of  his  lot  with  the  great 
West,  Colonel  Hancock  took  a  lively  and  an  active  interest  in  the 
Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  became  a  member  during  the  early 
days  of  its  struggle  for  existence.  He  was  elected  Second  Vice- 
President,  then  First  Vice-President.  In  1863  he  was  elected  Presi- 
dent, and  at  the  expiration  of  his  year  of  service  the  members  of 
the  Board  showed  their  high  appreciation  of  his  worth  and  ability 
by  conferring  upon  him  the  unusual  honor  of  re-electing  him.  by 
a  very  large  majority,  to  serve  a  second  term.  During  his  second 
term  as  President,  the  Board  of  Trade  found  itself  too  greatly 
restricted  by  lack  of  suitable  quarters  in  which  to  conduct  the 
rapidly  increasing  volume  of  its  business  and  a  movement  was 
started  looking  toward  the  construction  of  a  new  building.  An 
association  was  organized  for  this  purpose,  and  Colonel  Hancock 
subscribed  liberally  to  the  stock  and  gave  generously  of  his  time 
and  effort.  He  was  elected  a  director  of  the  Building  Association 
and  busied  himself  deeply  in  the  detail  and  work  of  bringing  the 
undertaking  to  a  satisfactory  and  successful  conclusion,  and  the 
new  building,  located  at  the  corner  of  La  Salle  and  Washington 
streets,  was  completed  and  occupied  in  1865.    This  handsome  struc- 


146  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

ture  was  completely  destroyed  in  the  great  fire  of  1871,  and  the 
Board  of  Trade  found  itself  without  a  home,  but  the  courage,  energy 
and  resources  of  the  members,  which  had  proved  equal  to  every 
former  emergency,  again  asserted  themselves,  and  plans  for  the 
construction  of  a  new  building  were  immediately  begun.  A  special 
building  committee  was  appointed,  of  which  Colonel  Hancock  was 
chosen  chairman,  a  preference  no  less  a  compliment  to  his  past 
effort  than  a  fitting  tribute  to  his  genius  and  constructive  ability 
for  the  future.  In  referring  to  this  particular  undertaking,  Andreas, 
in  his  History  of  Chicago,  says:  "On  October  11,  1871,  two  days 
after  the  destruction  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  with  its  library, 
trophies  and  valuable  papers,  the  directors  met  and  resolved  to 
reconstruct  their  building  on  the  old  site.  The  first  work  was 
done  on  October  14,  while  the  stone  and  the  brick  were  yet  warm. 
In  exactly  twelve  months  the  new  building  was  completed  and, 
at  noon  of  October  9,  1872,  was  formally  opened  and  the  Board 
of  Trade  installed  in  one  of  the  finest  buildings,  for  commercial 
purposes,  in  America."  An  illustration  appears  elsewhere  in  this 
work  showing  Colonel  Hancock  delivering  the  address  at  the  laying 
of  the  corner-stone.  Thus  it  was  given  him  to  be  an  active  factor 
in  the  securing  and  the  building  of  two  Chambers  of  Commerce 
occupied  by  the  Board  of  Trade.  It  is  impossible  within  the  limi- 
tations of  a  personal  review  of  this  character  to  deal  in  detail  with 
all  the  various  matters  of  importance  in  connection  with  the  Board 
of  Trade  with  which  Colonel  Hancock  was  connected,  or  to  enu- 
merate the  many  regulations  now  in  force  which  bear  the  unmis- 
takable imprint  of  his  personality  and  character,  and  to  which 
historical  reference  is  made  elsewhere.  It  is  not  alone  in  the  busi- 
ness world  that  Colonel  Hancock  won  merited  distinction,  for  in 
the  dark  hour  of  civil  strife,  when  our  existence  as  a  nation  was 
at  stake,  the  part  taken  by  the  Board  of  Trade  in  sustaining  the 
hands  of  the  government  all  through  the  long  night  of  its  darkest 
trial  is  well  known  as  forming  one  of  the  brightest  pages  in  our 
national  history,  and  if  there  be  one  to  whom  special  praise  is  due, 
it  is  Colonel  Hancock.  From  the  very  first,  he  was  ever  active, 
always  doing,  liberal  to  a  high  degree,  hopeful  when  many  others 
were  despondent,  and  ever  ready  to  aid  with  his  counsel  and  his 
purse.  He  took  an  active  part  in  raising  and  equipping  regiments 
for  the  field,  and  his  office  was  made  headquarters  for  the  organi- 
zation of  the  first  battalion  of  troops  that  was  called  out  to  duty 
at  Cairo.  Soon  after  their  departure.  Colonel  Hancock  was  sup- 
ported by  the  Board  of  Trade  in  the  endeavor  to  send  other  troops 
to  the  field,  and  he  centered  his  heart  and  soul  in  the  work.  It  was 
determined  to  raise  a  body  of  men  to  be  called  the  "Chicago  Board 
of  Trade  Battery."  A  war  committee  was  formed,  of  whcih  Colonel 
Hancock  was  chosen  chairman,  and  soon  the  battery  was  organized, 
equipped  and  went  forth  to  battle  for  the  integrity  of  the  nation, 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  147 

the  expense  being  borne  by  the  Board.  Thousands  of  dollars  were 
raised  again  and  again  on  'Change,  each  succeeding  request  finding 
the  purse  strings  open  as  liberally  as  at  first.  Colonel  Hancock 
not  only  ascended  the  platform  and  asked  for  contributions,  but 
he  gave  liberally  himself,  setting  a  noble  example  which  others 
were  not  slow  to  follow.  Though  shunning  ostentation,  he  did 
his  utmost  to  further  the  cause  of  the  Union,  and  it  is  authorita- 
tively said  that  he  contributed  of  his  personal  means  not  less  than 
fifty  thousand  dollars  to  the  cause.  As  chairman  of  the  war  com- 
mittee of  the  Board  of  Trade,  his  duties  were  ceaseless  and  his 
efforts  untiring.  In  1865  he  took  command  of  Camp  Fry,  and  under 
his  regime  the  One  Hundred  and  Forty-seventh,  One  Hundred  and 
Fifty-third  and  the  One  Hundred  and  Fifty-sixth  regiments,  Illinois 
volunteers,  were  organized,  besides  which  several  other  companies 
were  completed  for  other  regiments  depleted  by  service  in  the  field. 
In  1862  Colonel  Hancock  built  his  handsome  residence  on  Michigan 
avenue,  at  Twenty-sixth  street,  then  the  center  of  the  social  and 
fashionable  life  of  Chicago,  and  for  many  years  he  resided  there. 
He  was  a  firm  believer  in  the  future  greatness  of  the  city  in  which 
he  had  won  distinction  and  success,  and  in  whose  progress  he  had 
become  an  important  factor.  He  proved  his  faith  in  the  future  of 
the  city  by  investing  freely  in  property  holdings,  owning  at  one 
time  the  ground  later  occupied  by  Plymouth  and  Trinity  churches. 
Colonel  John  L.  Hancock  died  in  the  city  of  his  adoption  February 
17,  1883,  ripe  in  years  and  the  respect  of  his  fellow  men.  His 
funeral,  at  Plymouth  Church,  February  20,  was  attended  by  a 
large  concourse,  including  many  of  the  older  inhabitants  who  felt 
that  Chicago  had  lost  one  of  her  leading  spirits,  and  who  came 
to  pay  tribute  to  his  manhood.  As  an  individual,  John  L.  Hancock 
stood  exemplar  of  those  principles  which  tend  toward  the  better 
life.  All  of  his  dealings  were  marked  by  a  rigid  adherence  to  the 
principles  of  equity  and  fairness.  Scrupulously  honest,  he  could 
never  countenance,  much  less  practice,  any  of  those  petty  tricks 
which  too  often  pass  current  in  the  business  world.  Of  com- 
manding personal  appearance,  quick  and  of  keen  discernment,  he 
possessed  an  affability  and  charm  of  manner  that  won  and  held 
friendships  and  marked  him  among  his  fellows — an  American 
gentleman. 

David  H.  Harris. — Among  the  sterling  representatives  given 
to  the  Board  of  Trade  by  the  old  Buckeye  state  is  David  H.  Harris, 
who  has  been  a  member  of  this  great  commercial  organization  since 
December,  1888,  and  who  is  the  executive  head  of  the  well  known 
grain  brokerage  firm  of  D.  H.  Harris  &  Co.  He  has  won  success 
and  precedence  through  his  own  ability  and  well  ordered  endeavors, 
and  has  been  one  of  the  loyal  and  appreciative  factors  in  the  opera- 
tions and  governmental  affairs  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  in  which 
he  has  served  on  various  important  committees.     Mr.  Harris  was 


148  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

born  in  the  city  of  Portsmouth,  Scioto  County,  Ohio,  on  the  Ohio 
river,  and  the  date  of  his  nativity  was  February  22,  1862.     He  is 
a  son  of  William  and  Ann   (Lewis)    Harris,  who  continued  their 
residence  in   Ohio  until   their  death.     In   the   public   schools   Mr. 
Harris  continued  his  studies  until   his  graduation  from  the   high 
school,  and  when  he  was  a  lad  of  sixteen  years  he  became  virtually 
dependent  upon  his  own  resources,  with  a  determination   to  win 
for  himself  the  fullest  possible  measure  of  independence  and  pros- 
perity and  with  an  ambition  that  was  governed  by  sterling  integ- 
rity of  purpose.     At  the  age  noted  Mr.  Harris  went  to  the  city  of 
Cincinnati,   where   he   obtained   employment   as   a   bellboy   in   the 
Hotel  Emery.     Here  he  made  the  best  of  his  opportunities,  and 
while  thus  engaged  he  was  fortunate  in  forming  the  acquaintance 
of  R.   H.   Robinson,  one  of  the  leading  brokers   and  commission 
grain  dealers  of  the  Queen  City.     Mr.   Robinson  appreciated  the 
ambition  of  young  Harris  and  finally  gave  to  him  a  position   in 
his  ofifice.    The  former  bellboy  here  found  an  excellent  opportunity 
to  gain  business  experience  of  enduring  value,  and  that  he  fully 
profited  by  the  advantages  thus  afforded  is  evidenced  by  the  fact 
that  about  1885  he  was  admitted  to  partnership  in  the  business, 
under  the  firm  name  of  R.  H.  Robinson  &  Co.     In   1888  the  firm 
retired  from  business,  and  in  September  of  that  year  Mr.  Harris 
came  to  Chicago,  where  he  felt  assured  of  a  broader  field  of  enter- 
prise in  the  line  of  business  to  which  he  had  thoroughly  trained 
himself.     He  forthwith  assumed  a  position  with  the  commission 
firm  of  Pope  &  Lewis,  and  in  December  of  the  same  year  he  became 
a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.    His  operations  have  at  all  times 
been  characterized  by  energy  and  good  judgment,  and  by  those 
inviolable   principles   of  honor  that   alone   can   form   the   basis   of 
worthy  success.     Mr.   Harris  has  made  an   admirable   record  as 
one  of  the  influential  exponents  of  the  grain  commission  business 
and      as      an      active      and      loyal      participant      in      the      aflfairs 
and     operations      of      the      Board      of      Trade,      in      which      his 
circle     of     friends     is     coincident     with     that     of     his     acquaint- 
ances.    In  1896    he    effected    the    organization    of    the    present 
commission    firm    of    D.    H.    Harris    &    Co.,    which    controls    a 
substantial  and  representative  business  in  general  grain  brokerage. 
As  a  youth  Mr.  Harris  served  as  a  member  of  the  Ohio  National 
Guard,  and  in  the  time-honored  Masonic  fraternity  has  not  only 
completed  the  circle  of  the  York  Rite,  but  has  received  also  the 
thirty-second  degree  of  the  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  besides 
being  identified  with  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  of  the  Nobles  of 
the  Mystic  Shrine.     He  holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Automo- 
bile Club  and  the  Chicago  Yacht  Club,  and  both  he  and  his  wife 
are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church.     On  the  twenty-second 
of  February,   1903,  was     recorded  the  marriage  of  Mr.   Harris  to 
Miss  Antoinette  Hernbeek,  of  Burlington,   Iowa,  and  they  have 
two  children — Jane  and  David. 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  149 

Mervin  C.  Harvey.- — Far  beyond  mere  local  limitations  ramifies 
the  extensive  business  of  the  well-known  and  influential  firm  of 
Otis  &  Co.,  investment  bankers  and  grain  commission  merchants 
in  the  city  of  Cleveland,  Ohio,  in  which  State  the  concern  maintains 
branch  offices  at  Columbus,  Akron  and  Youngstown,  as  does  it  also 
in  the  cities  of  Denver  and  Colorado  Springs,  Colorado.  Of  this 
firm  Mervin  Clark  Harvey  is  a  member  and  the  general  manager, 
and  he  also  represents  the  same  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City 
of  Chicago,  of  which  he  has  been  a  member  since  1912,  besides 
which  the  firm  has  similar  representation  in  the  New  York  Stock 
Exchange.  Mr.  Harvey  was  born  in  the  city  of  Cleveland,  Ohio, 
on  the  25th  of  June,  1877,  and  is  a  scion  of  one  of  the  sterling 
pioneer  families  of  this  commonwealth.  He  is  one  of  the  three 
children  born  to  Harry  A.  and  Mary  (Williams)  Harvey,  and  his 
father,  who  died  in  1880,  passed  his  entire  life  in  Ohio,  his  principal 
vocation  during  a  signally  active  and  successful  career  having  been 
the  operation  of  flouring  mills.  He  whose  name  introduces  this 
review  continued  his  studies  in  the  public  schools  of  Cleveland  until 
he  had  completed  the  curriculum  of  the  high  school  and  thereafter 
he  continued  his  studies  for  a  time  in  Cleveland  University.  He 
next  entered  historic  old  Yale  University,  and  in  this  institution  he 
was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  1901  Mr. 
Harvey  engaged  in  the  stock  and  grain  commission  business  in 
Cleveland,  and  with  these  important  lines  of  enterprise  he  has  since 
continued  his  active  and  successful  association.  His  original  alli- 
ance was  with  the  firm  of  Otis  &  Hough,  which  was  succeeded 
by  the  present  firm  of  Otis  &  Co.  in  1912,  Mr.  Harvey  becoming 
one  of  the  members  of  the  new  organization  and  being  now  its 
vigorous  and  able  General  Manager.  This  firm  has  developed  a 
substantial  business  in  the  handling  of  high-grade  securities  as 
well  as  in  the  domain  of  commission  operation  in  the  grain  trade. 
Otis  &  Co.  retain  a  corps  of  efficient  employes,  as  here  noted : 
Twenty-five  on  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange ;  twenty-three  on  the 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade ;  fifteen  salesmen ;  six  in  the  branch  office 
at  Columbus,  five  in  Akron,  six  in  Youngstown,  and  six  each  in 
the  offices  at  Denver  and  Colorado  Springs.  Mr.  Harvey  was 
married  to  Miss  Virginia  Bonnell,  daughter  of  Martin  Bonnell,  of 
Cleveland. 

Edward  G.  Heeman. — When  it  is  stated  that  Mr.  Heeman  is  a 
man  of  exceptionally  alert  and  vigorous  mentality  and  that  he  has 
been  actively  concerned  with  the  grain  business  since  he  was  a  lad 
of  about  fifteen  years,  it  may  readily  be  understood  that  he  has 
become  recognized  as  a  virtual  adept  and  authority  in  this  important 
line  of  commercial  enterprise,  in  which  he  has  long  been  engaged 
in  Chicago  and  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  He  has  been  a  member  of 
the  Board  since  September,  1894.  He  has  profited  in  every  sense 
from  the  broad  and  varied  experience  which  has  been  his  in  the 


150  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

grain  commission  trade,  and  he  controls  a  substantial  and  creditable 
business,  with  offices  in  the  Board  of  Trade  Building.  In  1881, 
within  a  short  time  after  leaving  school,  Mr.  Heeman  became  iden- 
tified with  the  grain  commission  trade  in  Chicago,  and  from  a 
clerical  position  he  won  advancement  to  that  of  traveling  solicitor. 
After  having  become  adequately  fortified  in  his  knowledge  of  the 
various  details  of  the  business  he  finally  established  an  independent 
enterprise  and  his  activities  have  since  continued  successfully  in 
the  handling  of  a  large  and  prosperous  commission  business,  the 
while  he  is  one  of  the  thoroughly  appreciative  and  valued  members 
of  the  Board  of  Trade,  on  which  his  operations  are  invariably 
directed  with  discretion  and  well-ordered  conservatism.  Mr.  Hee- 
man was  born  in  the  city  of  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  on  the  13th  of  Janu- 
ary, 1867,  and  is  a  son  of  Henry  and  Mary  Heeman.  His  early 
education  was  obtained  in  the  Catholic  parochial  schools  and  he 
maintains  his  home  in  Chicago.  His  character  is  the  positive  ex- 
pression of  a  strong  and  loyal  nature,  and  he  has  achieved  sub- 
stantial and  worthy  success  and  a  secure  place  in  popular  confi- 
dence and  esteem.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the 
Catholic  church.  On  the  23rd  of  September,  1893,  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Heeman  to  Miss  Helen  May  Andrews,  of  Chi- 
cago.   They  have  no  children. 

Frank  T.  Heffelfinger. — A  vigorous  and  influential  factor  in 
the  extensive  grain  operations  of  the  great  Northwest,  Mr.  Heffel- 
finger maintains  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago,  and  in  this  important  commercial  organization  is  the 
representative  of  the  Minneapolis  corporation  of  F.  H.  Peavey  & 
Co.,  of  which  he  is  President,  this  being  one  of  the  largest  grain 
and  elevator  concerns  of  the  entire  Northwest.  He  is  President 
also  of  the  Duluth  Terminal.  Mr.  Heffelfinger  is  one  of  the  active 
and  valued  members  of  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
the  Milwaukee  Grain  Exchange  and  the  Winnipeg  Grain  Exchange. 
He  has  been  actively  identified  with  the  important  phases  of  grain 
operations  in  the  Northwest  since  1897  and  succeeded  his  father- 
in-law,  the  late  Frank  H.  Peavey,  as  executive  head  of  the  impor- 
tant corporation  that  was  founded  by  the  latter  and  that  perpetuates 
his  name.  Frank  H.  Peavey,  who  left  a  large  and  benignant  impress 
upon  the  industrial  and  commercial  history  of  Minneapolis  and  the 
Northwest,  was  President  of  F.  H.  Peavey  &  Co.  at  the  time  of  his 
death,  which  occurred  in  the  city  of  Chicago,  on  the  30th  of  Decem- 
ber, 1901.  He  was  a  man  of  splendid  initiative  and  executive  ability, 
and  it  was  given  him  to  define  and  develop  what  has  been  desig- 
nated as  the  most  extensive  grain  and  elevator  business  in  the 
world,  the  operations  of  the  company  which  he  founded  extending 
throughout  the  great  grain-producing  regions  of  the  entire  West. 
Mr.  Peavey  was  born  at  Eastport,  Maine,  on  the  20th  of  January, 
18.S0,  and  thus  was  but  little  past  the  half-century  mark  at  the  time 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  151 

of  his  death,  after  an  achievement  that  had  been  prodigious  and 
that  had  gained  him  distinction  and  honor.  He  was  a  son  of  Albert 
D.  and  Mary  (Drew)  Peavey,  both  natives  of  New  England  and 
both  representatives  of  fine  old  colonial  families.  Like  many  other 
of  the  sturdy  sons  of  New  England,  Mr.  Peavey  found  in  the  West 
the  opportunities  for  the  fulfilling  of  his  ambitious  purpose  and  for 
the  winning  of  large  and  worthy  success  that  had  definite  bearing 
on  general  civic  and  industrial  prosperity.  In  1873,  he  established 
himself  in  the  grain  business  at  Sioux  City,  Iowa,  and  from  small 
beginnings  he  developed  one  of  the  greatest  of  the  nation's  com- 
mercial enterprises  in  the  buying  and  shipping  of  grain.  A  man 
whose  life  was  guided  and  governed  by  the  highest  principles,  he 
merited  and  received  the  unequivocal  confidence  and  good  will  of 
his  fellow  men,  and  the  results  of  his  life  and  labors  are  far-reaching 
in  their  widening  angle  now  that  he  has  passed  away.  The  maiden 
name  of  his  wife  was  Mary  Dibble  Wright,  and  of  their  three 
children  the  daughter,  Laura  J.,  is  the  wife  of  Frank  T.  Hefifeliinger, 
who  succeeded  Mr.  Peavey  as  head  of  the  corporation  of  F.  H. 
Peavey  &  Co.  Frank  T.  Heffelfinger  was  born  in  September,  1869, 
and  is  a  son  of  Charles  B.  and  Margaret  L.  (Tolen)  Hefifelfinger. 
He  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  for  his  early  education,  and 
in  connection  with  the  active  affairs  of  business  he  has  proved 
himself  energetic,  resourceful  and  progressive,  so  that  he  is  well 
fortified  for  meeting  the  manifold  exactions  of  the  extensive  indus- 
trial and  commercial  enterprise  of  which  he  is  now  the  executive 
head,  his  association  with  the  grain  business  having  been  begun 
in  1897.  The  offices  of  F.  H.  Peavey  &  Co.  are  in  the  building  of 
the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce,  of  which  organization  Mr. 
Hefifelfinger  is  a  member.  He  is  a  stalwart  in  the  camp  of  the 
Republican  party,  is  identified  with  clubs  and  civic  organizations 
in  his  home  city,  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian 
church,  and  the  family  residence  is  at  1828  Third  avenue,  South. 
Mr.  Hefifelfinger  was  married  to  Miss  Laura  J.  Peavey,  and  they 
have  four  children.  Mrs.  Heffelfinger's  only  sister  is  the  wife  of 
Frederick  B.  Wells,  of  Minneapolis,  and  her  only  brother  is  George 
W.  Peavey. 

Andrew  J.  Helmer. — He  whose  name  initiates  this  review  has 
been  a  resident  of  Iroquois  County,  Illinois,  since  his  boyhood  and 
has  here  gained  distinctive  success  and  prestige  as  one  of  the  exten- 
sive agriculturists  and  landholders  of  the  county  and  also  as  a  buyer 
and  shipper  of  grain,  his  well-equipped  elevator  being  established 
at  Hickman.  He  has  been  identified  with  the  grain  business  since 
he  was  a  young  man  and  has  become  one  of  its  prominent  and  in- 
fluential representatives  in  his  home  county,  his  activities  having 
led  him  to  avail  himself  of  the  advantages  and  privileges  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  of  which  he  has  been  a  mem- 
ber since  1892,  with  secure  place  in  the  confidence  and  good  will 


152  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

of  his  fellow  members.  He  maintains  his  residence  in  the  attractive 
village  of  Cissna  Park,  and  is  one  of  the  leading  grain  dealers  of 
this  section  of  Iroquois  county,  his  careful  and  honorable  methods 
having  been  potent  in  the  gaining  of  the  confidence  and  esteem  of 
the  grain  producers  of  the  county  and  in  the  development  of  his 
substantial  business.  Mr.  Helmer  was  born  in  the  Province  of 
Ontario,  Canada,  on  the  30th  of  June,  1861,  and  is  one  of  the  nine 
children  born  to  James  and  Jane  (Smith)  Helmer,  both  likewise 
natives  of  Canada.  James  Helmer  came  with  his  family  to  Illinois 
in  1863  and  purchased  a  tract  of  land  near  Cissna  Park,  Iroquois 
County,  where  he  eventually  developed  and  improved  a  valuable 
farm  of  large  area,  besides  which  he  became  the  owner  and  operator 
of  a  well-equipped  flour  mill,  both  he  and  his  wife  having  passed 
the  remainder  of  their  lives  in  this  county,  where  he  did  well  his 
part  in  the  furtherance  of  civic  and  industrial  progress.  Andrew  J. 
Helmer  was  about  two  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the  family 
removal  to  Iroquois  County,  where  he  was  reared  to  the  invigor- 
ating discipline  of  the  farm  and  where  he  profited  by  the  advantages 
afiforded  in  the  public  schools  of  the  period.  He  has  never  severed 
his  allegiance  to  the  basic  industry  of  agriculture  and  is  today  the 
owner  of  an  extensive  and  well-improved  landed  estate  in  Iroquois 
County,  where  also  he  has  been  actively  identified  with  the  grain 
business  since  1883.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Masonic  fraternity 
and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  and  is  a  communicant  of  the 
Protestant  Episcopal  church,  in  the  faith  of  which  he  was  reared, 
his  wife  being  a  communicant  of  the  Catholic  church.  Mr.  Helmer 
took  for  his  wife  Miss  Helen  R.  Connor,  daughter  of  the  late  Patrick 
Connor,  of  Iroquois  County,  and  the  one  child  of  this  union  is 
John  R.,  who  is  editor  and  publisher  of  the  Cissna  Park  News, 
which  he  has  made  an  effective  exponent  of  community  interests. 
Joseph  A.  Henebry. — Since  the  year  1915  Mr.  Henebry  has 
been  an  active  and  popular  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  and  he  maintains  his  residence  at  Plainfield,  where 
he  is  Vice-President  and  General  Manager  of  the  Plainfield  Grain 
Company,  one  of  the  important  concerns  in  the  grain,  coal,  feed, 
lumber  and  building  material  business  in  northeastern  Illinois. 
The  company  maintains  elevators  and  yards  at  Plainfield,  Caton 
Farm,  Frontenac,  Normantown  'and  Wolf's  Crossing,  and  the 
business  is  one  of  broad  scope,  involving  in  its  prosecution  correct 
methods  and  progressive  executive  direction.  The  other  officers 
of  the  company  are  as  here  noted :  W.  H.  Cryder,  President ;  C.  F. 
Hartong,  Secretary  and  Treasurer.  Mr.  Henebry  has  been  a  resi- 
dent of  Plainfield  since  1912  and  as  a  practical  grain  man  has  done 
much  to  further  the  success  of  the  Plainfield  Grain  Company,  with 
which  he  identified  himself  upon  establishing  his  home  there.  His 
initial  experience  in  the  grain  trade  was  gained  at  Beardstown, 
Illinois,  and  later  he  continued  his  association  with  the  business  at 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  153 

Assumption  and  Morris,  from  which  latter  place  he  removed  to 
Plainfield.  He  has  been  Vice-President  of  the  Plainfield  Grain  Com- 
pany since  1915,  and  had  previously  served  as  General  Manager, 
of  which  position  he  still  continues  the  efficient  and  popular  incum- 
bent. The  company  operates  seven  elevators,  and  its  annual  volume 
of  business  marks  it  as  one  of  the  leading  concerns  in  the  grain 
business  in  that  part  of  Illinois.  Mr.  Henebry,  one  of  the  four  sur- 
vivors in  a  family  of  eleven  children,  was  born  near  Decatur,  Macon 
County,  this  State,  August  11,  1881,  and  is  a  son  of  Philip  and 
Bridget  (Thorpe)  Henebry,  the  father  having  long  been  numbered 
among  the  prosperous  farmers  of  Illinois.  Joseph  A.  Henebry 
profited  duly  by  the  advantages  aflforded  in  the  public  schools  of 
his  native  county,  including  the  Decatur  high  school,  and  there- 
after he  pursued  a  higher  academic  course  at  St.  Mary's  Sem- 
inary, at  Perryville.  His  entire  business  career  has  been  one  of 
close  and  efifective  association  with  the  grain  business,  and  his 
ability  and  sterling  character  have  gained  to  him  unqualified  popu- 
lar esteem,  both  as  a  business  man  and  as  a  loyal  and  progressive 
citizen.  He  and  his  family  are  communicants  of  the  Catholic  church 
and  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  Mr.  Henebry 
was  married  to  Miss  Hannah  Blair,  a  daughter  of  John  Blair,  of  this 
State,  and  the  two  children  of  this  union  are  Joseph  A.,  Jr.,  and 
Marcella  B. 

William  L.  Heptig. — Not  uneventful  has  been  the  career  of  this 
well-known  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  Prior  to  turning  his 
attention  to  the  grain  commission  business  he  had  gained  experi- 
ence as  a  telegraph  operator,  newspaper  reporter  and  as  a  writer  of 
sporting  news,  in  which  last  mentioned  phase  of  practical  journalism 
he  made  an  excellent  record,  the  while  there  was  quickened  a  lively 
appreciation  of  normal  and  invigorating  sports  that  has  not  waned 
with  the  passing  years.  His  initial  business  experience  was  gained 
in  the  capacity  of  telegraph  messenger  boy,  and  from  this  he  was 
led  to  study  the  art  of  telegraphy,  with  the  result  that  he  became  a 
skilled  operator  and  laid  the  foundation  for  the  success  which  he 
has  since  achieved  in  a  broader  and  more  exacting  field  of  endeavor, 
his  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  dating  from  September  16, 
1914,  and  his  general  brokerage  and  commission  business  being 
now  conducted  under  the  title  of  William  L.  Heptig  &  Co.,  with 
office  headquarters  at  55  Board  of  Trade  Building.  William  Louis 
Heptig  was  born  in  the  city  of  Springfield,  Ohio,  December  23, 
1880,  and  is  a  son  of  Emil  and  Mary  Heptig.  His  early  education 
was  acquired  in  the  Catholic  parochial  schools  and  thereafter  he 
availed  himself  of  the  advantages  of  the  Springfield  high  school. 
When,  succeeding  his  earlier  business  experience,  he  took  up  the 
grain  commmission  and  brokerage  business  in  Chicago,  his  advance- 
ment in  the  same  was  rapid  and  successful,  the  direct  result  of  pre- 
vious experience  and  the  application  of  his  own  ability  and  energies. 


154  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

He  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Catholic  church  and  he  is 
affihated  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  His  marriage  occurred  on 
the  27th  of  November,  1902,  and  two  children  are  the  fruit  of  this 
union. 

William  Hereley,  Jr. — At  the  head  of  a  business  that  was 
founded  by  his  father  in  1872,  Mr.  Hereley  is  a  successful  exponent 
of  the  hay,  grain  and  feed  trade  in  his  native  city,  and  has  been  an 
active  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  December,  1912.  He  is 
President  and  Treasurer  of  the  William  Hereley  Company,  the 
headquarters  of  which  are  established  at  315-19  Chicago  avenue, 
and  this  concern  has  long  controlled  a  large  and  important  business 
in  the  handling  of  grain,  hay  and  feed.  Mr.  Hereley  was  born  in 
Chicago  on  the  29th  of  October,  1879,  and  is  a  son  of  William  and 
Maria  (Byrne)  Hereley.  He  acquired  his  preliminary  education  in 
the  public  schools  of  this  city,  and  in  1896  he  was  graduated  from 
De  La  Salle  Institute,  from  which  excellent  Chicago  institution  he 
received  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  the  same  year  he 
became  associated  with  his  father  in  the  hay  and  grain  business, 
which  the  latter  had  established  in  1872,  as  has  been  noted  above. 
He  has  fully  upheld  in  this  connection  the  high  prestige  of  the 
family  name  and  is  one  of  the  alert  and  progressive  business  men  of 
the  younger  generation  represented  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus 
and  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose,  and  holds  membership  in  the  South 
Shore  Country  Club  and  the  Ridgemoor  Country  Club.  Both  he 
and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Catholic  church,  in  which 
their  membership  is  maintained  in  the  parish  of  St.  Thomas  of 
Canterbury.  On  the  27th  of  April,  1904,  was  solemnized  the  mar- 
riage of  Mr.  Hereley  to  Miss  Grace  Brady,  of  Chicago,  and  they 
have  one  daughter — Stella  Cecelia. 

John  Hill,  Jr. — In  the  recorded  history  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  the  City  of  Chicago  more  than  passing  distinction  attaches  to  the 
name  of  John  Hill,  Jr.,  who  is  now  President  of  Hill's  National 
Reporting  Company,  one  of  the  representative  commercial  agencies 
of  the  United  States  and  one  whose  functions  and  influence  are 
benignant,  important  and  far-reaching.  The  special  credit  that 
inures  to  Mr.  Hill  in  connection  with  the  history  and  operations  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  has  its  basis  in  his  vigorous  leadership  in  con- 
nection with  the  movement  and  fight  against  the  pernicious  influ- 
ences of  bucket  shops  and  other  forms  of  irregular  and  clandestine 
trading.  In  his  association  with  this  commendable  and  momentous 
action  his  courage  and  determination  were  on  a  parity  with  his 
discrimination,  vigor  and  finesse  in  directing  the  forces  that  purged 
the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  odium  that  had  been  reflected  upon  it 
through  the  activities  of  the  bucket  shops  and  the  machinations  of 
illegitimate  traders.  With  unabating  zeal  and  ability  he  waged  this 
warfare  in  the  interests  of  the  Board  of  Trade  during  the  memorable 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  155 

period  extending  between  1897  and  1905,  and  the  results  which  he 
aided  in  gaining  should  stand  in  enduring  testimony  to  his  high 
business  ideals  and  his  unselfish  loyalty  to  the  noble  commercial 
body  of  which  he  has  long  been  a  prominent  and  valued  member. 
Mr.  Hill  was  born  at  Peru,  LaSalle  County,  Illinois,  on  the  23d 
of  November,  1856,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Elizabeth  (Donohue) 
Hill.  He  was  a  lad  of  about  five  years  at  the  time  of  the  family 
removal  to  Chicago,  in  1861,  and  in  the  public  schools  of  the  future 
metropolis  of  the  West  he  acquired  his  early  educational  training. 
At  the  age  of  sixteen  years  Mr.  Hill  found  employment  in  the  office 
of  William  G.  Purdy,  cashier  of  the  Chicago,  Rock  Island  &  Pacific 
Railroad,  and  this  association  continued  until  the  year  1876,  when 
he  marked  the  centennial  of  America's  national  independence  by 
identifying  himself  with  the  grain  commission  house  of  McLand- 
burgh  &  Co.,  with  which  he  remained  until  1881  and  gained  inti- 
mate and  valuable  experience  in  the  business  to  which  he  then 
directed  his  attention  in  an  independent  way.  In  1889  he  became 
one  of  the  principals  in  the  commission  firm  of  McCourtie,  Hill  & 
Co.,  with  which  he  continued  his  successful  activities  as  a  broker 
and  trader  until  1897,  when  he  retired  from  the  firm  and  girded 
himself  strenuously  for  the  earnest  and  successful  fight  which  he 
was  to  wage  in  behalf  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  to  compass  the 
extinction  of  the  bucket  shops  and  all  illegal  methods  and  policies 
of  trading.  With  this  spirited  and  meritorious  movement  he  con- 
tinued his  activities  as  a  resourceful  leader  until  victory  crowned 
his  efforts,  and  he  then,  in  1905,  became  the  founder  of  Hill's 
National  Reporting  Company,  of  which  he  has  since  been  Presi- 
dent and  which  he  has  made  a  definite  and  valuable  factor  in  the 
furtherance  and  protection  of  commercial  interests,  especially  those 
applying  to  the  commission  trade  in  grain,  provisions,  stocks  and 
bonds.  Mr.  Hill  was  elected  a  Director  of  the  Board  of  Trade  in 
1892  and  was  re-elected  in  1895,  and  from  1896  to  1898,  inclusive, 
he  was  chairman  of  its  bucket  shop  committee.  His  activities  ex- 
panded into  a  wider  field  in  connection  with  the  suppression  of 
illegitimate  business  and  other  agencies  of  pernicious  order,  and 
in  1896  he  was  a  member  and  chairman  of  the  committee  on  gam- 
bling of  that  sterling  organization,  the  Civic  Federation  of  Chicago. 
In  many  other  directions  have  his  civic  loyalty  and  progressive 
spirit  been  shown,  and  he  is  consistently  to  be  designated  as  one 
of  the  broad-minded  and  representative  citizens  of  Chicago,  where 
his  antagonisms  have  ever  begotten  the  enmity  of  those  whom  he 
would  rather  call  enemies  than  friends.  Mr.  Hill  is  affiliated  with 
the  Masonic  fraternity,  the  Royal  Arcanum  and  the  Royal  League. 
He  has  a  distinct  predilection  for  sports  afield  and  afloat,  but  is 
not  unduly  vainglorious  concerning  his  prowess  as  a  piscatorial 
adept,  inasmuch  as  he  has  never  essayed  the  task  of  drawing  forth 
leviathans  with  a  hook.     He  is  a  student  of  economic  and  govern- 


156  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

mental  affairs  and  as  a  lover  of  the  best  in  literature  has  given 
much  attention  to  the  collection  of  books,  with  the  result  that  he 
has  a  large  and  select  private  library  of  most  valuable  and  inter- 
esting order.  In  May,  1881,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr. 
Hill  to  Miss  Nellie  M.  Graham,  daughter  of  Charles  H.  and  Dorothy 
(Douglas)  Graham,  and  the  two  children  of  this  union  are  Dorothy 
and  Jessie. 

James  K.  Hooper. — Among  the  men  prominently  identified 
with  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  as  well  as  with  the  industrial 
and  social  life  of  the  country,  few  have  gained  a  higher  reputation 
for  ability  and  keenness  of  discernment  than  has  James  Kimball 
Hooper,  of  Chicago.  He  was  born  in  Walpole,  Cheshire  County, 
New  Hampshire,  April  24,  1852,  a  son  of  Henry  and  Mary  (Chase) 
Hooper,  and  he  fully  exemplifies  the  alert,  enterprising  character 
for  which  the  people  of  New  England  have  always  been  noted. 
His  boyhood  days  were  spent  upon  a  farm,  where  he  was  taught 
the  habits  of  industry  and  economy,  the  environment  being  a  valu- 
able one  during  the  formative  period  of  his  life.  Developing  an 
aptitude  for  business,  however,  he  entered  commercial  life  at  an 
early  age,  and  for  some  years  was  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of 
cigars  at  South  Charlestown,  New  Hampshire.  In  1874  Mr.  Hooper 
became  identified  with  the  grain  business,  and  for  many  years 
was  one  of  the  prominent  operators  throughout  the  eastern  states. 
He  maintained  offices  at  Boston,  Massachusetts,  and  Portland, 
Maine,  and  conducted  a  successful  business  at  both  places.  In  1890 
he  removed  to  Chicago  to  become  manager  for  Irwin,  Green  &  Co., 
grain  commissioners.  About  five  years  later  he  formed  a  partner- 
ship with  David  S.  Lasier,  in  the  firm  of  Lasier  &  Hooper.  This 
connection  continued  until  December  30,  1905,  when  the  business 
was  incorporated  under  the  title  of  the  Lasier-Hooper  Company,  of 
which  Mr.  Hooper  was  President.  In  January,  1907,  the  firm  name 
was  changed  to  the  Hooper  Grain  Company,  and  he  was  the  execu- 
tive head  of  this  company  until  its  dissolution,  in  November,  1915. 
The  house  made  a  specialty  of  "Sunny  Jim  Oats,"  and  was  one  of 
the  leading  concerns  of  its  kind  in  the  city,  being  the  largest  dealers 
in  that  line  in  the  West,  the  export  sales  on  this  specialty  alone 
reaching  twenty  million  bushels  in  one  year.  He  also  had  two 
elevators  in  Chicago,  and  often  ran  at  an  average  of  one  hundred 
cars  per  day.  Believing  in  the  basis  of  the  nimble  sixpence,  the 
elevators  were  continuously  operated,  both  day  and  night,  and  at 
the  time  of  discontinuing  business,  he  had  one  hundred  and  six 
employes  on  his  pay  roll.  Since  the  dissolution  of  this  firm  Mr. 
Hooper  has  practically  retired  from  active  business,  although  he 
maintains  an  office  at  140  West  Van  Buren  street,  and  still  deals 
more  or  less  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  Although  quiet  and  unassum- 
ing in  manner,  he  has  many  warm  friends,  and  is  recognized  as  a 
man  of  earnest  purpose  and  progressive  principles.     He  has  always 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  157 

stood  for  the  things  that  are  right,  and  for  the  advancement  of  citi- 
zenship, and  is  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  modern  improve- 
ments along  material,  intellectual  and  moral  lines.  Besides  being 
a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  he  was  for  many  years 
identified  with  the  Illinois  Manufacturers'  Association  and  the  Chi- 
cago Association  of  Commerce.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Royal 
League,  National  Union,  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  Mutual  Benefit 
Association,  New  England  Society,  and  the  Union  League  Club  and 
South  Shore  and  Beverly  Country  Clubs.  He  is  fond  of  golf,  motor- 
ing and  travel.  He  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Beverly  Club, 
being  chairman  of  the  land  association  and  influential  in  making  the 
club  a  success.  He  also  acted  as  financial  chairman  and  governor 
for  the  club  for  many  years.  On  October  27,  1882,  Mr.  Hooper  was 
united  in  marriage  with  Miss  Mary  Milliken,  of  Alstead,  New 
Hampshire,  a  woman  of  high  character  and  active  in  charitable 
work,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  three  children — Rena  A., 
Frances  and  James  M.  Although  Mr.  Hooper  takes  no  active  part 
in  politics,  he  is  interested  in  political  reform,  and  always  casts  the 
weight  of  his  influence  in  support  of  men  and  measures  working 
for  the  public  good.  He  is  unfaltering  in  his  opposition  to  a  course 
which  he  deems  inimical  to  the  best  interests  of  the  country  and 
people,  and  few  men  in  Chicago  have  been  more  active  in  all  good 
work. 

Frank  L.  Hough. — To  the  credit  and  distinction  of  Mr.  Hough 
is  a  consecutive  association  with  the  grain  business  in  Illinois  for 
fully  half  a  century,  his  identification  with  this  important  line  of 
commercial  activity  having  been  instituted  within  less  than  two 
years  after  he  had  attained  to  his  legal  majority.  The  passing  years 
have  been  marked  by  earnest,  worthy  and  productive  effort  on  his 
part  and  he  continues  to  be  known  and  honored  as  one  of  the  well- 
known  figures  in  the  grain  trade  of  northern  and  western  Illinois. 
Since  1870  he  has  maintained  his  home  at  Woodhull,  Henry  County, 
and  prior  to  this  he  had,  in  1867,  established  himself  in  the  grain 
business  at  Galesburg,  in  which  city  he  resided  until  his  removal 
to  Woodhull.  He  has  long  controlled  a  business  of  large  volume, 
and  in  addition  to  his  well-equipped  grain  elevator  at  Woodhull  he 
operates  also  a  well-ordered  chain  of  elevators  at  such  eligible 
locations  as  Orion,  Osco,  Lynn  Center  and  Alpha,  all  in  Henry 
County;  at  Viola  and  New  Windsor,  in  Mercer  County;  at  Rio, 
Knox  County,  and  at  Alpine,  Cook  County.  Though  Mr.  Hough 
has  always  been  appreciative  of  the  functions  and  influence  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  he  has  maintained  active 
membership  in  the  same  only  since  April  9,  1913,  and  as  one  of 
the  veteran  grain  men  of  the  State  he  is  held  as  a  valued  and 
honored  member  of  this  great  commercial  organization,  even  as  he 
has  long  been  one  of  the  leading  business  men  and  influential  citi- 
zens of  Woodhull,  where  his  coterie  of  friends  is  limited  only  by 


158  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

that  of  the  population  of  the  thriving  village.  Mr.  Hough  was 
born  in  Marshall  County,  Illinois,  October  12,  1844,  and  is  a  son 
of  Rev.  Osmus  M.  and  Matilda  (Myers)  Hough,  the  father  having 
been  born  and  reared  in  the  State  of  New  York  and  having  become 
one  of  the  pioneer  clergymen  in  Marshall  County,  Illinois,  where 
he  established  his  residence  in  1840  and  where  his  death  occurred 
in  1847.  He  was  survived  by  two  sons,  and  his  widow  later  con- 
tracted a  second  marriage,  of  which  were  born  two  daughters. 
Frank  L.  Hough  was  a  child  of  about  three  years  at  the  time  of  his 
father's  death,  and  was  reared  to  adult  age  in  his  native  county. 
He  not  only  profited  duly  by  the  advantages  of  the  common  schools 
of  the  locality  and  period,  but  also  by  those  of  Lombard  College,  at 
Galesburg,  and  he  was  twenty-two  years  of  age  when  he  engaged  in 
the  grain  business  in  that  city,  whence  he  removed  to  Woodhull. 
He  is  a  Republican  in  politics  and  as  a  citizen  has  been  progressive 
and  public-spirited,  with  due  appreciation  of  the  stewardship  which 
personal  success  imposes. 

Louis  A.  Howard. — The  initial  experience  which  Mr.  Howard 
acquired  in  connection  with  the  grain  trade  was  in  association  with 
the  business  conducted  by  his  father  in  the  State  of  Iowa,  and 
later  he  had  for  nearly  ten  years  direct  alliance  with  the  grain 
commission  trade  in  Chicago,  where  he  established  his  residence 
in  1896  and  where  he  remained  until  1905,  when  he  removed  to  the 
city  of  Minneapolis,  where  he  has  since  gained  definite  success 
and  influence  as  a  progressive  exponent  of  the  grain  commission 
business,  his  offices  being  at  1015  Chamber  of  Commerce  Building. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and 
he  is  also  one  of  the  active  and  influential  members  of  the  Minne- 
apolis Chamber  of  Commerce,  his  business  being  conducted  in  an 
entirely  individual  and  independent  way  and  his  experience  making 
him  a  careful  and  successful  trader.  Mr.  Howard  was  born  in 
Iowa  on  the  24th  of  November,  1878,  and  is  a  son  of  William  H.  and 
Sarah  J.  (Crill)  Howard,  his  father  having  been  a  successful  grain 
operator  in  the  Hawkeye  State  for  many  years.  After  having 
made  good  use  of  the  advantages  afforded  in  the  public  schools, 
Louis  A.  Howard  became  actively  associated  with  his  father's  grain 
business,  and  his  ambition  soon  led  him  to  the  determination  of 
gaining  the  broader  and  distinctly  fortifying  experience  that  the 
city  of  Chicago  offered,  as  the  world's  great  center  of  grain  com- 
merce. He  came  to  this  city  in  1896  and  here  continued  his  identi- 
fication with  the  grain  brokerage  business  until  his  removal  to  Min- 
neapolis in  1905,  as  previously  noted,  the  family  home  in  the  Min- 
nesota metropolis  being  at  1920  Knox  avenue.  In  politics  Mr. 
Howard  is  found  arrayed  as  a  stalwart  advocate  of  the  cause  of  the 
Republican  party,  and  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the 
Baptist  church.     He  wedded  Miss  Lulu  B.  Miker,  a  daughter  of 


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OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO 


.*^cr,  of  Webster,  Keokuk  County,  Iowa,  and  they  havt 

'—Adrian  N.  and  Robert  L. 

un  E.  Hudson. — In  connection  with  the  general  history 

(•lopment,    upbuilding   and    important   activities   of   the 

Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  it  is  specially  pleasing  that 

..i  oo  entered  also  personal  mention  of  those  who  have  been 

tied  with  the  operations  of  the  organization  and. have  been 


itial  in   its  alfairs  in   t' 
to  its  present  comma 
.f  whose   name  initiates 
ientified  with  the  grain  li... 
'h.in  a  quarter  of  a  century, 


tive  stages  of  its  advance- 
in  the  commercial  world. 
I'as    been   continuously 
..-s  ill  Chicago  for  more 
an  active  member  of  the 
is  now  Vice-President  of 
)use  of  the  Bartktt-Frazier 
i  ot  the  lirm  with  which  he  associated 
^^'   Hudson  has  in  his  makeup  naught 
'.  tendencies,  and  he  has  measured 
y  u".  ii;s  rc'-ognizcd  initiative  and  executive 
■  IS  found  in  the  important  domain  of  grain 
!)rokerage  the  best  oi  opportunities  for  personal  advancement  and 
for  the  achieving  of  both  success  and  a  reputation  that  is  in  itself 
a  distinct  commercial  and  individual  asset.     He  has  given  loyal 
and  effective  service  in  connection  with  the  governmental  affairs 
and  )(iR.-!nn:i'   pi-ivitits  ■ .»'  tli-^  T^oanl   of  Trade,  of  which  he  is 

:  a  term  of  three  years, 

'      served  as 

the  Board. 

ly  and   almost  exclusively 

,-A  a  position  of  recognized 

Mr.  Hudson  is  direct,  earnest 

tnce   to 

L    moved 

inwhile  he 

'■'  '  niiiers  of  the 

long  identified 

Uy  given  cons'uer- 

r.  Hudson  was  i)orn 

■  A  Howard  County,  Maryland, 

.J    na>  ..i.tcch  15,  1863,  his  parents,  Henry 

ludson.  having  been  residents  of  Maryland 

rth.     His  educational  discipline  in  boyhood 

in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  state, 

tudent  in  Rock  Hill  College.     His  initial 

lined  as  a  clerk  in  a  general  farmer-^' 

■y.   Maryland,  and   in    1884.   about   t'T" 

he  came  to  Chicap 

xkinson    Company, 


now  a 

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at 

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in  this  domain  . 

ig,    with    distmLt  and    cii 
aelight  of  publuitv.  bm 
the  goal  of  w<  ■ 

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.iiercial  ''• 


160  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

has  become  one  of  the  important  commercial  concerns  of  Chicago, 
and  of  which  specific  mention  is  made  on  other  pages  of  this  work, 
in  the  review  of  the  career  of  its  founder,  Albert  Dickinson.  With 
this  company  Mr.  Hudson  remained  five  years,  at  the  expiration  of 
which  he  identified  himself  with  the  grain  and  provision  firm  of 
William  P.  Harvey  &  Co.,  this  alliance  having  continued  during 
the  various  changes  that  have  since  occurred  and  that  have  eventu- 
ated in  the  establishing  of  the  present  important  and  influential 
grain  commission  business  of  the  Bartlett-Frazier  Company,  of 
which  he  is  Vice-President.  The  executive  office  of  which  he  is 
thus  incumbent  denotes  most  efifectively  the  efficiency  of  his  service 
in  his  chosen  field  of  business  enterprise,  and  marks  him  as  one  of 
the  representative  figures  in  the  commission  trade  in  the  western 
metropolis.  As  a  citizen  Mr.  Hudson  has  manifested  the  same 
spirit  of  loyalty  and  progressiveness  that  has  characterized  his 
career  as  a  business  man  and  as  a  valued  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade,  but  he  has  manifested  no  desire  for  political  activity  or 
public  office.  He  holds  membership  in  the  Union  League  Club 
of  Chicago,  his  pleasant  home  is  in  the  beautiful  north  shore  suburb 
of  Wilmette,  and  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Ouilmette  Country  Club, 
the  Wilmette  Men's  Club  and  the  North  Shore  Golf  Club.  On 
the  twelfth  of  November,  1891,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of 
Mr.  Hudson  to  Miss  Lucy  A.  Langston,  and  their  only  child  is 
Beatrice  M. 

Colonel  Henry  D.  Hughes.^Of  the  non-resident  members  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  there  is  none  who  in 
character,  achievement  and  business  and  civic  standing  more  clearly 
marks  with  distinction  this  great  commercial  organization  of  the 
western  metropolis  than  does  Colonel  Henry  Douglas  Hughes,  of 
the  well  known  and  representative  Philadelphia  firm  of  Hughes  & 
Dier,  bankers  and  brokers.  The  firm  maintains  its  Philadelphia 
offices  in  the  fine  building  owned  by  Colonel  Hughes  at  1435  Walnut 
street ;  the  firm's  office  in  New  York  is  under  the  direct  management 
of  Dr.  E.  D.  Dier,  the  junior  member  of  the  firm,  and  at  Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania,  a  branch  office  is  maintained  in  the  Woolworth 
Building.  Colonel  Hughes  is  one  of  the  oldest  and  most  influential 
members  of  the  Philadelphia  Stock  Exchange,  and  has  been  an 
appreciative  and  valued  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade 
since  1916.  Colonel  Hughes  is  the  scion  of  one  of  the  old  and 
patrician  families  of  America,  and  of  equal  distinction  is  the  lineage 
on  the  distaflf  side.  He  was  born  in  the  city  of  Philadelphia,  Penn- 
sylvania, on  the  nineteenth  of  April,  1869,  and  is  a  son  of  Colonel 
William  Henry  Harrison  Hughes  and  Eleanor  (Carroll)  Hughes, 
the  latter  of  whom  was  born  and  reared  in  Baltimore,  Maryland, 
a  granddaughter  of  Charles  Carroll  of  Carrollton,  one  of  the  most 
influential  of  the  patriots  who  signed  that  great  American  docu- 
ment,  the   Declaration   of   Independence.      The   father  of   Colonel 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  161 

Hughes  was  a  colonel  of  a  Pennsylvania  regiment  in  the  Civil  War, 
serving  on  the  staff  of  General  Abner  Doubleday  and  especially 
distinguishing  himself  in  the  battle  of  Gettysburg.  After  the  close 
of  the  war  Colonel  William  H.  H.  Hughes  was  prominently  men- 
tioned in  connection  with  the  Republican  nomination  for  governor 
of  Pennsylvania,  and  he  was  one  of  the  most  honored  and  influential 
citizens  of  Philadelphia  at  the  time  of  his  death.  He  was  one  of 
the  founders  of  the  Union  League,  and  was  an  intimate  personal 
friend  of  President  Lincoln.  Colonel  Henry  D.  Hughes  was 
afforded  in  his  youth  the  best  educational  advantages,  including 
those  of  Germantown  Academy,  Rugby  Academy,  at  Philadelphia, 
and  Harvard  University.  There  have  been  no  limitations  to  his 
individual  verve  and  versatility,  and  after  leaving  college  he  won 
special  prominence  in  connection  with  the  virile  sports  of  cricket, 
tennis  and  polo.  From  the  introductory  paragraph  of  an  appre- 
ciative estimate  that  was  published  a  short  time  ago  in  the  Phila- 
delphia Herald  are  taken  the  following  pertinent  extracts:  "A 
veritable  Admirable  Crichton  in  the  sense  of  possessing  an  infinite 
variety  of  accomplishments,  coupled  with  a  winning  personality 
and  a  capacity  for  doing  everything  well.  Colonel  Hughes  is  a 
notable  figure  in  the  social,  financial  and  club  life  of  Philadelphia. 
No  man  living,  perhaps,  has  been  the  intimate  friend  of  so  many 
notable  persons  in  the  realm  of  literature,  art,  science  and  states- 
manship as  Henry  Douglas  Hughes.  He  was  a  close  friend  of 
President  McKinley,  General  William  T.  Sherman,  James  Bryce — 
now  Lord  Bryce — former  American  ambassador  from  England  ;  the 
late  Dr.  S.  Wier  Mitchell,  Frederick  Harrison,  Conan  Doyle, 
Whistler  and  Alexander,  the  great  artists ;  Saint  Gaudens,  the 
sculptor;  Edwin  Booth,  Joseph  Jefferson,  Lawrence  Barrett, 
Richard  Mansfield,  Sir  Henry  Irving,  the  shining  lights  of  the  stage 
of  the  last  generation ;  and  many  other  artists,  authors  and  other 
persons  of  celebrity  in  their  respective  callings."  From  his  early 
manhood  Colonel  Hughes  has  been  a  loyal  and  influential  advocate 
and  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party,  and  he  has 
contributed  many  forceful  pamphlets  in  behalf  of  the  party  prin- 
ciples and  policies  in  the  various  national  campaigns,  the  while  he 
has  come  into  close  personal  touch  with  the  statesmen  and  other 
leaders  of  his  party.  Several  years  ago  he  was  a  candidate  for 
Congress,  and  apropos  of  his  political  activities  the  following  state- 
ment has  been  written :  "Possessing  in  a  high  degree  the  gift  of 
oratory,  he  has  been  one  of  the  most  sought  after  speakers  in 
Republican  gubernatorial  and  presidential  campaigns  in  the  past." 
Relevant  to  the  business  career  of  Colonel  Hughes  recourse  is 
again  taken  to  the  previously  mentioned  article  in  the  Herald : 
"His  business  career,  which  finds  him  now  the  head  of  the  great 
up-to-date  banking  and  stock  Ijrokerage  firm  of  Hughes  &  Dier, 
began  with  the  founding  in  this  city,  thirty-odd  years  ago,  of  the 


162  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

firm  of  Frank  F.  Bell  &  Co.,  a  New  York  stock  exchange  house. 
He  withdrew  from  the  firm  in  1900,  on  account  of  ill  health,  and 
thereafter  traveled  for  two  years.  He  afterward  entered  into  busi- 
ness life  again,  becoming  interested  in  the  filtration  and  purification 
of  water  and  contributing  a  number  of  valuable  inventions  to  this 
end,  the  same  being  now  largely  used  throughout  the  world.  He 
was  for  a  time  president  of  the  Bethlehem  City  Water  Company, 
the  Philadelphia  &  Bristol  Water  Company  and  other  water-supply 
concerns."  Colonel  Hughes  became  actively  and  prominently  iden- 
tified with  the  Pennsylvania  National  Guard  and  was  captain  of 
the  Second  City  Troop  of  Philadelphia  in  the  Spanish-American 
war.  At  the  outbreak  of  this  conflict  he  was  elected  colonel  of 
the  Twenty-second  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infantry,  a  part  of  a 
provisional  brigade  that  continued  in  service  until  the  close  of  the 
war,  and  which  President  McKinley  pronounced  to  be  one  of 
the  best  in  line  at  the  subsequent  great  peace  parade  in  Philadelphia. 
Colonel  Hughes  is  an  appreciative  and  valued  member  of  the  Penn- 
sylvania Society  of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution,  the 
Society  of  the  War  of  1812,  the  Colonial' Society  of  Pennsylvania 
and  many  other  historical  and  patriotic  orders.  Through  family 
prestige  and  personal  status  the  colonel  is  a  prominent  figure  in 
the  representative  social  and  civic  life  of  his  native  city,  and  his 
home  is  in  the  beautiful  suburb  of  Ardmore.  He  is  well  known 
as  a  collector  of  rare  books  and  Chinese  porcelains  and  prints,  and 
his  is  conceded  to  be  one  of  the  finest  private  libraries  in  the  United 
States.  He  is  identified  with  many  leading  social  organizations 
in  both  Philadelphia  and  New  York  City,  including  the  Philadelphia 
Art  Club,  the  Overbrook  Country  Club,  the  Whitemarsh  Valley 
Country  Club,  the  Lincoln  Club  and  the  Bankers'  Club  of  New 
York,  as  well  as  the  famous  Terrapin  Club,  of  which  he  has  served 
as  Vice-President.  He  is  one  of  the  most  loyal  and  progressive 
citizens  of  Philadelphia,  and  here  was  prominently  concerned  in 
the  organization  of  the  Manufacturers'  Club.  Both  he  and  his 
wife  are  zealous  communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church. 
Colonel  Hughes  was  married  to  Miss  Hannah  Curnuck,  a  daughter 
of  David  Curnuck,  and  representative  of  a  well  known  and  influ- 
ential family  in  England.  Mrs.  Hughes  is  the  gracious  and  popular 
chatelaine  of  the  beautiful  family  home  and  is  a  leader  in  the  social 
activities  of  Ardmore  and  Philadelphia. 

Charles  H.  Hulburd.— Though  he  claims  the  old  Empire  State 
of  the  Union  as  the  place  of  his  nativity,  Charles  Henry  Hulburd 
exemplifies  most  fully  the  progressive  spirit  that  has  significantly 
dominated  and  denoted  the  great  western  portion  of  our  national 
domain,  and  he  is  consistently  to  be  termed  one  of  the  vigorous 
captains  of  industry,  capitalists  and  men  of  aiTairs  of  the  city  of 
Chicago.  Though  he  carefully  prepared  himself  for  the  legal  pro- 
fession and  gained  definite  prestige  in  the  same  as  a  young  man, 


IK 


ns 


/' 


'^y._A4^X. 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  163 

he  has  found  in  the  vital  world  of  business  the  field  of  activity  in 
which  he  has  gained  large  and  noteworthy  success  and  precedence. 
He  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  representative  grain  commission 
firm  of  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Chandler,  which  has  influential  and 
impregnable  position  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago, 
and  aside  from  the  interests  thus  represented  he  has  large  and 
important  capitalistic  investments  which  make  him  clearly  entitled 
to  the  distinction  involved  in  the  term  captain  of  industry.  Mr. 
Hulburd  is  President  of  that  great  corporation,  the  Elgin  National 
Watch  Company,  of  which  executive  office  he  has  been  the  incum- 
bent since  1898,  and  he  is  a  director  of  each  of  the  following  named 
and  important  Chicago  corporations :  The  Illinois  Trust  &  Savings 
Bank,  the  Corn  Exchange  National  Bank  and  the  Union  Special 
Machine  Company.  The  membership  of  Mr.  Hulburd  on  the  Board 
of  Trade  dates  from  the  year  1878,  and  he  is  one  of  the  sterling, 
progressive  and  public-spirited  citizens  who  are  contributing  to 
the  upholding  of  the  fine  morale  and  high  civic  ideals  for  which 
this  great  commercial  body  has  ever  stood  sponsor.  Charles  H. 
Hulburd  was  born  at  Stockholm,  St.  Lawrence  County,  New  York, 
on  the  twenty-eighth  of  May,  1850,  and  is  a  son  of  Hiram  and 
Amelia  (Culver)  Hulburd.  After  due  prelimniary  discipline 
acquired  in  the  public  schools,  Mr.  Hulburd  was  matriculated  in 
Oberlin  College,  at  Oberlin,  Ohio,  and  from  this  institution  he  was 
graduated  in  1871,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  His  defi- 
nite ambition  at  this  period  in  his  career  was  to  prepare  himself 
for  the  legal  profession,  and  accordingly  he  entered  the  law  depart- 
ment of  the  University  of  New  York,  in  which  he  completed  the 
prescribed  curriculum  and  from  which  he  received  in  1873  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws,  with  virtually  concomitant  admission 
to  the  bar.  In  the  same  year  he  established  his  residence  in  Chicago, 
where  he  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession,  in  which  his 
novitiate  was  attended  with  worthy  success.  After  about  two 
years  of  practice,  however,  he  turned  his  attention  to  the  grain 
commission  business,  in  which  he  became  associated  with  his 
maternal  uncles,  the  late  Charles  E.  and  George  N.  Culver,  of  the 
firm  of  Culver  &  Co.  He  maintained  this  alliance  until  1888,  and 
from  that  year  forward  until  1893  he  was  found  broadening  his 
mental  horizon  and  gaining  recreation  and  profit  through  travel 
in  Europe.  In  the  year  that  marked  the  opening  of  the  World's 
Columbian  Exposition  in  Chicago  Mr.  Hulburd  here  resumed  his 
activities  in  the  grain  commission  trade,  of  which  he  has  become 
one  of  the  prominent  and  influential  representatives.  In  1893  he 
eflfected  the  organization  of  the  firm  of  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Co., 
the  title  of  which  was  later  changed  to  the  present  form,  Hulburd, 
Warren  &  Chandler.  Other  interested  principals  of  the  concern 
are  individually  mentioned  on  other  pages  of  this  publication.  Mr. 
Hulburd  stands  forth  as  one  of  the  loyal  and  vital  men  of  affairs  of 


164  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Chicago,  and  pays  unfaltering  allegiance  to  the  great  metropolis 
of  the  West,  where  he  has  gained  and  retained  the  staunchest  of 
friends  in  both  business  and  social  circles.  He  holds  membership 
in  the  following  named  civic  organizations  of  representative  order : 
The  Chicago,  the  Union  League,  the  City,  the  University,  the 
Commercial,  the  Saddle  &  Cycle,  the  Onwentsia  and  the  South 
Shore  Country  clubs.  On  the  third  of  February,  1880,  Mr.  Hulburd 
wedded  Miss  Anna  R.  Belknap,  of  Chicago,  and  she  was  summoned 
to  eternal  rest  on  the  15th  of  February,  1906,  the  two  surviving 
children  being  Anna  R.,  who  is  the  wife  of  Hugh  McB.  Johnston, 
and  DeForest,  who  married  Miss  Marie  Hessert. 

Charles  T.  Hulburd. — The  values  and  the  futilities  of  life  are 
not  to  be  gauged  merely  by  the  lapse  of  years,  for  large  and  worthy 
achievement  is  often  compassed  by  a  man  who  is  called  from  the 
stage  of  his  mortal  endeavors  while  still  in  the  full  flush  of  vigorous 
youth,  his  labors  having  won  a  fruition  that  as  fully  justified  his 
being  as  though  he  had  been  permitted  to  round  out  the  scriptural 
span  of  three  score  years  and  ten.  The  consistency  of  this  statement 
was  significantly  demonstrated  in  the  character  and  accomplishment 
of  the  late  Charles  Tilden  Hulburd,  who  was  but  thirty  years  of  age 
at  the  time  of  his  death,  but  who  had  made  a  distinct  impress  as  a 
young  man  of  sterling  attributes,  of  vigorous  purpose  and  of  clear 
and  worthy  success-proclivities.  Much  is  implied  when  there  can  be 
offered  as  gracious  an  estimate  as  that  given  by  one  of  the  close  and 
valued  friends  of  Mr.  Hulburd  when  the  latter  was  summoned  to  the 
life  eternal  and  which  is  worthy  of  perpetuation  in  this  memoir : 
"Everybody  who  knew  Mr.  Hulburd  loved  him.  I  never  knew  a 
man  of  whom  more  good  words  could  be  said  or  who  had  more  loyal 
friends.  We  thought  he  was  healthy,  active  and  vigorous  and  would 
live  a  long  time.  He  was  taken  ill  on  December  17,  1916,  and  sub- 
sequently his  illness  became  alarming.  The  doctors  said  brain 
fever  had  developed  and  in  a  short  time  death  came.  One  of  the 
things  in  the  world  of  trade  that  attracted  great  attention  to  him 
was  his  ability  to  prepare  market  letters.  His  judgment  was  al- 
most unerring  in  his  perspective  of  the  markets."  Mr.  Hulburd 
was  a  vital  and  popular  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  at  the  time 
of  his  death,  which  occurred  December  22,  1916,  as  the  direct  sequel 
of  a  complication  of  diphtheria  and  scarlet  fever.  With  character- 
istic earnestness  and  receptivity,  he  had  made  the  best  use  of  the 
opportunities  afforded  him  in  connection  with  the  grain  commission 
business  and  the  operations  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  for  about 
one  year  prior  to  his  demise  he  had  been  floor  manager  for  the  well- 
known  Board  of  Trade  firm  of  Shearson,  Hammill  &  Co.  He  was 
identified  with  the  grain  trade  in  Chicago  during  virtually  his  entire 
business  career,  and  had  gained  specially  wide  and  valuable  expe- 
rience through  his  association  with  the  representative  firm  of  Hul- 
burd,  Warren   &   Chandler.     Concerning   him   the   following  per- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  165 

tinent  and  gracious  words  have  been  written  by  one  specially 
familiar  with  his  character  and  achievement :  "Charles  Hulburd 
was  recognized  as  one  of  the  brightest  and  most  promising  men 
among  the  younger  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  He  had  dis- 
tinct business  ability  along  with  tireless  energy  and  ambition.  But 
his  interests  were  not  confined  to  business  success,  for  he  had  a 
warm  appreciation  of  the  finer  things  of  life  and  was  a  sympathetic 
enthusiast  for  every  good  cause."  Charles  Tilden  Hulburd  was  born 
at  Hiawatha,  Kansas,  on  the  24th  of  September,  1885,  and  was  the 
only  son  of  Oscar  T.  Hulburd,  who  later  became  one  of  the  promi- 
nent and  influential  grain  brokers  of  Chicago,  as  a  member  of  the 
firm  of  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Chandler,  which  has  consistent  repre- 
sentation on  other  pages  of  this  publication.  Mr.  Hulburd  was  a 
boy  at  the  time  of  the  family  removal  to  Chicago,  where  he  made 
good  use  of  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools  of  Woodlawn  and 
of  the  University  High  School.  In  the  earlier  part  of  his  business 
career  he  was  in  the  employ  of  various  firms,  but  the  major  part  of 
his  experience  in  the  grain  trade  was  gained  during  his  active  and 
effective  association  with  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Chandler,  with  which 
he  continued  his  connection  until  he  assumed  the  position  of  floor 
manager  on  the  Board  of  Trade  for  the  firm  of  Shearson,  Hammill 
&  Co.,  which  incumbency  he  retained  during  the  final  year  of  his 
life.  His  course  was  guided  and  governed  by  the  high  principles 
and  his  fine  sense  of  personal  stewardship  found  exemplification  in 
all  the  relations  of  life,  so  that  he  not  only  received  but  fully  merited 
the  confidence  and  esteem  in  which  he  was  uniformly  held.  He  was 
an  active  and  most  popular  member  of  the  Chicago  Athletic  Associ- 
ation and  also  of  the  South  Shore  Country  Club — a  young  man 
whose  genial  personality  and  sterling  character  gained  and  retained 
to  him  the  staunchest  of  friends  in  both  business  and  social  circles. 
Edward  S.  Hunter. — He  whose  name  initiates  this  paragraph 
has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago  nearly  all  his  life,  and  here  his  early 
educational  advantages  were  those  afforded  in  the  public  schools. 
He  was  born  in  the  city  of  Lockport,  New  York,  on  the  fourth 
of  October,  1861,  and  is  a  son  of  James  W.  and  Sarah  C.  Hunter. 
Mr.  Hunter  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago  in  May,  1884,  a  few  months  prior  to  his  twenty-third 
birthday  anniversary,  and  during  the  long  intervening  years  he  has 
been  known  as  a  careful  and  successful  trader  and  he  has  become 
one  of  the  substantial  exponents  of  the  grain  commission  business 
in  Chicago,  his  operations  being  mainly  confined  to  the  corn  trade, 
in  which  he  has  become  a  recognized  authority,  his  business  being 
conducted  in  an  independent  way.  As  a  youth  Mr.  Hunter  was 
for  three  years  in  the  employ  of  the  Pullman  Palace  Car  Company, 
and  his  initial  association  in  connection  with  the  grain  brokerage 
business  was  with  the  firm  of  M.  S.  Nichols  &  Co.,  with  which  he 
continued  his  alliance  six  years.    Thereafter  he  was  connected  with 


166  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

the  firm  of  William  Young  &  Co.,  and  later  with  that  of  R.  W. 
Dunham  &  Co.  for  several  years,  both  of  these  having  been  promi- 
nent concerns  represented  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  His  long  and 
varied  experience  and  distinctive  executive  ability  have  made  Mr. 
Hunter  one  of  the  prominent  and  influential  figures  in  the  corn 
trade,  of  which  he  has  become  one  of  the  leading  independent 
traders  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  Mr.  Hunter  maintains  active  affili- 
ation with  the  South  Shore  Country  and  the  Midlothian  Country 
Clubs,  representative  organizations  of  Chicago,  besides  which  he 
holds  membership  in  the  Midwick  Country  Club  at  Pasadena,  Cali- 
fornia, and  the  Bolsa  Chica  Gun  Club  of  Los  Angeles,  that  state, 
he  and  his  family  customarily  passing  the  winter  seasons  in  Cali- 
fornia. Both  he  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Protestant 
Episcopal  church.  On  the  third  of  September,  1884,  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Hunter  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Mailers,  and  they 
have  two  children — Helen  and  Robert  E. 

Charles  E.  Hvmtting. — It  is  pleasing  to  record  that  on  the 
membership  rolls  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  is  represented 
one  of  the  pioneer  concerns  of  the  great  grain  commerce  of  the 
West,  he  whose  name  begins  this  paragraph  being  president  of 
the  Huntting  Elevator  Company,  which  maintains  its  office  head- 
quarters at  904  Flour  Exchange  Building,  in  the  city  of  Minne- 
apolis, and  which  controls  a  substantial  business  that  was  founded 
in  1860  by  the  honored  father  of  Charles  E.  Huntting,  who  has 
represented  the  company  as  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade  since  1912.  D.  S.  Baird  is  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the 
company,  and  the  headquarters  of  the  corporation  have  been  estab- 
lished in  the  Minnesota  metropolis  since  May,  1891,  though  Mr. 
Huntting  did  not  become  a  resident  of  Minneapolis  until  June,  1911. 
The  company  operates  a  chain  of  fifty  well-equipped  elevators  on 
the  lines  of  the  Chicago,  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul,  the  Chicago  & 
Great  Western  and  the  Chicago,  Rock  Island  &  Pacific  railroads. 
The  business  includes  the  handling  of  both  grain  and  seeds,  and 
special  attention  is  given  to  the  buying  and  shipping  of  barley. 
Mr.  Huntting  was  born  in  Iowa  on  the  twenty-seventh  of  May, 
1867,  and  is  a  son  of  William  F.  and  Mary  R.  (Smith)  Huntting, 
who  were  numbered  among  the  sterling  pioneers  of  the  Hawkeye 
state.  The  father  became  one  of  the  early  exponents  of  the  grain 
business  in  the  West,  and  in  1860  founded  the  enterprise  that  has 
continuously  enlisted  the  co-operation  and  direction  of  members 
of  the  family  to  the  present  day.  so  that  the  Huntting  Elevator 
Company  consistently  perpetuates  the  family  name.  He  whose 
name  begins  this  review  gained  his  early  education  in  the  excellent 
public  schools  for  which  Iowa  has  ever  been  noted,  and  his  initial 
experience  in  the  grain  business  was  gained  under  the  direction  of 
his  father,  who  at  that  time  maintained  his  residence  and  business 
headquarters  at  McGregor,  Clayton  County,  Iowa,  a  vigorous  little 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  167 

town  on  the  Mississippi  river.  He  continued  to  be  associated 
with  his  father  in  business  until  the  death  of  his  honored  sire, 
gained  his  broad  and  accurate  knowledge  at  first  hand,  and  has 
become  a  recognized  authority  in  all  details  of  the  fundamental 
line  of  industrial  and  commercial  enterprise  of  which  he  is  now  a 
prominent  and  successful  exponent.  In  addition  to  his  appreciative 
alliance  with  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  Mr.  Huntting  is  an  active 
member  of  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Mil- 
waukee Grain  Exchange.  His  political  support  is  given  to  the 
Republican  party,  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Masonic  fraternity,  and 
in  his  home  city  he  holds  membership  in  the  Minneapolis  Athletic 
Club,  the  Minneapolis  Automobile  Club  and  the  Minneapolis  Golf 
Club,  both  he  and  his  wife  being  members  of  Plymouth  Congre- 
gational Church,  the  family  home  being  at  2208  Pleasant  avenue. 
Mr.  Huntting  wedded  Miss  Frances  L.  Lake,  now  deceased,  and 
who  is  survived  by  three  children :  Charles  E.,  Helen  E.  and 
James  G.  Mr.  Huntting  was  married  to  Miss  Charlotte  M.  Lake, 
a  sister  of  his  first  wife,  and  she  is  the  gracious  and  popular  chate- 
laine of  their  pleasant  home.     They  have  no  children. 

Charles  L.  Hutchinson. — By  reason  of  the  activities  and  wide 
influence  of  his  father,  the  late  Benjamin  P.  Hutchinson,  in  con- 
nection with  the  operations  and  progressive  history  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  the  name  borne  by  him  whose 
name  initiates  this  review  has  become  a  very  part  of  the  traditions 
of  this  great  commercial  body,  which  has  never  claimed  on  its  list 
of  members  a  more  original,  assertive  and  individual  character 
than  the  late  Benjamin  P.  Hutchinson,  without  appreciative  recog- 
nition of  whom  the  history  of  the  Board  of  Trade  can  not  be  con- 
sistently written.  He  was  a  pioneer  member  of  the  Board  and 
he  gave  to  its  affairs,  to  its  development  and  upbuilding  the  splendid 
resources  of  his  unique  personality,  his  influence  and  his  achieve- 
ment, having  been  such  as  to  gain  to  him  wide  reputation  and  to 
make  his  activities,  always  positive  and  direct,  a  very  part  of  the 
history  of  Chicago  itself — a  city  that  may  well  pay  to  his  name 
and  memory  a  lasting  tribute  of  honor.  Under  such  conditions  it 
has  been  splendidly  consistent  to  find  that  the  son,  Charles  L. 
Hutchinson,  has  not  only  been  an  active  and  influential  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  city  which  has  been  his  home  from  child- 
hood, but  has  also  played  a  large  part  in  the  civic  life  of  Chicago, 
especially  in  connection  with  those  things  that  represent  the  finer 
civic  ideals.  He  has  been  an  influential  member  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  and  has  served  as  its  President,  but  his  activities  as  a  member 
have  been  abated  in  later  years,  owing  to  the  exigent  demands 
placed  upon  his  attention  by  his  large  and  varied  capitalistic  in- 
terests, his  executive  duties  in  connection  with  other  business 
affairs  of  broad  scope  and  importance,  and  his  many  responsibilities 
pertinent  to  his  secure  status  as  one  of  the  liberal,  progressive  and 


168  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

public-spirited  citizens  of  the  western  metropolis  and  his  active 
connection  with  civic  institutions  and  other  organizations  closely 
touching  the  social  and  economic  welfare.  Mr.  Hutchinson  gives 
not  a  little  of  his  time  to  his  administrative  duties  as  Vice-President 
of  the  Corn  Exchange  National  Bank,  of  which  representative  finan- 
cial institution  he  was  formerly  President,  an  office  from  which  he 
withdrew  on  account  of  the  insistent  exigencies  of  other  demands 
placed  upon  him.  He  has  long  been  a  leader  in  the  financial  activi- 
ties of  Chicago  and  he  has  not  abated  by  one  jot  or  tittle  his  loyal 
allegiance  to  the  Board  of  Trade,  as  an  honored  member  of  which 
it  is  gratifying  to  be  able  to  accord  him  recognition  in  this  publica- 
tion. Charles  Lawrence  Hutchinson  was  born  at  Lynn,  Massachu- 
setts, on  the  7th  of  March,  1854,  and  is  a  son  of  Benjamin  P.  and 
Sarah  (Ingalls)  Hutchinson,  who  established  their  home  in  Chicago 
in  1856,  when  he  was  a  child  of  about  two  years.  In  the  public 
schools  of  the  embryonic  metropolis  Mr.  Hutchinson  continued  his 
studies  until  he  had  completed  the  curriculum  of  the  old  Chicago 
high  school,  in  which  he  was  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of 
1873.  The  broad  culture  that  denotes  the  man  at  the  present  day 
has  been  the  result  of  judicious  study  and  reading  and  there  came  a 
fitting  recognition  of  his  intellectual  attainments,  his  activities  as 
a  patron  of  art  and  his  distinctive  civic  loyalty  and  liberality  when 
he  received,  in  1901,  the  honorary  degree  of  Master  of  Arts,  from 
Tufts  College  and  the  same  degree  from  Harvard  University  in 
1916.  In  his  youth  Mr.  Hutchinson  became  associated  with  the 
grain  commmission  trade,  in  which  he  gained  his  training  under 
the  able  direction  of  his  father  and  of  which  he  eventually  became 
one  of  the  leading  exponents  in  Chicago  and  on  the  Board  of  Trade. 
His  exceptional  executive  powers  have  in  later  years  been  signifi- 
cantly exemplified  in  connection  with  important  banking  interests 
in  Chicago,  where,  as  already  stated,  he  is  now  Vice-President  of 
the  Corn  Exchange  National  Bank.  He  is  a  Director  of  the  North- 
ern Trust  Company  and  has  other  important  capitalistic  interests  of 
varied  order.  Mr.  Hutchinson's  activities  in  connection  with  civic 
afifairs  of  what  may  be  termed  a  semi-public  nature  have  been  spe- 
cially benignant  and  diversified  and  have  marked  him  as  one  of 
the  most  loyal  and  liberal  citizens  of  Chicago.  He  was  a  director 
and  chairman  of  the  Fine  Arts  Commission  of  the  World's  Colum- 
bian Exposition,  which  gave  to  Chicago  a  prestige  and  distinction 
never  before  commanded ;  and  for  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century 
he  has  served  most  loyally  and  effectively  as  President  of  the  Art 
Institute  of  Chicago,  one  of  the  city's  proudest  institutions.  He  is 
President  of  the  Chicago  Orphan  Asylum,  is  Treasurer  of  the  great 
University  of  Chicago,  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the 
Presbyterian  Hospital,  and  he  served  four  terms  as  President  of  the 
General  Conventions  of  the  Universalist  church,  of  which  he  is  an 
active    and    influential   member.      Public    afifairs    in    Chicago    have 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  169 

gained  his  valued  and  effective  co-operation  by  his  service  as  Treas- 
urer of  the  Sanitary  District  of  Chicago  and  as  a  member  of  the 
South  Park  Commission.  In  the  domain  of  art,  in  which  his  talent 
is  of  appreciative  rather  than  creative  order,  Mr.  Hutchinson  has 
become  influential  aside  from  his  administration  as  chief  executive 
of  the  Art  Institute  of  Chicago.  He  is  an  honorary  member  of  the 
American  Institute  of  Architects,  is  Treasurer  of  the  national  organ- 
ization known  as  the  Municipal  Art  League,  is  President  of  the 
American  Federation  of  Arts,  and  is  Vice-President  of  the  Egypt 
Exploration  Fund.  Among  the  more  prominent  of  the  representa- 
tive social  organizations  with  which  he  is  identified  may  be  men- 
tioned the  Chicago,  the  Union  League,  the  Chicago  Atheletic,  the 
University,  the  Clifif  Dwellers,  the  Quadrangle,  the  Commercial  and 
the  Caxton  Clubs.  In  the  year  1881  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of 
Mr.  Hutchinson  to  Miss  Frances  Kinsley,  daughter  of  the  late  Her- 
bert M.  Kinsley,  of  Chicago.    They  have  no  children. 

Dudley  M.  Irwin. — Dudley  M.  Irwin  has  been  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  since  1904,  but  his  activities 
as  a  prominent  and  successful  representative  of  the  cash  and  gen- 
eral commission  trade  in  grain  have  covered  a  period  of  nearly 
forty  years.  His  office  headquarters  are  maintained  in  the  Chamber 
of  Commerce  building,  Buffalo,  New  York ;  the  year  1917  finds  him 
giving  effective  service  as  Vice-President  of  the  Buffalo  Corn  Ex- 
change ;  and  he  also  holds  membership  in  the  New  York  Produce 
Exchange.  In  the  national  metropolis  he  maintains  a  branch  office 
at  220  Eighth  street,  and  through  it  is  able  greatly  to  facilitate  his 
broad  operations  in  the  commission  business.  Mr.  Irwin  is  dis- 
tinctly one  of  the  prominent  figures  in  the  grain  and  provision  com- 
merce of  the  Empire  state  and  finds  the  privileges  of  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade  of  great  value  to  him,  his  standing  as  a  citizen  and 
man  of  affairs  making  especially  consistent  and  gratifying  his 
recognition  in  this  history.  The  only  child  of  Dudley  M.  and  Mary 
(Miller)  Irwin,  Dudley  M.  Irwin,  Jr.,  the  immediate  subject  of  this 
review,  was  born  at  Otsego,  New  York,  June  10,  1860,  and  his 
parents  likewise  were  natives  of  New  York  state,  the  father  having 
been  a  miller  by  vocation  and  having  died  in  1859,  a  short  time  prior 
to  the  birth  of  his  only  child.  After  having  duly  profited  by  the 
advantages  of  the  public  schools  Mr.  Irwin  entered  college  and  was 
graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1880,  with  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  the  same  year  he  began  his  practical  experi- 
ence in  the  grain  business,  with  which  he  has  continued  to  be 
identified  during  the  long  intervening  years  and  in  which  he  has 
achieved  substantial  and  worthy  success.  In  politics  Mr.  Irwin  is 
aligned  as  a  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party,  as  a 
citizen  he  is  liberal  and  public-spirited,  though  never  a  seeker  of 
public  office ;  both  he  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Prot- 
estant Episcopal  church ;  and  the  pleasant  family  home  in  Buffalo 


170  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

is  situated  at  316  Sumner  street.  Mr.  Irwin  is  a  member  of  the 
Buffalo  Club,  the  Buffalo  Country  Club,  and  the  University  and 
Grolier  Clubs  of  New  York  city.  Mr.  Irwin  was  married  to  Miss 
Jennie  Marsh,  a  daughter  of  William  Marsh,  who  was  a  well  known 
citizen  of  the  state  of  New  Jersey.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Irwin  have  four 
children, — Florence  H.,  Dudley  M.  Ill,  Katherine  P.  and  Quina- 
har  R. 

Harold  DeWitt  Irwin. — In  his  native  city  of  Philadelphia  Mr. 
Irwin  has  won  for  himself  distinct  success  and  prestige  as  a  repre- 
sentative of  the  grain  commission  business,  with  which  he  has 
there  been  identified  since  1892,  and  in  connection  with  which  he  is 
now  a  member  of  the  well  known  brokerage  firm  of  L.  G.  Graff  & 
Sons,  with  offices  at  304  Bourse  building,  the  other  member  of  the 
firm  being  L.  G.  Graff.  The  firm  has  membership  in  the  Phila- 
delphia Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Philadelphia  Board  of  Trade, 
and  the  New  York  Produce  Exchange,  and  Mr.  Irwin  has  repre- 
sented the  concern  as  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade 
since  1904.  Harold  DeWitt  Irwin  was  born  in  Philadelphia  on  the 
1st  of  January,  1877,  one  of  the  two  children  of  George  M.  and 
Lucy  (Graff)  Irwin,  his  father  having  been  a  well  known  business 
man  and  honored  citizen  of  Philadelphia  for  many  years  prior  to  his 
death.  The  early  education  of  Mr.  Irwin  was  acquired  principally 
in  a  well  ordered  private  school  conducted  under  the  auspices  of  the 
Society  of  Friends,  and  his  entire  business  experience  has  been  in 
connection  with  the  line  of  enterprise  with  which  he  is  now  identi- 
fied. He  is  a  stalwart  Republican  in  politics,  is  affiliated  with  the 
Union  League  and  Bala  Clubs  in  his  home  city,  and  both  he  and 
his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church.  Mr. 
Irwin  was  married  to  Miss  Lillian  Wanamaker,  a  daughter  of  L.  W. 
Wanamaker,  of  Philadelphia,  and  the  one  child  of  this  union  is  a 
daughter,  Dorothy. 

Arthur  S.  Jackson. — Not  only  in  connection  with  the  operations 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  the  handling  of  a  large  volume  of  business 
in  the  grain  commission  trade  has  Arthur  Stanley  Jackson  shown 
his  initiative  and  resourcefulness,  but  he  has  also  been  identified 
with  the  lumber  trade,  in  connection  with  which  he  had  gained  dis- 
tinctive success  and  priority  previously  to  establishing  himself  in  his 
present  field  of  enterprise,  as  a  member  of  the  staunch  and  reliable 
Board  of  Trade  commission  firm  of  Jackson  Brothers  &  Co.,  in  which 
are  associated  with  him  his  four  brothers,  Darius  C,  Frank  Gilbert, 
Horace  and  Howard  B.  The  honored  father,  the  late  William  Stan- 
ley Jackson,  who  was  the  senior  member  of  this  representative  firm 
and  was  one  of  the  old  and  distinguished  members  of  the  Board  of 
Trade,  in  the  aft'airs  of  which  he  wielded  large  and  benignant  influ- 
ence and  of  which  he  served  at  one  time  as  President.  Arthur  S. 
Jackson  was  born  at  Middletown,  Orange  County,  New  York,  on  the 
"l9th  of  August,  1870,  and  is  a  son  of  William  S.  and  Ella  (Helmer) 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  171 

Jackson,  who  came  to  the  West  and  established  their  home  in  Chi- 
cago. The  father,  as  elsewhere  stated,  became  one  of  the  prominent 
and  influential  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  a  strong  and 
steadfast  figure  in  the  grain  commission  business,  of  which  he  con- 
tinued an  exponent  until  the  time  of  his  death.  In  the  public  schools 
of  Chicago  Arthur  S.  Jackson  continued  his  studies  until  he  had 
completed  the  curriculum  of  the  high  school,  and  soon  afterward  he 
became  associated  with  the  lumber  business,  in  which  connection  he 
was  employed  by  various  representative  firms  outside  of  Chicago 
from  1890  to  1896.  In  the  latter  year  he  became  one  of  the  principals 
in  the  organization  of  the  Badger  &  Jackson  Company,  which  en- 
gaged in  the  wholesale  and  retail  dealing  in  Wisconsin  lumber,  with 
yards  at  Green  Bay  and  Rhinelander,  Wisconsin.  Of  this  corpora- 
tion, which  developed  a  large  and  prosperous  business,  Mr.  Jackson 
continued  to  serve  as  Secretary  and  Treasurer  until  1905,  when  he 
engaged  in  the  stock  and  grain  commission  business  in  Chicago,  as 
a  member  of  the  present  representative  firm  of  Jackson  Brothers  & 
Co.  He  simultaneously  assumed  a  seat  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  and 
has  since  been  an  active  and  popular  member  of  this  great  commer- 
cial body.  Mr.  Jackson  gives  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party, 
and  holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic,  the  Kenwood  and  the 
South  Shore  Country  Clubs.  On  the  19th  of  November,  1895,  was 
solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Jackson  to  Miss  Louise  Burkhardt, 
and  they  have  one  son — Arthur  Stanley,  Jr. 

Joseph  F.  Jackson. — Since  the  year  1895  the  name  of  Joseph 
Frederick  Jackson  has  been  inscribed  on  the  membership  rolls  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  he  has  been  a  promi- 
nent and  influential  figure  in  connection  with  its  affairs  and  its  gen- 
eral functional  activities.  Through  the  judicious  application  of  his 
powers  he  has  won  advancement  from  the  position  of  telegraph 
operator  to  that  of  Secretary  of  the  Purity  Oats  Company,  one  of 
the  important  corporations  represented  on  the  Board  of  Trade  and 
one  of  distinctive  prestige  in  connection  with  the  commercial  and 
industrial  status  of  Chicago.  Mr.  Jackson  was  born  at  Strathroy, 
Province  of  Ontario,  Canada,  on  the  6th  of  November,  1864,  and 
is  a  son  of  Peter  Walker  Jackson  and  Elizabeth  (Spears)  Jackson. 
He  was  reared  in  his  native  province  and  gained  his  early  educa- 
tion in  the  public  schools  of  Strathroy,  Toronto  and  Sarnia.  At  the 
age  of  fourteen  years  Mr.  Jackson  began  a  practical  apprenticeship 
in  acquiring  the  art  and  trade  of  telegraphist,  and  after  becoming  a 
competent  operator  he  served  as  such  and  as  train  dispatcher  for 
various  railroads  and  in  the  employ  of  the  Western  Union  Tele- 
graph Company.  He  has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago  since  1890,  and 
his  initial  association  with  the  affairs  of  the  Board  of  Trade  was  in 
the  capacity  of  telegraph  operator  in  the  board  offices  of  the  West- 
ern Union  Telegraph  Company.  His  ambition  and  ability  gradually 
led  him  into  a  broader  sphere  of  acti\ity  and  he  eventually  became 


172  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

known  as  one  of  the  resourceful  and  specially  well  informed  traders 
of  the  great  commercial  body  of  which  he  became  a  member  in 
1895.  On  the  Board  of  Trade  Mr.  Jackson  has  served  as  floor  man- 
ager for  various  representative  commission  firms,  including  E.  L. 
Brewster  &  Company;  Schwartz,  Dupee  &  Company;  John  H. 
Wrenn  &  Company;  and  Shearson,  Hammill  &  Company.  In  De- 
cember, 1915,  he  was  made  secretary  of  the  Purity  Oats  Company, 
and  he  has  since  given  his  time  and  attention  principally  to  the 
executive  duties  imposed  upon  him  in  this  responsible  post  and  to 
representing  this  important  corporation  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  Mr. 
Jackson  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  Mutual  Benefit  Asso- 
ciation and  of  the  Royal  League,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  active 
members  of  Plymouth  Congregational  church.  On  the  28th  of 
October,  1901,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Jackson  to  Miss 
Florence  Howard,  and  they  have  three  children, — Howard  Walker, 
Joseph  Frederick,  Jr.,  and  Ruth  DeEtte. 

William  C.  Jackson. — As  a  banker  and  a  broker  in  stock,  grain, 
cotton  and  provisions,  Mr.  Jackson  has  achieved  definite  success  and 
precedence  in  his  native  city,  where  he  is  associated  in  business  with 
David  A.  Noyes,  under  the  firm  name  of  Noyes  &  Jackson.  Both 
of  the  principals  in  this  representative  firm  hold  membership  on  the 
Board  of  Trade  and  of  Mr.  Noyes  individual  mention  is  made  on 
other  pages  of  this  work.  William  C.  Jackson  was  born  in  Chicago 
on  the  6th  of  May,  1875,  a  son  of  William  S.  and  Ella  (Helmer) 
Jackson,  and  that  in  the  formative  period  of  his  character-building 
he  breathed  deeply  of  the  progressive  spirit  that  animates  his  na- 
tive city  has  been  shown  forth  conclusively  in  his  career  as  a  busi- 
ness man  and  in  his  loyalty  to  Chicago  and  all  that  the  great  metro- 
polis represents  in  civic  and  commercial  ideals.  He  is  indebted  to 
the  public  schools  for  his  early  educational  discipline,  and  he  has 
been  identified  with  his  present  line  of  business  enterprise  since 
1905,  the  firm  of  Noyes  &  Jackson  having  built  up  a  substantial 
commission  business  of  the  utmost  legitimacy  and  of  constantly 
cumulative  tendency.  Mr.  Jackson  has  been  an  active  and  apprecia- 
tive member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  1903,  and  holds  member- 
ship also  in  the  Chicago  Association  of  Commerce,  of  the  progres- 
sive civic  and  business  policies  of  which  he  is  a  loyal  supporter. 
His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  Republican  party,  and  he 
holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association  and  the 
Exmoor  Country  Club.  On  the  27th  of  December,  1899,  was  re- 
corded the  marriage  of  Mr.  Jackson  to  Miss  Martha  Olive  Weeks, 
of  Chicago,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Eleanor. 

William  S.  Jackson. — For  nearly  forty  years  the  late  William  S. 
Jackson  was  a  vigorous,  honored  and  influential  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  his  was  the  distinction 
of  having  served  as  its  president  in  1903  and  1904,  his  able  admin- 
istration having  fully  justified  the  honor  thus  conferred  upon  him 


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OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  173 

by  his  appreciative  fellow  members.  It  was  his  to  achieve  sub- 
stantial success  as  a  representative  of  the  grain  commission  busi- 
ness in  the  western  metropolis,  and  that  success  was  won  by  worthy 
and  legitimate  means,  as  his  course  in  life  was  ever  guided  and  gov- 
erned by  the  highest  principles  of  integrity  and  honor  and  he  fully 
merited  the  confidence  and  esteem  that  were  uniformly  reposed  in 
him.  He  was  the  virtual  founder  of  the  large  and  important  com- 
mission business  that  is  still  continued  by  his  brother,  Howard  B., 
and  his  son,  Arthur  S.,  under  the  firm  title  of  Jackson  Brothers  & 
Company,  and  it  is  most  gratifying  to  record  that  as  public-spirited 
citizens  and  alert  and  progressive  business  men  these  two  are  well 
upholding  the  prestige  of  the  family  name.  Mr.  Jackson  continued 
his  active  identification  with  the  Board  of  Trade  from  1876  to  the 
time  of  his  death,  and  he  was  summoned  to  eternal  rest  on  the  18th 
of  November,  1914,  a  man  of  strength  of  purpose  and  of  the  finest 
civic  and  business  ideals.  William  S.  Jackson  was  born  at  Adrian, 
the  judicial  center  of  Lenawee  county,  Michigan,  on  the  4th  of 
December,  1841,  and  this  date  indicates  beyond  peradventure  that 
his  parents  were  numbered  among  the  pioneers  of  that  section  of 
the  Wolverine  state.  In  his  youth  Mr.  Jackson  received  excellent 
educational  advantages  as  guaged  by  the  standards  of  the  locality 
and  period,  and  his  higher  academic  training  was  acquired  in  the 
University  of  Wisconsin,  at  Madison.  His  father  served  as  a  sheriff 
in  Wisconsin,  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  War,  and  incidentally  he  him- 
self was  enabled  to  gain  youthful  experience  in  the  position  of 
deputy  sheriff  under  his  honored  sire.  In  1875  Mr.  Jackson,  as  a 
young  man  of  thirty-four  years,  came  to  Chicago,  and  in  the  follow- 
ing year  he  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  through  the 
medium  of  which  he  was  destined  to  gain  marked  precedence  and 
success  as  an  influential  exponent  of  the  commission  business  in 
grain.  His  broad  views  and  well  fortified  opinions  made  him  for 
many  years  one  of  the  leaders  in  the  governmental  affairs  and  gen- 
eral functional  activities  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  but  to  the  public  in 
general  he  became  better  known  for  his  civic  loyalty  and  public 
spirit  and  for  his  active  association  with  railway  construction.  In 
1896  he  was  elected  to  represent  the  old  Third  ward  of  Chicago  on 
the  board  of  aldermen,  and  of  this  position  he  continued  the  vigor- 
ous, faithful  and  valued  incumbent  for  a  period  of  eight  years.  His 
unfaltering  loyalty  was  manifested  in  his  earnest  support  of  mea- 
sures tending  to  advance  the  general  welfare  of  the  city  of  its  peo- 
ple, and  he  was  specially  zealous  in  the  advocacy  of  the  important 
policy  of  effecting  the  elevation  of  railroad  tracks  within  the  city 
and  in  making  municipal  provision  for  the  establishing  of  small 
parks.  His  personal  charities  and  benevolences  were  unceasing  and 
invariably  marked  by  unostentatious  and  kindly  zeal,  besides  which 
he  was  for  many  years  a  director  of  the  United  Charities  of  Chicago. 


174  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

His  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  Republican  party  and  his 
religious  faith  was  that  of  the  Presbyterian  church. 

Fred  W.  Jaeger. — By  very  reason  of  its  topical  situation  and 
commercial  importance  the  city  of  Toledo  figures  as  an  important 
center  and  shipping  point  in  connection  with  the  grain  trade,  and 
of  the  concerns  there  having  prominent  status  and  important  in- 
fluence in  this  field  of  enterprise  is  that  of  J.  F.  Zahm  &  Company, 
in  which  the  executive  principals  are  Fred  Mayer  and  Fred  W. 
Jaeger,  the  latter  of  whom  became  an  active  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  upon  the  death  of  the  senior  mem- 
ber of  his  firm,  J.  F.  Zahm,  who  passed  from  the  stage  of  his  mortal 
endeavors  on  the  29th  of  December,  1907.  Fred  W.  Jaeger  was  born 
at  Elmore,  Ohio,  on  the  5th  of  January,  1867,  one  of  the  seven 
children  of  Godfrey  and  Mary  (Vaughn)  Jaeger,  his  father  having 
long  been  identified  with  railroad  afifairs  and  having  held  several 
dififerent  positions  of  trust  in  the  service  of  the  New  York  Central 
Railroad  Company.  He  to  whom  this  brief  review  is  dedicated  is 
indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  Ohio  for  his  early  education  and  in 
1887,  at  the  age  of  twenty  years,  he  found  employment  with  the 
firm  of  J.  F.  Zahm  &  Company,  engaged  in  the  grain  and  seed  trade 
in  Toledo.  With  this  concern  he  has  continued  during  the  inter- 
vening years  and  he  has  won  by  effective  service  his  advancement 
to  a  place  of  prominence  in  this  domain  of  commercial  enterprise 
in  Ohio  and  became  a  member  of  the  firm  in  connection  with  whose 
operations  he  gained  the  experience  that  makes  him  an  authority  in 
the  grain  business.  The  firm  has  its  well  appointed  Toledo  ofifices 
in  the  Second  National  Bank  Building,  its  principals  are  both  mem- 
bers of  the  Toledo  Produce  Exchange,  and  Mr.  Jaeger,  as  before 
noted  represents  the  concern  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  in 
Chicago,  for  which  reason  he  is  consistently  given  special  represen- 
tation in  this  history.  Mr.  Jaeger  is  liberal  and  public-spirited  in 
his  civic  attitude  but  has  never  sought  public  office  and  is  independ- 
ent in  politics,  men  and  measures  counting  more  with  him  than 
partisan  dictates.  He  is  af^liated  with  the  Masonic  fraternity  and 
the  Benevolent  &  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  wedded  Miss 
Lillian  Mclntyre,  a  daughter  of  Alonzo  W.  Mclntyre  of  Toledo. 

Edward  A.  James. — From  his  early  youth  to  the  present  time 
has  Mr.  James  been  connected  with  the  great  interests  represented 
by  Armour  &  Company,  a  concern  that  has  played  large  part  in 
giving  to  Chicago  its  industrial  and  commercial  priority.  Close 
application,  determined  eflfort  and  well  ordered  ambition  have  been 
the  forces  that  have  compassed  the  progress  of  Mr.  James  in  the 
business  world,  and  his  career  admirably  illustrates  the  ancient 
chivalric  motto,  "Qui  meruit  palmam  ferat,"  implying  that  he  who 
merits  it  shall  bear  the  palm  of  victory.  Mr.  James  is  Vice-President 
and  Secretary  of  the  Armour  Grain  Company  and  has  proved  him- 
self fully  equal  to  the  large  and  exacting  responsibilities  and  execu- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  175 

tive  demands  that  are  placed  upon  him  in  connection  with  the 
widely  disseminated  interests  of  this  important  corporation.  Ed- 
ward Arthur  James  was  born  and  reared  in  Chicago  and  the  date  of 
his  nativity  was  November  30,  1862.  He  is  a  son  of  William  and 
Aurelia  (Booth)  James,  and  his  father  was  long  and  prominently 
identified  with  business  interests  in  Chicago,  where  he  established 
his  home  at  a  time  when  the  city  gave  slight  promise  of  becoming 
a  great  metropolitan  center.  After  having  profited  duly  by  the  ad- 
vantages afforded  in  the  public  schools  of  Chicago  Mr.  James,  when 
about  eighteen  years  of  age,  entered  the  employ  of  Armour  &  Com- 
pany, and  in  this  connection  his  personal  advancement  has  kept 
pace  with  the  marvelous  progress  of  the  great  corporation.  He  be- 
came a  representative  of  the  grain  interests  of  Armour  &  Company 
about  the  year  1893,  and  has  been  a  representative  of  the  same  on 
the  Board  of  Trade  since  1898,  in  which  year  he  became  a  member  of 
this  important  commercial  organization  of  his  native  city.  In  1900 
he  became  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Armour  Grain  Company, 
and  he  has  since  retained  the  office  of  Secretary,  besides  which  he 
has  expanded  his  field  of  effective  service  by  holding  also  the  office 
of  Vice-President  of  the  company,  a  preferment  that  came  to  him 
in  1907.  Mr.  James  is  essentially  and  unreservedly  a  man  of  affairs 
and  has  had  little  time  or  inclination  for  associating  himself  with 
social  organizations.  On  the  4th  of  December,  1883.  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  James  to  Miss  Ada  Harris,  of  Chicago,  and  they 
have  two  sons,  Sydney  Vincent  and  Garrett  Bell. 

John  H.  Jones. — Within  a  period  of  thirty-five  years'  active 
identification  with  the  operations  of  the  Board  of  Trade  John 
Howard  Jones  has  been  a  prominent  and  influential  representative 
of  the  grain  commission  business  in  Chicago,  and  has  been  one  of 
the  sterling  and  popular  members  who  have  contributed  materially 
to  the  upholding  of  the  high  commercial  prestige  of  the  Board  of 
Trade,  of  which  he  served  as  a  Director  for  three  years  and  as  Vice- 
President  for  a  period  of  two  years.  He  controls  a  substantial  and 
representative  business  of  individual  order,  has  been  a  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  since  1881  and  his  experience  has  covered  a 
broad  and  effective  activity  in  connection  with  the  best  functions 
and  privileges  for  which  the  Board  stands  sponsor.  He  holds  mem- 
bership in  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club  and  the  Glenview  Golf  Club, 
and  is  one  of  the  popular  bachelors  of  the  western  metropolis,  a 
city  that  has  been  the  stage  of  his  activities  during  the  entire  period 
of  his  business  career.  John  Howard  Jones  was  born  in  the  city  of 
Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania,  on  the  14th  of  February,  1860,  is  a  son 
of  John  D.  and  Mary  E.  Jones,  and  has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago 
since  1866.  He  has  gained  through  long  and  varied  experience  an 
authoritative  knowledge  of  the  grain  trade,  and  is  one  of  the  repre- 
sentative independent  exponents  of  the  commission  business  on  the 


176  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Board  of  Trade,  with  secure  status  as  a  loyal  and  public-spirited 
citizen. 

Thomas  W.  Keelin. — A  prominent  and  progressive  figure  in  the 
hay  and  grain  trade  in  Chicago,  he  whose  name  initiates  this  para- 
graph is  the  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  T.  W.  Keelin  &  Company, 
which  maintains  its  business  headquarters  at  166-170  North  Car- 
penter street,  and  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  has  been  a 
member  since  June,  1910,  he  is  a  popular  and  influential  representa- 
tive in  the  cash  grain  trade.  Mr.  Keelin  is  a  native  son  of  Chicago 
and  in  his  business  career  he  has  signally  shown  forth  the  progres- 
sive and  vigorous  spirit  for  which  the  western  metropolis  pre- 
eminently stands  sponsor.  He  was  born  in  this  city  on  the  19th  of 
November,  1870,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Elizabeth  Keelin.  Mr. 
Keelin  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Chi- 
cago, and  in  his  early  youth  he  gained  varied  experience  in  con- 
nection with  business  activities  in  his  native  city.  He  is  distinctly 
popular  in  both  business  and  social  circles,  is  an  active  member  of 
the  Chicago  Athletic  Club,  the  Illinois  Athletic  Club,  the  Oak  Park 
Country  Club  and  the  Belmont  Golf  Club,  besides  which  he  main- 
tains affiliation  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  Both  he  and  his 
wife  are  communicants  of  the  Catholic  church.  On  the  27th  of 
November,  1897,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Keelin  to 
Miss  Alice  M.  Schoeneck,  and  they  have  three  children,  Mabel  M., 
John  W.,  and  Thomas  W.,  Jr.  Like  many  another,  who  has  attained 
to  prominence  and  distinction  in  the  business  world,  Mr.  Keelin 
made  his  start  from  humble  beginnings.  His  first  independent 
business  venture  was  made,  in  a  limited  way,  in  1892.  Under  his 
careful  and  skillful  management,  conducted  with  scrupulous  regard 
ior  the  principles  of  integrity  and  fair  dealings,  the  business  rapidly 
expanded  until  today,  the  house  of  Keelin  is  numbered  among  the 
leaders  in  the  hay  and  grain  trade  in  Chicago.  Mr.  Keelin  is  presi- 
dent of  T.  W.  Keelin  &  Company,  the  business  being  incorporated 
under  that  title,  July  1,  1916.  He  is  also  president  of  Keelin  Brothers 
&  Company,  another  corporate  concern,  dealing  in  hay  and  grain. 
He  is  president  of  the  Prairie  State  MiUing  Company,  organized 
April  1,  1915,  of  which  he  was  the  prime  mover.  He  is  president  of 
the  West  End  Storage  Warehouse  Company,  and  treasurer  of  the 
Cragin  Products  Company,  whose  well  equipped  plant  is  located  at 
Cragin,  near  Chicago,  and  in  which  he  is  a  large  stockholder.  Mr. 
Keelin  takes  an  active  and  lively  interest  in  the  affairs  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  and  in  1911  was  chosen  as  a  delegate  to  the  National  Hay 
Association.  He  possesses  in  marked  degree  a  capacity  for  achieve- 
ment and  his  success  has  come  as  the  direct  result  of  his  energy  and 
eflfort. 

Kennard  G.  Keen. — The  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago 
claims  as  one  of  its  non-resident  members  Kennard  G.  Keen,  who 
is  junior  member  of  the  substantial  banking  and   brokerage   firm 


II 


^:^JU^ 


4»  ''^» 


HE  CITY  OF  L: 


1326 


177 

Walnut 

of   this 

'be   ef- 

;aber- 

New 

Ken- 

\as  born  in  Philadelphia  on  the  11th  of  July,  1S79, 

•  ""   ability  and  endeavors  has  gained   ijrc.-,tige 

business  men  of  the  younger  genera i!',i!i 

■rd   and    Mary    (Liii:'.» 

nc   oi   the   prominent 

and  ere  his  death  ot- 


with    officfe    headquarters 

insylvania.      The  senior  r 

/:    firm   is   Walter  F.  Klc:;..  , 

formed  in  1914,  the  firm  ha^ 
h''  : ii^o  Board  of  Trade,  but  aiS'    n 
...;    he.  Philadelphia  Stock  Exchan.ait 


P 


'-  '  ow  was  graiJ 

idelphia  as  a 

id  souii  alter  ward   lu-  commenced 

,  his  advancement  since  that  time 

i  he  engaged  in  the  stock  and  bond 

I   Ill's  line  of  enterprise  he  has  since 

.e  present  firm  of  Klemm  &  Keen,  es- 

1    in    1914,    having   developed    a    substantial    banking   and 

;..    :,.. ^fje  business  which  includes  large  operations  in  the  grain 

•commission  trade.    The  firm  retains  in  connection  with  the  various 

■^  of  its  business  a  corps  of  about  twenty  employes.    Mr. 

;.tently  appreciative  of  and  loyal  to  his  native  city  and 

tjkes  deep  interest  in  all  things  pertaining  to  its  welfare,  though  he 

I.      1,1  .,  .  .,,„t  ition  for  public  otiice  or  political  activity.    He  gives 

le  cause  of  the  Republican  party,  and  he  and  his 

terian  church  of  Philadelphia. 

^1  Seth^'ivv-,  'vli')  likewise  wa.s 

-cr  of  George 

i  ue  i\v'  1 1;  '  ,  '  ' ...  Jr.,  an'i 


Mil 
at  r 


i>  reprf- 

.    ;  feed  busn.     . 

.'air  and  honorable 

1   factor  of  -n- 

■ns  and  ojicra- 

ade,  though  the  nonored  founders  of  the 

d  from  the  stage  of  life's  mortal  endeavors, 

-  this  paragraph  being  a  son  of  the  senior 

irm  of  Kemper  Brothers  and  in  hi.<  character 

.   added  to  the  prestige  of  the  f:iiiiily  name. 

orn  in  Chicago  on  the  8th  of  ikiuber.  1876, 

■■■'\  Anna  (Stilling)  K '      He  gained 

ipline    in    the    p,i  -chool    of    St. 

'ary's  C"  ' 
d  as  a 


*l   •  J 


178  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

ber  of  the  class  of  1894.  In  the  same  year  he  became  associated  with 
the  well  established  hay,  grain  and  feed  business  conducted  by 
William  and  Henry  J.  Kemper,  under  the  firm  name  of  Kemper 
Brothers,  and  his  entire  business  career  has  been  one  of  close  and 
effective  alliance  with  the  enterprise  that  thus  gained  his  youthful 
attention  more  than  a  score  of  years  ago.  His  honored  father,  Henry 
J.  Kemper,  retired  from  active  business  in  January,  1899,  and  the 
substantial  business  which  he  had  long  aided  in  maintaining  at  a 
high  standard  was  then  incorporated  under  the  present  title  of  the 
Kemper  Brothers  Company.  Albert  J.  Kemper  at  this  time  became 
secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  new  corporation,  and  of  this  dual 
ofifice  he  has  since  continued  the  vigorous  and  efficient  incumbent. 
The  Kemper  Brothers  Company  controls  an  extensive  and  im- 
portant wholesale  and  retail  business  in  the  handling  of  grain,  hay 
and  feed,  and  its  well  equipped  headquarters  are  at  1563-1565  North 
Halsted  street.  William  Kemper  became  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  on  the  4th  of  March,  1884,  and  that  he  continued  to  main- 
tain deep  interest  in  the  organization  is  shown  by  his  having  re- 
tained membership  until  the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred 
March  18,  1914.  His  brother  Henry  J.,  who  was  associated  with 
him  in  the  founding  and  conducting  of  the  business  now  carried  for- 
ward by  the  Kemper  Brothers  Company,  was  summoned  to  eternal 
rest  on  the  10th  of  April,  1908.  Albert  J.  Kemper,  the  immediate 
subject  of  this  review,  has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
since  May  7,  1914,  and  his  field  of  incidental  activities  has  been  ex- 
clusively in  the  cash  buying  of  grain.  Mr.  Kemper  naturally  takes 
abiding  interest  in  all  things  pertaining  to  the  civic  and  material 
welfare  and  progress  of  his  native  city  and  takes  pride  in  his  active 
connection  with  its  commercial  and  social  affairs.  He  is  affiliated 
with  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  both  he  and  his  wife  are  com- 
municants of  the  Catholic  church,  in  the  faith  of  which  they  were 
reared.  On  the  15th  of  June,  1904,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of 
Mr.  Kemper  to  Miss  Rosalie  C.  Blumenthal,  of  Chicago,  and  they 
have  a  winsome  little  daughter,  Rosemarie. 

Adolph  Kempner. — The  vigorous  and  progressive  president  of 
the  Adolph  Kempner  Company,  grain  dealers  and  commission 
merchants,  has  to  his  credit  and  distinction  an  admirable  record 
in  his  chosen  sphere  of  business  activity  and  also  as  a  loyal  and 
representative  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  with  which  he  has 
been  thus  identified  since  1890  and  in  which  the  year  1915  placed 
him  in  effective  service  as  a  member  of  its  directorate  for  three  years. 

In  1915  he  became  also  a  member  of  each  of  the  following 
named  standing  committees  of  the  Board  of  Trade :  Rules,  Mem- 
bership, Warehouse,  Violation  of  Rules,  Weighing  and  Custodian, 
Flaxseed  Inspection,  and  other  inspections.  In  1916  he  was  as- 
signed to  membership  on  the  following  committees :  Finance,  Rules, 
Membership,  Violation  of  Rules,  Arbitration,  Committee  on  Grass 


/, 


'/  ^-/.y^ 


y 


//^^Ji^^^^M/^ 


/> 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  179 

and  Field  Seeds,  Flaxseed  Inspection,  and  Insolvencies.  Mr.  Kemp- 
ner  was  born  in  the  town  of  Schrimm,  about  twenty  miles  distant 
from  the  city  of  Posen,  Prussia,  and  the  date  of  his  nativity  was 
October  27,  1869.  He  is  a  son  of  Isaac  and  Bertha  (Dienstag) 
Kempner  and  was  about  thirteen  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the 
family  immigration  to  America,  the  home  being  established  in 
Indiana.  Mr.  Kempner  continued  his  studies  in  the  public  schools 
of  the  Hoosier  state  until  he  had  completed  the  curriculum  of  the 
high  school  in  the  city  of  Elkhart,  where  he  was  graduated  as  a 
member  of  the  class  of  1885.  In  the  same  year  he  came  to  Chicago 
and  entered  the  employ  of  W.  G.  Press  &  Company,  prominent 
brokers  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  He  became  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  in  1890,  as  previously  noted,  and  he  continued  his  associa- 
tion with  the  lirm  mentioned  until  1899.  In  the  spring  of  that  year 
he  organized  the  commission  firm  of  Adolph  Kempner  &  Company 
and  from  modest  inception  of  independent  activities  in  the  com- 
mission trade  he  has  advanced  to  the  control  of  a  large  and  substan- 
tial business  of  representative  order.  His  business  was  continued 
under  the  original  firm  title  until  1911,  when  it  was  incorporated 
under  the  present  name,  the  Adolph  Kempner  Company.  Mr. 
Kempner  is  thoroughly  loyal  to  the  great  city  in  which  he  has  found 
opportunity  for  the  achieving  of  large  and  worthy  success,  and  he  is 
essentially  progressive  and  liberal  as  a  citizen.  He  is  affiliated  with 
the  Order  of  B'Nai  B'Rith,  holds  membership  in  the  Indiana  So- 
ciety of  Chicago,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Standard  Club.  In  1916 
he  served  as  president  of  the  Grain  Dealers'  Association  and  as  a 
member  of  the  Executive  Committee  of  the  Board  of  Trade  Mutual 
Benefit  Association.  On  the  12th  of  June,  1899,  was  solemnized  the 
marriage  of  Mr.  Kempner  to  Miss  Bertha  Hasterlik,  of  Chicago, 
and  they  have  two  sons,  Jean  and  Ralph. 

Dennis  J.  Kennedy. — As  a  lad  of  fourteen  years  Mr.  Kennedy 
began  his  novitiate  in  connection  with  the  grain  commission  busi- 
ness represented  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  his  native  city,  and  of 
this  great  commercial  body  he  has  been  an  active  and  popular  mem- 
ber since  January,  1896.  His  ability  and  progressiveness  have  been 
demonstrated  by  his  advancement  to  secure  vantage-place  as  one 
of  the  active  and  resourceful  traders  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  as 
representative  of  various  important  grain  firms  he  has  been  specially 
active  in  the  oat  pit,  as  has  he  also  in  his  independent  activities 
as  a  skilled  trader.  Mr.  Kennedy  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the  10th 
of  October,  1871,  and  is  a  son  of  Dennis  and  Mary  Kennedy.  He 
received  his  early  education  in  public  schools,  and,  as  before  noted, 
initiated  his  association  with  practical  business  when  he  was  but 
fourteen  years  of  age.  At  that  juncture  in  his  career  he  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Board  of  Trade  firm  of  Wm.  P.  Harvey  &  Co. 
in  1885,  and  in  this  and  subsequent  connections  he  made  the  best 
possible  use  of  the  opportunities  afforded  him,  with  the  result  that 


180  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

he  has  gained  prestige  as  one  of  the  successful  and  discriminating 
traders  of  the  greatest  commercial  body  of  its  kind  in  the  world — 
the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago.  Mr.  Kennedy  was  iden- 
tified with  the  First  Infantry  Regiment  of  the  Illinois  National 
Guard  for  a  period  of  three  years.  In  the  time-honored  Masonic 
fraternity  he  is  serving,  in  1916-17,  as  treasurer  of  Morgan  Park 
Lodge,  No.  999,  Ancient  Free  &  Accepted  Masons.  Is  also  a 
Knight  Templar  and  Shriner.  He  is  a  member  of  a  number  of 
leading  social  and  civic  organizations,  including  the  Beverly  Coun- 
try Club,  the  South  Shore  Country  Club,  the  Chicago  Yacht  Club 
and  the  Chicago  Automobile  Club.  Loyal  and  progressive  as  a 
citizen,  he  has  given  specially  effective  service  as  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Commissions  of  Calumet  Park,  and  he  served  two  terms, 
or  ten  years,  as  President  of  the  Board.  He  and  his  wife  are  active 
communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church.  On  the  30th 
of  August,  1894,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Kennedy  to 
Miss  Minnie  E.  Hall,  who  likewise  was  born  and  reared  in  Chicago, 
and  they  have  three  children :  Irving  Hall,  George  Raymond  and 
WilHam  D. 

Robert  P.  Kettles. — In  preparing  a  review  of  the  lives  of  men 
whose  careers  have  been  of  signal  usefulness  and  honor  to  the 
country,  no  name  is  more  worthy  of  mention  in  the  history  of  the 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade  than  that  of  the  late  Robert  P.  Kettles, 
chief  grain  inspector  of  the  Board,  and  for  many  years  a  prominent 
business  man  of  this  city.  Although  many  months  have  passed 
since  he  was  called  to  his  final  rest,  he  lives  in  the  memory  of  his 
friends  as  the  highest  type  of  a  loyal  citizen  and  an  honorable,  con- 
scientious man.  His  rise  to  distinction  was  the  result  of  his  own 
efforts,  and  his  record  demonstrates  what  a  man  can  do  if  he  has 
pluck  and  perseverance.  He  not  only  achieved  notable  success  in 
business,  but  in  his  home,  in  social  and  in  public  life,  he  was  kind 
and  courteous,  and  no  citizen  of  Chicago  was  more  respected  or 
enjoyed  the  confidence  of  the  people  or  more  richly  deserved  the 
regard  in  which  he  was  held.  Mr.  Kettles  was  born  in  Scotland, 
February  22,  1859,  a  son  of  Francis  D.  and  Margaret  (Philip)  Ket- 
tles. He  came  of  a  family  conspicuous  for  strong  intellect,  indom- 
itable courage  and  energy,  and  he  fully  exemplified  the  magnani- 
mous character  for  which  the  Scotch  race  have  always  been  noted. 
His  scholastic  attainments  were  those  afforded  by  the  public  schools 
of  his  native  country,  in  which  he  acquired  a  substantial  education 
and  won  advancement  on  his  own  merits.  Early  developing  an 
aptitude  for  business,  he  learned  the  milling  trade,  and  followed 
that  vocation  there  until  coming  to  the  United  States  in  1887.  It 
was  in  March  of  that  year  that  he  started  to  carve  out  a  career  for 
and  by  himself  in  Chicago,  and  thenceforward  his  life  and  enter- 
prises were  blended  with  the  growth  of  this  city.  Upon  his  arrival 
here   Mr.    Kettles    immediately   became    identified   with   the    city's 


C>pu^^-<^ 


^^^C^dt^i^.^ 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  181 

business  interests,  and  for  many  years  was  one  of  its  active  and 
most  prominent  men.  Obtaining  employment  as  a  sampler  for  the 
Board  of  Trade,  he  worked  in  that  capacity  for  two  years  and  then 
returned  to  the  milling  business,  operating  at  Piano,  Illinois.  After 
two  years  as  a  miller  he  returned  to  sample  grain  in  Chicago,  and 
the  firm  of  Kettles  &  Ware,  organized  at  that  time,  was  recog- 
nized throughout  the  country  for  its  reliable  grading  and  depend- 
able service.  In  1904  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  organized  its 
own  Department  of  Grain  Sampling  and  Seed  Inspection,  with  a 
view  to  securing  greater  uniformity  in  the  inspection  of  grain. 
The  excellent  record  of  Mr.  Kettles,  and  his  long  experience  in 
grain  sampling,  obtained  for  him  the  position  of  chief  of  that 
department,  to  which  he  was  appointed  in  that  year,  and  in  which 
capacity  he  served  until  the  time  of  his  demise.  During  the  many 
years  of  service  on  the  Board  his  knowledge  of  grain  and  inspec- 
tions commanded  the  respect  and  support  of  every  cash  grain  firm 
in  the  trade.  He  was  a  strict  disciplinarian,  believing  that  the 
grain  trade  required  the  closest  possible  attention  in  its  minutest 
detail,  and  as  a  judge  of  grain  he  was  a  recognized  authority  both 
in  this  country  and  abroad.  A  certificate  issued  by  him  was  con- 
strued as  the  best  evidence  of  the  quality  of  the  grain  described 
by  him,  and  was  taken  by  bankers  and  money  advancers  without 
the  slightest  hesitancy.  On  the  Board,  as  in  other  walks  of  life,  he 
reached  a  broad  field  of  activity  and  usefulness.  His  labors  were 
not  only  an  element  in  promoting  his  own  success,  but  consti- 
tuted a  potent  factor  in  the  development  of  business.  His  influence 
was  all  the  more  efficacious  from  the  fact  that  it  was  moral  rather 
than  political,  and  was  exercised  for  the  public  good  as  well  as  for 
personal  ends.  Mr.  Kettles  was  married  March  11,  1896,  to  Miss 
Rachel  Spence,  a  daughter  of  Andrew  and  Jane  Milne  (Philip) 
Spence,  of  Dundee,  Scotland,  and  a  woman  of  much  beauty  of 
character.  The  family  home  for  many  years,  has  been  at  7108 
Normal  Boulevard.  It  has  always  been  a  hospitable  one,  where 
good  cheer  abounded,  and  where  the  family's  numerous  friends 
are  ever  welcome.  Although  he  had  many  warm  friends  and  was 
prominent  in  social  circles,  Mr.  Kettles  was  devoted  to  the  pleas- 
ures of  home  life,  and  his  happiest  moments  were  always  spent  at 
his  own  fireside.  He  found  pleasure  in  promoting  the  welfare  of 
his  wife  and  friends,  and  his  humane  sympathy  and  charities 
brought  men  to  him  in  the  ties  of  strong  friendship.  He  was  a 
Mason  of  high  standing  and  a  member  of  the  St.  Andrew  Society 
and  the  Englewood  Scottish  Club.  In  his  political  affiliations  he 
was  a  Republican,  but  took  no  part  in  politics  aside  from  casting 
the  weight  of  his  influence  in  support  of  men  and  measures  work- 
ing for  the  public  good.  His  religious  faith  was  that  of  a  Presby- 
terian, and  he  was  active  in  all  good  work  of  that  organization. 
Although  unostentatious  in  manner,   Mr.   Kettles  was  recognized 


182  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

as  a  man  of  earnest  purpose  and  progressive  principles.  He  always 
stood  for  the  things  that  were  right,  and  for  the  advancement  of 
citizenship,  and  was  unfaltering  in  his  opposition  to  a  course  which 
he  deemed  inimical  to  the  best  interests  of  the  country  and  people. 
In  business  life  he  was  alert,  sagacious  and  reliable;  as  a  citizen 
he  was  honorable,  prompt  and  true  to  every  engagement,  and  his 
death,  which  occurred  June  28,  1916,  removed  from  Chicago  one 
of  its  most  valued  citizens.  In  the  light  of  later  years  the  record 
of  his  early  ability  is  most  interesting  and  significant,  for  never 
was  a  man's  success  due  more  to  his  own  native  ability  and  less 
to  outward  circumstances.  Nothing  came  to  him  by  chance.  He 
reaped  only  where  he  sowed,  and  the  harvest  with  its  valued  after- 
math came  to  him  alone  through  energy,  industry  and  persever- 
ance. He  reached  his  high  position  through  no  favors  of  influen- 
tial friends,  but  worked  his  way  up  from  the  bottom  rung  of  the 
business  ladder  by  sheer  pluck  and  marked  ability,  and  his  achieve- 
ments were  the  merited  reward  of  earnest,  honest  efforts.  The 
originality  and  profound  grasp  of  his  intellect  command  respect, 
and  yet  these  were  not  all  of  the  man.  In  every  relation  of  life 
were  shown  the  light  that  comes  from  justness,  generosity,  truth, 
high  sense  of  honor,  proper  respect  for  self  and  a  sensitive  thought- 
fulness  for  others.  What  a  magnificent  legacy  such  a  man  leaves 
to  the  generations  who  shall  come  after  him. 

James  KidstorL — The  late  James  Kidston  was  one  of  those 
strong  and  loyal  men  whose  identification  with  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  his  native  city  lent  its  quota  of  distinction  and  honor  to  that 
important  commercial  body,  and  his  character  and  services  were 
such  as  to  give  him  commanding  place  in  the  confidence  and  good 
will  of  all  who  knew  him,  so  that  there  is  special  consistency  in 
paying  to  his  memory  a  definite  tribute  in  this  publication.  He 
was  the  e.xecutive  head  and  founder  of  the  representative  commis- 
sion firm  of  James  Kidston  &  Co.,  and  his  two  sons,  who  were  his 
able  coadjutors  after  their  admission  to  partnership,  still  continue 
the  business  under  the  original  firm  name,  which  perpetuates  the 
memory  of  their  honored  father,  who  passed  from  the  stage  of  life's 
mortal  endeavors  on  the  30th  of  January,  1916.  Mr.  Kidston  main- 
tained his  home  in  the  beautiful  suburban  town  of  LaGrange,  and 
was  one  of  its  best  known  and  distinctively  influential  citizens. 
James  Kidston  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the  28th  of  February,  1853, 
and  was  a  son  of  Alexander  and  Ann  (Stewart)  Kidston,  in  con- 
nection with  whose  names  can  not  be  denied  pioneer  honors  as 
touching  the  great  metropolis,  which  was  but  a  small  city  when 
they  here  established  their  home.  He  to  whom  this  memoir  is 
dedicated  gained  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Chi- 
cago and  from  his  youth  until  the  close  of  his  long  and  useful  life 
he  was  closely  associated  with  the  commission  grain  trade,  of  which 
he  became  a  prominent  and  influential  exponent  in  his  native  city. 


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»  .-I    •! 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  183 

He  initiated  his  business  career  by  assuming  a  position  in  the 
employ  of  the  old-time  commission  firm  of  J.  H.  Hurlbut  &  Co., 
with  which  he  continued  his  association  from  1875  to  1883.  In  the 
latter  year  he  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Kidston  &  Cayzer, 
and  this  alliance  continued  three  years,  after  which  he  conducted 
an  individual  commission  business  during  a  period  of  eight  years. 
In  the  meanwhile  his  elder  son  had  been  given  excellent  training 
in  connection  with  the  business  and  was  admitted  to  partnership, 
the  younger  son  being  likewise  given  an  active  interest  in  the 
enterprise  somewhat  later.  The  two  sons,  William  H.  and  Ross  H., 
assumed  full  control  of  the  business  upon  the  death  of  their  father 
and  are  effectively  upholding  the  honors  and  prestige  of  the  name 
which  they  bear,  both  being  active  and  popular  members  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  of  which  their  father  became  a  member  nearly 
two  score  of  years  ago.  Mr.  Kidston  never  manifested  any  ambi- 
tion to  enter  the  arena  of  practical  politics,  but  was  loyal  to  all 
civic  duties  and  responsibilities  and  gave  his  allegiance  to  the 
Republican  party.  In  his  home  town  of  LaGrange  he  held  mem- 
bership in  the  Suburban  Club  and  the  LaGrance  Country  Club. 
The  centennial  year,  1876,  recorded  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Kidston  to 
Miss  Frances  J.  Henry,  who,  with  the  two  sons,  survive  him. 

Frank  I.  King. — One  of  the  oldest,  largest  and  most  important 
concerns  in  the  grain  and  clover-seed  trade  in  the  state  of  Ohio  is 
that  of  C.  A.  King  &  Company  of  Toledo.  Its  head  is  Frank  I.  King, 
a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  city  of  Chicago.  The  firm 
of  C.  A.  King  &  Company  dates  its  inception  from  the  year  1846 
and  the  history  of  which  has  been  one  of  consecutive  advancement 
and  amplification,  a  record  of  fair  and  honorable  dealings  and  pro- 
gressive policies.  Frank  I.  King  was  born  in  Paterson,  New  Jersey, 
on  the  25th  of  May,  1860,  and  is  one  of  the  seven  children  born  to 
Frederic  H.  and  Katherine  (Pierce)  King.  He  was  six  months  of 
age  at  the  time  of  the  family  removal  to  Toledo,  Ohio.  In  1866  his 
father  died.  Frank  I.  King  continued  his  educational  application 
until  he  had  attained  to  the  age  of  seventeen  years,  when,  in  1877, 
he  became  associated  with  the  successful  grain  business  conducted 
by  his  uncle  in  Toledo.  He  has  never  faltered  in  his  allegiance  to 
this  fundamental  industrial  and  commercial  line  of  enterprise  and 
through  his  vigorous  and  aggressive  association  with  the  same  has 
advanced  to  secure  status  as  one  of  its  most  prominent  and  influen- 
tial representatives  in  the  state  of  Ohio.  Mr.  King  has  retained 
active  membership  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  since  1900,  has 
been  most  appreciative  of  the  functions  and  commercial  advantages 
of  the  same  and  is  well  and  favorably  known  to  its  leading  resident 
members.  He  is  also  one  of  the  active  and  influential  members  of 
the  Toledo  Produce  Exchange.  The  fine  initiative  and  executive 
ability  of  Mr.  King  has  been  shown  not  only  in  connection  with  his 
extensive  business  activities  but  also  in  his  attitude  as  a  liberal  and 


184  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

loyal  citizen  who  takes  lively  interest  in  all  things  pertaining  to  the 
well  being  of  the  community,  with  the  result  that  he  is  consistently 
to  be  designated  as  one  of  the  representative  citizens  and  captains 
of  industry  in  the  city  that  has  been  his  home  since  his  childhood. 
In  1882  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  King  to  Miss  Jennie  E. 
Collins  of  Toledo,  and  she  passed  to  the  life  eternal  in  July,  1914, 
being  survived  by  four  children,  namely :  Mrs.  Thomas  P.  Day,  Mrs. 
Geo.  Wallace,  Frederic  C.  King  and  Mrs.  Walter  M.  Braun.  The 
son  Fred  C.  is  associated  actively  with  the  business  of  the  firm  of 
C.  A.  King  &  Company  and  is  one  of  the  able  and  popular  young 
business  men  of  his  native  city.  So  genial  and  diverting  is  the  text 
of  a  "scenario"  of  the  life  of  Mr.  King  as  prepared  by  himself  that  it 
is  a  privilege  to  perpetuate  the  same  in  this  connection :  "Once  a 
newsboy;  now  a  lobster.  That  tells  the  story  of  our  senior  editor. 
He  says  so.  He  is  always  candid.  Moving  pictures  generally  em- 
bellish, add  a  few  scenes  and  prolong  the  agony.  Shall  we?  Frank 
I.  King  is  city-broke  and  world-wise.  Like  an  Indian  he  trails  near 
home.  Mother  Queen  and  the  little  King  and  Queens  have  been 
globe  trotters.  They  have  been  from  Egypt  to  Hawaii  and  from 
Maine  to  Mexico.  All  work  and  no  play  makes  our  Senior  a  dull 
boy.  He  was  six  years  old  when  his  father  died.  After  that  it  was 
dress  like  Adam  and  Eve  or  hustle.  He  played  messenger  for  C.  A. 
King  &  Company  during  vacations.  When  nine  years  of  age  he 
carried  Petroleum  V.  Nasby's  evening  paper.  It  took  four  hours 
and  five  miles  to  make  the  trip.  When  twelve,  he  carried  the  Morn- 
ing Commercial  and  this  service  continued  nearly  three  years.  He 
attended  the  public  schools  and  afterward  worked  in  the  office  of 
C.  A.  King  &  Co.  He  was  graduated  in  1877  and  thereafter  worked 
all  day  for  C.  A.  King  &  Co.,  with  which  concern  he  has  been  ever 
since.  When  he  was  twenty-one  years  old  R.  Hallaran  oiTered 
him  a  third  interest  in  the  firm,  with  a  guaranty  of  five  thousand 
dollars  the  first  year.  Refused.  Uncle  Charles  gave  him  an 
eighth  interest,  and  his  share  of  the  losses  aggregated  six  thousand 
dollars  the  first  year.  Valuable  lesson.  Has  never  had  losing  year 
since,  but  we  have  had  several  narrow  escapes.  Been  liberally 
rewarded.  Have  oatmeal  daily  and  pie  on  Sunday.  Next  reel  will 
reveal  the  public  life  of  our  senior.  If  you  have  tears,  prepare  to 
shed  them  now.  Like  Teddy,  our  senior  had  the  Presidential  itch. 
Teddy  wanted  to  be  President  of  the  United  States.  Our  senior 
was  content  with  minor  honors.  He  started  as  President  of  his 
class  at  school,  was  re-elected,  but  the  teachers  vetoed  a  third  term, 
as  the  people  did  with  Teddy.  Broke  into  the  City  Council  when 
twenty-four.  Became  President;  was  re-elected  four  times  in  suc- 
cession. Then  deserted  politics  for  business.  Was  messenger  boy 
for  Teddy  when  he  was  elected  the  first  time.  They  call  them 
Presidential  Electors.  Been  twice  selected  trustee  of  the  city  sink- 
ing   fund.     Have    spurned    all    other   political    suggestions.     Since 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  185 

1888  have  bet  successfully  on  every  National  election  and  on  some 
State  elections.  Been  President  of  the  Toledo  Produce  Exchange 
three  times,  but  never  again.  Been  President  of  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce.  Helped  several  secure  a  business  start  and  saved  sev- 
eral from  going  on  the  rocks,  after  all  others  had  deserted  them. 
Started  and  collected  many  charitable  funds.  Somebody  secured 
one  hundred  and  twenty  thousand  dollars  for  the  Newsboys  Build- 
ing in  Toledo.  Somebody  started  and  secured  a  guaranty  for  five 
years  to  pay  part  of  the  going  expenses  of  the  institution.  Some- 
body invested  a  small  fortune  in  tickets  for  first-class  shows  to 
please  business  girls,  widows,  newsboys  and  others  and  to  popu- 
larize the  Newsboys'  Auditorium  Theater.  Theater  has  always 
been  his  chief  recreation.  Was  stage-struck  when  fourteen,  but 
that  would  make  another  reel.  Had  church  record  in  early  days. 
Some  call  us  generous,  but  a  fool  and  his  money  are  soon  parted. 
Will  never  be  a  millionaire,  imaginary,  real  or  prospective.  Believe 
in  enjoying  life  as  we  pass  along.  Expect  to  salute  his  Satanic 
Majesty  in  1933." 

Ralph  W.  King. — Through  initiative  and  executive  ability  and 
well  applied  energy  Ralph  Warren  King  has  achieved  distinctive 
success  in  the  grain  commission  trade  in  Chicago  and  is  at  the  head 
of  the  R.  W.  King  Company,  with  offices  at  the  corner  of  Root  and 
LaSalle  streets.  Mr.  King  had  been  a  successful  and  popular  sales- 
man in  the  wholesale  house  of  Marshall  Field  &  Co.  prior  to  enter- 
ing upon  his  activities  as  a  commission  merchant,  and  with  this 
great  Chicago  concern  he  gained  valuable  experience.  His  mem- 
bership on  the  Board  of  Trade  dates  from  the  year  1898  and  in  his 
private  business  and  active  association  with  the  Board  he  has  been 
appreciative  of  and  closely  observed  the  best  ideals  and  policies  of 
this  important  commercial  organization  of  the  western  metropolis. 
Mr.  King  was  born  in  the  attractive  little  city  of  Three  Rivers, 
St.  Joseph  County,  Michigan,  and  the  date  of  his  nativity  was  Octo- 
ber 6, 1871.  He  is  a  son  of  Jasper  and  Helen  Louise  (Greene)  King, 
and  he  was  a  child  at  the  time  of  the  family  removal  to  Berrien 
County,  Michigan,  where  he  continued  his  studies  in  the  public 
schools  until  he  had  completed  a  partial  course  in  the  high  school. 
After  coming  to  Chicago  he  entered  the  West  Division  High 
School,  and  in  the  same  he  finished  the  prescribed  curriculum 
prior  to  entering  the  service  of  the  great  wholesale  house  of  Mar- 
shall Field  &  Co.,  with  which  he  continued  his  association  until  he 
engaged  in  his  present  line  of  business,  in  1892.  His  success  in 
the  commission  trade  has  been  of  unequivocal  order  and  has 
been  worthily  won,  so  that  he  has  secured  place  in  the  confidence 
of  his  confreres  on  the  Board  of  Trade  as  well  as  in  the  general 
business  circles  of  the  city.  Mr.  King  is  found  aligned  as  a  loyal 
advocate  of  the  principles  of  the  Republican  party,  and  in  the 
Masonic   fraternity   he   has   received   the   chivalric   degrees   of   the 


186  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

York  Rite  as  well  as  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Ancient  and 
Accepted  Scottish  Rite  and  the  distinction  involved  in  crossing 
the  sands  of  the  desert  and  gaining  fellowship  with  the  Ancient 
Arabic  Order  of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  affiliated 
also  with  the  Benevolent  &  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  holds 
membership  in  the  Illinois  Athletic  Club  and  other  representative 
civic  organizations  of  Chicago,  both  he  and  his  wife  being  members 
of  the  Washington  Park  Congregational  Church,  and  their  home 
being  at  5113  Michigan  Avenue.  On  the  1st  of  June,  1897,  was 
solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  King  to  Miss  Nelora  Sarah  Borden, 
of  Chicago,  and  they  have  four  children — Jasper  Seymour,  Nelora 
Helen,  Ralph  Warren,  Jr.,  and  Winifred. 

James  M.  Kirby. — The  application  of  energy  and  ability  have 
brought  to  Mr.  Kirby  success  and  prominence  as  one  of  the  repre- 
sentative exponents  of  the  grain  commission  business  in  northern 
Illinois,  and  he  is  known  as  one  of  the  most  progressive  and  alert 
young  men  identified  with  the  important  line  of  enterprise  in 
DeKalb  County,  Illinois.  He  maintains  his  residence  in  the  village 
of  Shabbona,  where  he  has  an  office,  and  he  also  has  an  office  at 
Sycamore,  the  judicial  center  of  the  county.  He  makes  a  spe- 
cialty of  the  cash  grain  trade,  has  from  his  offices  a  direct  private 
wire  telegraphic  service  and  facilitates  his  operations  through  his 
status  as  a  correspondent  of  the  prominent  Chicago  Board  of  Trade 
firm  of  Harris,  Winthrop  &  Co.  Mr.  Kirby  was  born  on  the  home- 
stead farm  of  his  father,  near  Malta,  DeKalb  County,  Illinois,  May 
26,  1884,  and  is  a  son  of  Martin  J.  and  Helen  (Mitchell)  Kirby.  He 
early  began  to  assist  in  the  work  of  the  home  farm  and  in  the  mean- 
while he  made  good  use  of  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools, 
including  the  Malta  High  School.  As  a  youth  he  learned 
telegraphy,  and  he  was  thereafter  employed  as  a  telegraph  oper- 
ator until  1902,  when  he  became  associated  with  the  grain  com- 
mission business  of  W.  H.  Laidley.  He  severed  this  alliance  two 
years  later  and  became  manager  and  telegraph  operator  in  the  com- 
mission office  of  E.  L.  Harty.  Later  he  was  similarly  engaged  with 
the  firm  of  Hardy  &  Fitch,  and  after  engaging  independently  in  the 
grain  business  he  became,  in  1914,  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Day  & 
Kirby,  with  which  he  continued  his  association  until  he  established 
his  present  individual  brokerage  business,  in  April,  1915,  his  mem- 
bership in  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  having  been  recorded  in 
the  following  month.  The  privileges  of  the  great  commercial 
organization  have  been  of  great  value  to  him  in  developing  his 
substantial  commission  business.  Mr.  Kirby  gives  his  allegiance  to 
the  Republican  party,  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Shab- 
bona Congregational  church,  and  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Masonic 
fraternity,  his  ancient-craft  membership  being  in  Shabbona  Lodge, 
No.  374,  Ancient  Free  &  Accepted  Masons,  besides  which  he  be- 
longs to  DeKalb  Chapter,  No.  52,   Royal  Arch  Masons,  and  the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO 


187 


I 
I 


M  in  the  city  of  Rockford.     Mr.  Kirby  was  married  to 

M  !rowne,  a  daughter  of  E.  H.   Browne,   of   DeKalh 

e  one  child  of  this  union  is  a  daug^htcr — Marjorie  L. 

a. — Paul  Kuhn,  the  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  Paul 

>..  leading  grain  dealers  in  the  city  of  Terre  Haute;  In- 

if  the  prominent  and  valued  non-resident  members  of 

'  rade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  and  is  most  consistently 

.lie  recognition  in  this  publication.     Mr.  Kuhn  was  born 

.1  .o,  on  the  8th  of  June,  18(>4,  and  is  a  son  of  John  F.  and 

eth  (Davis)  Kuhn.  the  father,  whose  death  occurred  in  1907, 

T  been  for  tn^  •-   and  extensive  buyer 

nipper  of  vrv  \  a  high  reputation  for 

>s.     In   connection   with   this   same 
•  r--r 'v;--  the  subject  of  this  review 
e  of  the  family  name.     Paul 
V    schools  of  Illinois  for  his  early 
_  _      :  youth  be  became  closely  associated 
business  conducted  by  his  father  and  Samuel  C. 
jfri     %  uii.Hii  ii.  jj.'.rtlett,  so  that  it  was  possible  for  him  to  fortify 
himself  in  all  details  of  the  business  and  prepare  himself  for  inde- 
pendent and  far-reaching  operations.     He  is  today  known  as  one 
of  the  most  extensive  grain  dealers  that  can  be  claimed  by  either 
Indiana  or  Illinois,  and  in  connection  with  his  large  commission 

fes  a  chain  of   forty-five  well- 

.  ;  and  Illinois.     He  has  retained 

cago  Board  of  Trade  sjnce  November  16, 

<.-d  his  residence  and  business  headquarters 

I    since   1*^05      The  sc^pe  and  importance 

♦^hat  prac- 

ndred  per- 

iiance  with 

c-ii  one  of  the 

Kile  west,  with 


an 

Not    . 

memb< 

Merch 

Minncrtj 

product.  h;t 


e  asset.     As  a  liberal 
loyal  supporter  of  ihe 


.'It  in  itsctt  IS  a 
•■  citizen  he  is  aligiuu  ar 

■publican  party  and  he  and  his  family  are  comr.i ni- 

lotestant  P'piscopal  church.     In  the  year  189(i  was 

i;i:!rriage   of   Mr.   Kuhn   to   Miss   Emma   (laston, 

!<..  Gaston,  of  Terre  Haute,  Indiana. 

'■-■-. — Among  the  grain  dealers  of  the   United 

Ham  Henry  Lake  is  perhaps  one  o!  the  best 

Known  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago. 

i  member  of  the  Chicago  institution,  but  he  holds 

the  New  York  Produce  Exchange,  the  St.  Louis 

innipeg    Grain    Exchange    and    the 

nierce.     He    is    strictly    a    Chicago 

1  born  in  this  city,  SeptemlK;r  23,  1861,  the  .son 


.1  ''^» 


188  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

of  Marcus  and  Julia  Lake.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools, 
but  he  was  eager  for  active  employment,  and  when  a  lad  of  thirteen 
he  entered  the  employ  of  the  great  firm  of  Field  &  Leiter,  an  insti- 
tution which  gave  business  education  to  so  many  of  Chicago's 
successful  men.  His  first  connection  with  the  grain  business  was 
in  the  service  of  Dwight  &  Gillett,  in  1876,  with  whom  he  remained 
five  years  and  then  became  associated  with  Bartlett,  Frazier  &  Co., 
with  which  firm  he  was  connected  from  1S81  until  1889.  Becoming 
a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  October  29,  1886,  he  thus  ranks 
as  one  of  the  older  members.  The  year  1901  found  him  as  the 
senior  member  of  the  firm  of  Lake  &  Leask,  Arthur  Leask  being 
the  junior  member.  This  firm  successfully  conducted  business  in 
grain  and  stock  brokerage,  and  upon  the  retirement  of  Mr.  Leask 
Mr.  Lake  continued  the  business  as  W.  H.  Lake  &  Co.  On  July 
1,  1911,  Mr.  Lake  formed  a  connection  with  the  well-known  broker- 
age firm  of  A.  O.  Slaughter  &  Co.,  and  in  1916  he  became  a  partner 
in  this  concern,  which  easily  ranks  as  one  of  the  strongest  institu- 
tions operating  on  the  Board  of  Trade  and  the  New  York  Stock 
Exchange.  Mr.  Lake  has  never  sought  or  accepted  ofifice  in  the 
Board  of  Trade,  but  his  pleasing  personality,  his  liberal  and  pro- 
gressive views,  and  his  high  code  of  commercial  honor  have  made 
him  one  of  the  most  popular  members  of  the  organization.  In 
many  other  ways,  he  has  proven  himself  a  good  citizen.  He  served 
in  the  Sixth  Battalion  of  the  Illinois  National  Guard,  holds  mem- 
bership in  the  Fourth  Presbyterian  Church  of  this  city,  and  is  a  life 
member  of  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club.  September  8,  1885,  Mr. 
Lake  wedded  Miss  Ida  Church,  and  to  them  one  daughter,  Violet 
Church  Lake,  was  born.  His  second  marriage  occurred  August 
18,  1896,  when  Miss  Mary  Grace  Wirt  became  his  wife,  and  they 
have  two  children — William  Wirt  and  Mary  June.  Mr.  Lake  is 
one  of  those  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  who  add  strength  to 
the  institution  by  their  probity  and  ability,  and  who  have  helped 
to  make  it  the  foremost  institution  of  its  kind  in  the  world. 

Lorenzo  J.  Lamson. — Measured  by  its  beneficence,  its  rectitude, 
its  productiveness,  its  unconscious  altruism  and  its  material  suc- 
cess, the  life  of  the  late  Lorenzo  J.  Lamson  counted  for  much,  and 
in  this  history  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  an 
organization  that  was  dignified  and  honored  by  his  long  and  active 
membership  and  fortifying  influence,  it  is  most  consonant  that 
there  be  paid  a  tribute  to  his  memory.  To  be  regretted  is  it  that 
the  prescribed  limitations  of  the  publication  must  needs  curtail  the 
detailed  expansiveness  of  the  memoir.  There  is,  however,  a  pecu- 
liar consistency  in  giving  place  to  the  following  extracts  from  an 
article  that  appeared  in  the  Price  Current-Grain  Reporter  at  the 
time  of  the  death  of  Mr.  Lamson:  "The  philosophy  of  life  is  not 
a  finality,  but  one  of  the  most  beautiful  thoughts  is  in  knowing 
that  one's  influence  and  memory  never  die.     How  important,  then, 


0  <^ 


^l  .^» 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  189 

that  the  influence  should  be  for  the  better.  Such  was  the  life  of 
Lorenzo  J.  Lamson.  Many  men  will  come  and  go  in  the  greatest 
grain  exchange  in  the  world  before  another  like  him  becomes  a 
part  of  its  busy  life.  Across  the  evening  of  the  lives  of  many  men 
there  will  come  an  inspiration  and  a  hope  because  he  lived,  and  the 
silent  sadness  with  which  many  received  the  message  that  he  had 
passed  on  is  a  most  eloquent  tribute  to  the  respect  in  which  he  was 
held  by  his  associates.  *  *  *  He  was  continually  doing  good 
deeds,  but  he  was  quiet  about  it,  and  if  you  sought  to 
praise  him  he  listened  with  diffidence.  He  was  always  will- 
ing to  be  of  service  to  his  fellow  men,  but  he  never 
wanted  any  credit  for  his  charity.  *  *  *  L.  J.  Lamson 
was  never  in  the  limelight,  but  hundreds  have  been  cheered 
by  him  and  many  lives  have  been  bettered  because  he 
lived."  It  may  be  said  with  special  emphasis  that  the  character  of 
Mr.  Lamson  was  distinct  and  represented  the  positive  expression 
of  a  true,  loyal  and  noble  nature.  Even  as  he  played  a  quiet  but 
large  part  in  the  affairs  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  in  the  business 
world,  even  so  was  he  a  benignant  factor  in  the  community  life, 
and  that  in  an  equally  unassuming  way.  Few  men  of  such  marked 
business  resourcefulness  and  energy  have  trailed  in  their  train  so 
fully  the  true  beatitudes  of  life.  He  was  genuine  in  all  things  and 
was  of  that  metal  that  rings  clear  and  true  amid  all  the  changes 
and  chances  of  this  mortal  life.  May  not  this  specific  record  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  then  wisely  pause  to  do  honor  to  his  memory? 
Lorenzo  J.  Lamson  was  born  near  Big  Rock,  Kane  County,  Illinois, 
October  1,  1840,  and,  after  a  few  days  of  illness  from  pneumonia, 
he  died  at  his  home,  3720  Grand  Boulevard,  Chicago,  on  Friday 
morning,  February  5,  1915.  He  was  a  son  of  Samuel  W.  and  Sarah 
A.  (Voris)  Lamson,  who  came  from  the  State  of  New  York  to  Illi- 
nois in  the  late  '30s,  and  thus  his  childhood  and  youth  were  com- 
passed by  the  conditions  and  influences  marking  the  pioneer  era  in 
Illinois  history.  He  profited  characteristically  by  the  advantages 
afforded  in  the  common  schools  of  the  locality  and  period  and  his 
was  an  individuality  that  was  not  to  be  curbed  in  general  growth 
nor  in  a  positive  and  determined  stewardship.  Mr.  Lamson's 
earliest  experiences  were  in  connection  with  the  elemental  industry 
of  agriculture,  and  he  was  a  young  man  of  about  thirty  years  when 
he  came  to  Chicago,  in  1871,  and  found  it  soon  incumbent  upon  him 
to  aid  in  rebuilding  the  business  and  civic  structure  of  the  city 
after  the  historic  fire  that  swept  Chicago  in  that  year.  He  formed 
in  1874  the  grain  commission  firm  of  Lamson  Brothers  &  Co.  and 
together  with  his  elder  brother,  S.  Warren  Lamson,  of  whom 
individual  mention  is  made  on  other  pages  of  this  work,  built  up 
one  of  the  staunchest  and  most  successful  enterprises  in  this  line 
to  be  found  in  Chicago,  the  business  being  still  continued  under  the 
original  firm  name  which  they  adopted.     The  two  continued  to  be 


190  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

closely  allied  in  their  various  and  ever-expanding  business  enter- 
prises for  many  years.  Mr.  Lamson  became  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  in  1874  and  he  continued  his  active  connection  with  the 
body  until  his  death,  his  only  son,  Warren  A.  Lamson,  being  now 
the  executive  head  of  Lamson  Brothers  &  Co.,  one  of  the  most 
influential  concerns  represented  on  the  Board  of  Trade  at  the 
present  time,  as  in  the  past.  Mr.  Lamson  was  at  all  times  intensely 
interested  in  things  touching  the  social  and  material  welfare  of 
the  community,  and  this  interest  was  shown  in  liberality  and  good 
works,  though  his  characteristic  reserve  precluded  any  desire  for 
political  preferment  or  activity.  He  was  one  of  the  most  earnest 
and  valued  factors  in  the  work  of  Abraham  Lincoln  Center,  the 
social  settlement  of  All  Souls'  church,  and  there  can  be  no  measure 
of  inconsistency  in  here  entering  a  few  quotations  from  the  address 
delivered  at  his  funeral  by  Rev.  Jenkin  Lloyd  Jones,  the  revered 
head  of  the  institution  mentioned:  "I  dare  not  indulge  in  per- 
sonal reminiscences.  I  have  lost  not  a  parishioner  but  a  comrade, 
an  associate,  a  fellow  student.  *  *  *  Our  life  together  reaches 
back  through  nearly  three  decades  of  mortal  time,  three  decades 
in  Chicago,  with  all  its  haste  and  its  intensity.  The  graces  of  gen- 
tleness, open-minded  and  abiding  in  things  intellectual  and  spiritual, 
manifest  to  all  who  knew  him,  came  not  unsolicited.  They  were 
no  easy  gifts  of  Providence,  the  result  of  fine  combinations  of  tem- 
perament alone,  though  these  were  there.  I  know  the  road  over 
which  he  traveled.  *  *  *  This  man  for  years  habitually  left  a 
hurried  business  to  stop  on  the  way  home,  first  to  seek,  then  to 
enjoy,  the  communion  of  the  poets  and  philosophers  in  our  co- 
operative studies.  *  *  *  I  have  seen  this  man  who  under  ordi- 
nary circumstances  would  have  closed  the  avenues  of  intellectual 
growth  and  would  have  said,  'It  is  for  me  to  utilize  what  I  have,' 
break  through  the  bars  of  circumstances,  and  he  climbed  still 
higher,  cultivated  still  more  the  mind  and  the  eye  of  vision.  Other 
men  have  been  as  benevolent  with  the  things  of  life  as  L.  J.  Lam- 
son was ;  we  give  him  the  full  meed  of  praise  and  heartfelt  appre- 
ciation for  his  generosity  on  these  lines,  but,  added  to  and  above 
this,  here  is  a  man  who  knew  the  joys  of  poetry,  the  ennobling 
power  of  beauty,  the  high  places  where  souls  commune  with  the 
silent,  deathless  powers  of  thought  and  love  as  revealed  in  the 
words  of  poet  and  philosopher."  Mr.  Lamson  was  married  to  Miss 
Ida  C.  Fay,  who  survives  him,  as  do  also  their  two  children — Warren 
A.  and  Josephine,  the  latter  being  the  wife  of  Leslie  F.  Gates.  In 
conclusion  are  taken  the  opening  lines  from  a  beautiful  memorial 
tribute  paid  to  Mr.  Lamson  by  Althea  A.  Ogden  : 

"His  greatest  joy  in  life  was  doing  good — 
But  not  with  ostentation  or  with  loud  acclaim ; 
Kind  acts  known  only  to  the  grateful  helped. 
The  helper,  and  to  God." 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  191 

S.  Warren  Lamson. — For  the  long  period  of  thirty  years  Mr. 
Lamson  was  a  prominent  and  influential  figure  in  the  commission 
trade  in  grain  and  provisions,  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Lamson 
Brothers  &  Co.,  under  which  title  the  extensive  enterprise  is  still 
continued,  with  a  department  devoted  to  the  handling  of  stocks 
and  bonds.  With  the  business  of  this  old  and  influential  firm  Mr. 
Lamson  continued  his  active  identification  until  May  1,  1906,  since 
which  time  he  has  lived  virtually  retired.  He  is  now  venerable  in 
years  and  can  look  in  gracious  and  appreciative  retrospect  over  the 
salient  points  of  a  career  of  signal  honor  and  usefulness  and  one 
that  was  not  denied  its  generous  fruition  in  temporal  rewards.  Mr. 
Lamson  still  continues  to  take  a  lively  interest  in  the  business  and 
civic  affairs  of  the  city  that  has  long  represented  his  home  and  to 
which  he  pays  a  tribute  of  hearty  loyalty.  The  years  rest  lightly 
upon  him  and  he  is  by  no  means  inactive,  but  gives  his  close  super- 
vision to  his  various  capitalistic  interests.  In  addition  to  serving  as 
a  Director  of  the  Mercantile  Credit  Company  and  of  the  Illinois 
Brick  Company,  he  is  Vice-President  of  the  Mount  Hope  Ceme- 
tery Association,  and  this  corporation  receives  not  a  little  of  his 
fostering  attention.  He  is  one  of  the  honored  and  influential  citizens 
of  Chicago,  but  his  civic  pride  and  loyalty  have  never  been  of  demon- 
strative order  and  he  has  never  courted  the  glare  of  publicity  in 
the  course  of  a  signally  sane,  distinct  and  productive  career.  Mr. 
Lamson  was  born  in  the  picturesque  little  city  of  Nyack,  Rockland 
County,  New  York,  on  the  banks  of  the  Hudson  River,  and  the 
date  of  his  nativity  was  August  31,  1838.  He  was  an  infant  when 
his  parents,  Samuel  W.  and  Sarah  A.  (Voris)  Lamson  came  to  the 
West  and  numbered  themselves  among  the  early  settlers  of  DeKalb 
County,  Illinois,  where  he  was  reared  to  maturity  under  the  con- 
ditions and  influences  of  a  pioneer  farm  and  where  his  early  educa- 
tional advantages  were  those  afforded  in  the  common  schools  of 
the  period.  After  initiating  his  independent  career  he  continued  to 
be  actively  identified  with  agricultural  pursuits  in  this  State  until 
1868,  when,  shortly  after  his  marriage,  he  removed  to  Iowa  and 
established  his  residence  in  Marshall  County,  where  he  became 
prominently  concerned  with  the  development  and  upbuilding  of  a 
successful  nursery  farm  and  business.  In  1875  Mr.  Lamson  came 
to  Chicago  and  established  himself  in  the  commission  trade  in  grain 
and  provisions,  in  which  he  became  associated  with  his  brother, 
Lorenzo  J-,  under  the  firm  name  of  Lamson  Brothers  &  Co.,  and 
through  his  long  and  active  connection  with  which  he  laid  the 
foundation  for  his  stable  and  very  substantial  financial  prosperity. 
He  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  in  the  year  1875  and 
retained  his  membership  until  1909,  with  secure  status  as  one  of  the 
honored  and  influential  members  of  the  great  commercial  organ- 
ization in  the  upbuilding  of  which  he  aided  and  to  the  upholding 
of  whose  fine  code  of  commercial  ethics  he  contributed  to  the  full 


192  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

extent  of  his  influence.  Mr.  Lamson  has  never  had  aught  of  desire 
to  enter  the  turbulence  of  practical  politics,  but  has  given  his  well- 
defined  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party  and  has  taken  public- 
spirited  interest  in  all  things  pertaining  to  the  civic  and  material 
welfare  of  his  home  city.  Virtually  the  only  public  office  in  which 
he  has  consented  to  serve  was  that  of  member  of  the  Board  of 
Education  of  Oakland,  before  that  section  of  Chicago  had  become 
an  integral  part  of  the  city,  and  he  held  for  a  number  of  years  the 
office  of  President  of  this  Board.  He  and  his  wife  hold  membership 
in  All  Souls'  church,  over  which  the  distinguished  pastor.  Rev. 
Jenkin  Lloyd  Jones,  has  long  been  in  charge,  and  he  had  the  dis- 
tinction of  being  one  of  the  organizers  of  this  now  large  and  influen- 
tial church,  of  whose  Board  of  Directors  he  has  served  as  President. 
He  holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club,  the  City  Club 
and  the  South  Shore  Country  Club.  In  DeKalb  County,  Ilinois, 
the  year  1868  gave  record  of  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Lamson  to  Miss 
Martha  Huston.  They  had  three  daughters :  Nellie,  who  is  the 
wife  of  Harry  H.  Lobdell ;  Myrna,  deceased,  who  was  the  widow  of 
Pierre  K.  Tyng,  and  Ruth,  who  is  the  wife  of  Count  Giovanni  Car- 
delli. 

Joseph  F.  Lamy. — As  the  active  head  of  the  firm  of  J.  F.  Lamy 
&  Co.,  with  offices  at  208  South  LaSalle  Street,  Joseph  Francis 
Lamy  is  a  successful  representative  of  the  grain  commission  busi- 
ness in  Chicago  and  has  proved  effectively  his  versatility  and  re- 
sourcefulness in  connection  with  the  operations  of  the  Board  of 
Trade,  of  which  he  became  a  member  on  the  8th  of  May,  1907, 
and  of  the  historic  ideals  and  the  broad  functions  of  which  he  is 
loyally  appreciative.  Prior  to  coming  to  Chicago  he  had  gained 
effective  experience  in  the  commission  business,  through  his  mem- 
bership in  the  Merchants'  Exchange  in  his  native  city  of  St.  Louis, 
Missouri,  where  he  was  born  on  the  6th  of  October,  1875.  He  is  a 
young  man  of  distinctive  energy,  and  his  well-ordered  ambition  has 
led  him  into  a  line  of  business  enterprise  in  which  his  success  has 
proved  of  unequivocal  order.  He  is  popular  as  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  and  as  a  progressive  citizen,  and  in  his  adopted  city 
he  holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association,  one  of 
the  representative  civic  organizations  of  the  great  metropolis  of  the 
West. 

Langenberg  Brothers. — Among  the  specially  prominent  and 
influential  grain  commission  firms  represented  on  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  is  that  of  Langenberg  Brothers 
Grain  Company,  of  St.  Louis,  and  the  corporation  that  conducts 
business  under  this  title  is  known  as  one  of  the  important  receivers 
and  shippers  concerns  in  the  grain  receiving  and  shipping  trade 
of  the  West,  as  well  as  one  of  the  foremost  and  most  honored 
factors  in  the  operations  of  the  St.  Louis  Chamber  of  Commerce. 
It  is  pleasing  that  the  province  of  this  publication  is  such  as  to  make 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  193 

possible  and  consistent  the  according  of  specific  recogfnition  to  this 
representative  concern.  The  inception  of  the  business  now  con- 
trolled by  the  Langenberg  Brothers  Grain  Company  in  the  city  of 
St.  Louis  dates  back  to  the  year  1877,  and  its  virtual  founder  was 
the  late  Henry  F.  Langenberg,  the  honored  father  of  the  present 
President  of  the  corporation.  Henry  F.  Langenberg  was  born  in 
Hermann,  Gasconade  County,  Missouri,  on  the  18th  of  August,  1846, 
and  his  death  occurred  on  the  18th  of  December,  1915,  at  his  home 
in  St.  Louis.  During  the  long  period  of  his  residence  in  the  metrop- 
olis of  his  native  State  Mr.  Langenberg  was  one  of  the  most  hon- 
ored and  influential  members  of  the  St.  Louis  Merchants'  Exchange, 
and  he  gained  reputation  as  one  of  the  most  successful  exponents  of 
the  grain  trade  in  the  Middle  West.  As  a  young  man  he  served  his 
novitiate  in  the  grain  business  by  establishing  his  residence  at 
Springfield,  Missouri,  where  he  entered  into  a  partnership  with 
James  H.  Doling.  In  1877  he  moved  to  the  city  of  St.  Louis, 
where  he  engaged  actively  in  the  grain  and  hay  commission  busi- 
ness, as  the  manager  of  the  St.  Louis  office  of  the  firm  of  Doling  & 
Langenberg.  Mr.  Doling  retired  from  the  firm  in  1882,  but  prior 
to  this,  in  1879,  George  F.  Langenberg  and  William  J.  Haynes 
had  become  members  of  the  firm,  the  title  of  which  was  then 
changed  to  Langenberg  Brothers  &  Co.  In  1890  Mr.  Haynes  sev- 
ered his  connection  and  in  1907  the  same  action  was  taken  by 
George  L.  Langenberg,  the  two  being  now  associated  in  the  con- 
ducting of  a  prosperous  industrial  enterprise  in  St.  Louis — that  of 
manufacturing  steel  furnaces.  In  1900  Harry  H.  Langenberg,  son 
of  Henry  F.  Langenberg,  came  into  the  office  as  clerk,  and  since 
1905  the  old  established  business  has  been  successfully  carried 
forward  by  Harry  H.  and  Carl  H.  Langenberg,  sons  of  the  late 
Henry  F.  Langenberg,  the  founder  of  the  enterprise.  In  August, 
1915,  shortly  before  the  death  of  the  honored  father,  the  two  sons, 
in  consonance  with  his  advice,  effected  an  incorporation  of  the 
business,  under  the  title  of  Langenberg  Brothers  Grain  Co.  The 
father,  then  in  greatly  impaired  health,  was  made  President  of  the 
new  corporation,  the  two  sons  becoming  Vice-Presidents,  and  a 
nephew,  F.  W.  Langenberg,  assuming  the  office  of  Secretary  and 
Treasurer.  Through  the  active,  conscientious,  untiring  energy  of 
Mr.  Langenberg  the  business  of  Langenberg  Brothers  Grain  Co. 
had  developed  to  large  proportions.  They  were  doing  a  large 
European  and  Cuban  Export  business  in  wheat,  corn  and  oats,  and 
had  offices  in  New  Orleans  and  Oklahoma  City.  They  were  also 
actively  engaged  in  the  flour  mill  industry,  the  mill  being  located  on 
the  Frisco  Railroad  at  Republic,  Missouri,  and  having  a  capacity  of 
one  thousand  bushels.  After  the  death  of  the  father,  Harry  H. 
Langenberg  was  elected  President  of  the  Company,  Carl  H.  Lang- 
enberg and  D.  S.  Mullaly  were  made  Vice-Presidents,  and  F.  W. 
Langenberg  was  continued  in  the  dual  office  of  Secretary  and  Treas- 


194  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

urer,  this  being  the  personnel  of  the  executive  corps  of  the  company 
at  the  time  of  this  writing,  and  the  business  controlled  being  of 
broad  scope  and  importance  in  the  receiving  and  exporting  of  grain 
and  hay.  Henry  F.  Langenberg  achieved  success  and  prestige 
through  his  own  ability  and  efforts  and  guided  his  course  upon  the 
highest  plane  of  integrity  and  honor,  so  that  he  ever  commanded 
the  confidence  and  good  will  of  his  fellow  men.  His  broad  sympa- 
thies were  shown  in  manifold  but  unostentatious  acts  of  charity 
and  benevolence,  and  in  all  of  the  relations  of  life  he  manifested 
a  sublime  sense  of  personal  stewardship.  He  was  an  active  and 
liberal  member  of  the  Second  Presbyterian  church  of  St.  Louis  and 
was  essentially  a  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen.  He  was  for 
many  years  a  Director  of  the  Mechanics'  American  National  Bank 
of  St.  Louis.  No  member  of  the  St.  Louis  Merchants'  Exchange 
was  more  influential  or  more  popular.  He  served  as  a  member  of 
the  Directorate  of  this  commercial  organization  for  four  years  and 
was  its  President  in  1897  and  1898.  At  the  time  of  his  death  a 
resolution  of  regret  and  sorrow  was  passed  on  the  floor  of  the 
Merchants'  Exchange  and  St.  Louis  recognized  the  loss  of  a  most 
honored  and  valued  citizen  and  a  representative  business  man. 
Mr.  Henry  F.  Langenberg  was  married  to  Miss  Martha  Letitia 
Haynes,  at  Lee's  Summit,  Missouri,  in  1871.  Mrs.  Langenberg 
was  born  in  South  Carolina  and  is  a  sister  of  her  husband's  former 
business  associate,  William  J.  Haynes.  She  still  remains  at  the 
beautiful  home  that  is  endeared  to  her  by  the  gracious  memories 
and  associations  of  the  past.  Harry  H.  Langenberg,  President  of 
the  Langenberg  Brothers  Grain  Company,  was  born  in  St.  Louis,  on 
the  2d  of  October,  1879.  He  entered  Princeton  University,  in 
which  institution  he  was  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of 
1900  and  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  August  of  the 
same  year  he  entered  the  offices  of  his  father's  firm,  and  he  has 
applied  himself  assiduously  and  effectively,  has  gained  thorough 
experience  in  all  departments  of  the  business  and  has  proved  him- 
self well  fortified  for  the  discharge  of  his  executive  duties  in  the 
office  of  President  of  one  of  the  most  important  grain  concerns  of 
St.  Louis  and  the  Middle  West.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  since  1910,  and  is  a  worthy 
successor  of  his  father  as  a  member  of  the  St.  Louis  Merchants' 
Exchange.  He  is  a  Director  of  the  Mechanics'  American  National 
Bank  of  St.  Louis,  and  is  actively  identified  with  representative 
civic  and  social  organizations  in  his  native  city,  including  the 
Young  Men's  Christian  Association,  the  Provident  Association, 
the  Anti-Tuberculosis  Association,  the  St.  Louis  Country  Club, 
the  Noonday,  the  Racquet  and  the  Missouri  Athletic  Clubs.  On 
the  21st  of  April,  1908,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Harry  H. 
Langenberg  to  Miss  Alice  Morton,  daughter  of  I.  W.  Morton, 
one  of  the  prominent  and  influential  capitalists  and  bankers  of  St. 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  195 

Louis,  where  he  formerly  served  as  President  of  the  Union  Trust 
Company.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Langenberg  have  two  children — Henry  F., 
who  was  born  May  20,  1909,  and  Oliver  Morton,  who  was  born 
May  16,  1912. 

David  S.  Lasier. — The  representative  and  popular  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  whose  name  introduces  this  paragraph  has 
been  closely  and  effectively  identified  with  the  operations  and 
aiTairs  of  this  great  commercial  organization  for  more  than  thirty 
years  and  has  gained  secure  vantage  ground  as  one  of  the  suc- 
cessful and  influential  figures  in  the  grain  trade  that  is  centered  in 
the  metropolis  of  the  West  .  He  was  a  member  of  a  similar  organ- 
ization in  Detroit,  Michigan,  for  about  seven  years.  Mr.  Lasier 
was  born  and  reared  at  Freeport,  Illinois,  where  his  early  educa- 
tional advantages  were  those  offered  in  the  public  schools,  and  he 
has  maintained  his  residence  in  Chicago  since  1869.  Here  he  forth- 
with identified  himself  with  the  commission  grain  business,  and  by 
his  ability,  energy  and  good  judgment  he  has  achieved  distinctive 
success  as  a  representative  of  this  important  line  of  commercial 
enterprise.  Within  the  long  period  of  his  active  operations  as  a 
grain  trader  on  the  Board  of  Trade  Mr.  Lasier  has  been  associated 
with  various  firms,  and  in  1890  he  became  senior  member  of  the 
firm  of  Lasier  &  Hooper,  with  which  he  continued  his  connection 
until  1906,  when  he  sold  his  interest  and  retired  from  the  firm. 
Thereafter  he  continued  business  in  an  individual  and  independent 
way  until  1910,  when  he  formed  a  partnership  with  James  Crighton, 
under  the  firm  name  of  Crighton  &  Lasier.  This  alliance  continued 
until  1914,  since  which  time  he  has  again  conducted  independent 
operations.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since 
1885  and  at  all  times  has  shown  a  vital  and  loyal  interest  in  its 
affairs.  He  has  been  influential  in  the  direction  of  its  government 
and  functions  and  served  from  1911  to  1914  as  a  member  of  its 
Directorate.  He  has  long  been  affiliated  with  the  time-honored 
Masonic  fraternity,  and  he  holds  membership  in  the  Union  League 
Club  and  the  Illinois  Athletic  Club.  The  marriage  of  Mr.  Lasier 
was  solemnized  in  the  year  1894  and  his  four  children  are:  Ruth, 
Marion,  David  R.  and  John  W. 

Edward  F.  Leland. — The  junior  member  of  the  well-known 
grain  commission  firm  of  Ware  &  Leland  has  been  a  resident  of 
Chicago  since  his  early  childhood,  and  has  long  been  an  enterpris- 
ing and  influential  representative  of  the  commision  grain  trade, 
under  various  partnership  alliances.  His  membership  on  the  Chi- 
cago Board  of  Trade  dates  from  the  year  1884  and  he  has  lived  up 
to  the  full  tension  of  its  strenuous  activities,  has  won  high  reputa- 
tion as  a  trader  of  circumspection  and  judgment  and  has  command- 
ing place  in  the  confidence  and  good  will  of  his  fellow  members 
on  the  greatest  commercial  body  of  its  kind  in  the  world.  Mr. 
Leland  is  a  scion  of  staunch  New  England  stock  and  claims  the  city 


196  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  as  the  place  of  his  nativity,  his  birth 
having-  occurred  there  on  the  16th  of  May,  1862.  He  w^as  thus 
about  four  years  of  age  vi^hen,  in  1866,  his  parents,  G.  A.  and  Anne 
(Fairfield)  Leland,  established  the  family  home  in  Chicago.  Here  he 
was  reared  to  adult  age  and  here  he  duly  availed  himself  of  the 
advantages  of  the  public  schools.  His  initial  business  experience 
was  gained  when  he  entered  the  employ  of  A.  T.  Stewart  &  Co., 
a  leading  concern  in  the  dry  goods  trade  at  that  time.  Later  he 
was  employed  in  turn  with  Libby,  McNeill  &  Libby;  Parker,  Martin 
&  Co. :  W.  W.  Catlin  &  Co.,  and  finally  with  M.  C.  Lightner  &  Co., 
in  which  concern  he  retained  a  partnership  interest  until  1892, 
when  he  became  associated  with  J.  L.  Ward  in  the  formation  of 
the  commission  firm  of  Ward  &  Leland.  This  alliance  was  dis- 
solved in  1896,  and  thereafter  Mr.  Leland  conducted  an  individual 
commission  business  until  the  1st  of  January,  1898,  when  he  formed 
the  present  partnership  with  John  Herbert  Ware,  under  the  firm 
title  of  Ware  &  Leland,  individual  mention  of  the  senior  member  of 
the  firm  being  made  on  other  pages  of  this  work.  Mr.  Leland  has 
been  a  vigorous  and  popular  representative  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
and  takes  pride  in  his  membership  and  the  associations  which  it 
involves.  He  is  a  thorough  Chicagoan,  alert,  loyal  and  progressive 
as  a  citizen  as  well  as  a  business  man,  and  in  his  home  city  he  holds 
membership  in  the  Chicago  Club  and  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club. 
Charles  E.  Lewis. — He  whose  name  begins  this  paragraph  is 
consistently  to  be  designated  as  one  of  the  influential  figures  in  the 
grain  commission  and  stock  brokerage  business  in  the  West,  and  in 
his  extensive  operations  he  is  President  of  the  corporation  of 
Charles  E.  Lewis  &  Co.,  of  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  which  has  the 
distinction  of  being  the  only  company  northwest  of  Chicago  that 
is  listed  on  the  membership  rolls  of  all  the  New  York  stock  ex- 
changes and  all  of  the  grain  exchanges,  including  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago.  He  has  proved  himself  a  man  of 
splendid  initiative  and  executive  ability,  as  attested  in  his  building 
up  of  the  extensive  and  substantial  commission  and  brokerage  busi- 
ness of  Charles  E.  Lewis  &  Co.,  and  he  is  known  and  honored  as 
one  of  the  leading  men  of  afifairs  of  the  Minnesota  metropolis,  as 
well  as  a  liberal  and  public-spirited  citizen.  The  Minneapolis 
offices  of  his  company  are  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  building, 
with  an  uptown  office  in  the  Oneida  block,  Marquette  Avenue  and 
Fourth  Street.  In  addition  to  his  prominent  status  in  the  impor- 
tant line  of  enterprise  noted,  Mr.  Lewis  is  President  of  the  State 
Bank  of  Lewis,  Wisconsin,  a  town  that  was  named  in  his  honor 
and  to  the  civic  and  material  development  and  upbuilding  of  which 
he  has  contributed  in  most  generous  measure.  Of  his  liberality  in 
this  connection  evidence  is  given  in  the  following  quotation:  "In 
the  town  of  Lewis,  Wisconsin,  which  bears  his  name,  Mr.  Lewis 
has,  on  his  own  initiative,  built  a  church  which  for  architectural 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  197 

design  and  beauty  can  not  be  excelled  outside  of  the  larger  cities." 
Charles  E.  Lewis  was  born  at  Edgerton,  Williams  County,  Ohio, 
on  the  11th  of  November,  1858,  and  is  a  son  of  William  S.  and  Eliza 
(Wanamaker)  Lewis.  He  acquired  his  early  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  the  Buckeye  State,  and  in  his  youth  he  learned 
telegraphy  in  a  railroad  station  near  his  home.  To  achieve  this 
end  he  applied  himself  diligently  in  the  evenings  while  he  was  a 
mere  boy,  and  he  was  but  twelve  years  of  age  when  he  was  given  a 
place  as  a  telegraph  operator  on  the  line  of  the  Lake  Shore  & 
Michigan  Southern  Railroad.  Ability  and  ambition  brought  to  him 
consecutive  advancement,  and  eventually  he  was  given  a  position 
in  the  general  passenger  department  of  the  Minneapolis  &  St.  Louis 
Railroad,  with  headquarters  in  Minneapolis.  Later  he  operated  the 
private  wire  of  the  Minneapolis  Tribune,  and  from  1885  to  1888 
he  was  associated  with  the  grain  commission  and  general  brokerage 
business  of  Pressey  Wheeler,  of  Minneapolis.  In  the  latter  year  he 
engaged  in  the  same  line  of  business  in  an  independent  way,  and 
he  is  now  to  be  considered  one  of  the  veteran  representatives  of 
the  grain  commission  and  stock  brokerage  business  in  Minneapolis, 
the  original  firm  name  of  Charles  E.  Lewis  &  Co.  having  been 
retained  when  the  business  was  incorporated.  In  addition  to  being 
represented  on  all  of  the  leading  grain  exchanges  of  the  United 
States,  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange  and  the  New  York  Cotton 
Exchange,  Mr.  Lewis  is  an  influential  and  valued  member  of  the 
Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Minneapolis  Civic  and 
Commerce  Association.  In  his  home  city  he  holds  membership  in 
the  Minneapolis,  the  Minikahda,  the  Lafayette,  the  Athletic  and  the 
University  Clubs,  besides  which  he  is  similarly  identified  with  the 
Minnesota  Club  of  St.  Paul,  the  Kitchi  Gammi  Club  of  Duluth,  the 
Manitoba  Club  of  Winnipeg,  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association,  and 
the  Bankers'  Club  of  New  York  City.  He  is  appreciative  of  the 
experience  which  he  gained  in  the  initial  stages  of  his  practical 
service  as  one  of  the  world's  workers  and  signified  the  same  by  his 
membership  in  the  Old  Time  Telegraphers'  Association,  which 
claims  as  members  also  such  distinguished  men  as  Andrew  Carnegie 
and  others  of  great  prominence  in  the  affairs  of  the  Nation.  In 
politics  Mr.  Lewis  is  found  arrayed  as  an  advocate  of  the  principles 
of  the  Republican  party,  and  while  he  is  non-sectarian  in  his  reli- 
gious views  he  gives  appreciative  and  loyal  support  to  church  work 
in  general,  while  his  erection  of  the  beautiful  church  edifice  previ- 
ously mentioned  testifies  to  his  zeal  in  the  cause  of  Christianity. 
Of  the  normal  and  interesting  diversions  of  Mr.  Lewis  the  follow- 
ing statements  have  been  written  concerning  his  activities  as  an  en- 
thusiast in  trout  fishing  and  propagation  and  in  the  breeding  of 
fine  Holstein  cattle :  "He  has  a  trout  preserve  which  is  second 
to  none  in  this  country,  and  a  herd  of  Holstein  cattle  which,  while 
not  the  largest,  is  one  of  the  finest  in  the  United  States,  and  which 


198  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

includes  some  blue  ribbon  winners."  In  1884  Mr.  Lewis  wedded 
Miss  Mary  E.  Norris,  of  Hannibal,  Missour.i.  It  may  further  be 
stated  that  the  other  principals  of  the  corporation  of  Charles  E. 
Lewis  &  Co.  are  John  E.  Fritsche  and  T.  W.  Lewis.  Branch 
offices  are  maintained  in  the  cities  of  St.  Paul  and  Duluth,  and  the 
list  of  important  commercial  organizations  with  which  the  concern 
is  identified  is  here  designated :  New  York  Stock  Exchange,  New 
York  Cotton  Exchange,  New  York  Produce  Exchange,  Boston 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  Baltimore  Chamber  of  Commerce,  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade,  Chicago  Stock  Exchange,  Minneapolis  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  Minneapolis  Stock  Exchange,  St.  Louis  Merchants' 
Exchange,  Milwaukee  Chamber  of  Commerce,  Duluth  Board  of 
Trade,  Winnipeg  Grain  Exchange,  and  Winnipeg  Stock  Exchange. 
Charles,  Jr.,  and  Christian  Lichtenberger. — In  preparing  a  re- 
view of  the  lives  of  prominent  men  in  connection  with  the  history 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  none  are  more  worthy 
of  mention  than  those  of  Charles,  Jr.,  and  Christian  Lichtenberger, 
who  for  many  years  were  members  of  the  organization,  and  for  more 
than  half  a  century  were  prominently  identified  with  the  business 
and  social  life  of  the  city.  To  the  biographer  the  potency  of  a 
good  man's  life  is  very  real.  As  he  reviews  the  records  of  those 
who  once  played  their  part  in  the  history  of  their  time,  he  cannot 
help  being  impressed  by  the  influence  exerted  by  the  deeds  of  men 
who  never  sought  publicity,  but  were  ever  ready  to  do  their  part 
in  the  world's  work  for  civilization  and  progress.  Both  Charles,  Jr., 
and  Christian  Lichtenberger  were  active  in  the  affairs  of  Chicago, 
and  were  men  of  the  highest  type  of  character.  Charles  Lichten- 
berger, Jr.,  was  born  in  this  city,  April  8,  1853.  His  parents, 
Charles  and  Fannie  Lichtenberger,  were  pioneers  of  Chicago,  hav- 
ing come  here  from  Germany  when  young  and  afterward  made  this 
city  their  home  until  death,  the  father  being  a  cabinet-maker  by 
trade.  Mr.  Lichtenberger  obtained  a  substantial  education  in  the 
public  schools  here,  having  pursued  his  studies  in  both  day  and 
night  schools,  and  also  at  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association. 
He  was  self-educated  and  self-made,  and  his  career  was  one  of 
which  his  family  have  reason  to  be  proud,  for  never  was  a  man's 
success  due  more  to  his  own  native  ability  and  less  to  outward 
circumstances.  Early  developing  an  aptitude  for  business,  and 
like  many  ambitious  young  men  of  Chicago  in  those  days,  he  began 
to  carve  out  a  career  for  himself  at  the  early  age  of  sixteen.  His 
first  employment  was  that  of  messenger  boy  at  $3.00  per  week  for 
the  firm  of  Howard,  White  &  Crowell,  publishers  of  a  Board  of 
Trade  paper.  He  afterward  became  a  member  of  the  firm  and 
was  identified  with  the  business  until  the  time  of  his  demise,  the 
firm  later  becoming  Howard,  Bartels  &  Co.,  publishers  of  the  Daily 
Trade  Bulletin  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago. 
Although  members  of  the  organization  for  many  years,  neither  Mr. 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  199 

Lichtenberger  nor  his  firm  were  dealers  on  the  Board,  preferring 
to  confine  their  energies  to  the  interests  of  their  patrons  through 
the  medium  of  their  paper.  In  former  years,  however,  Mr.  Lichten- 
berger was  active  in  politics  on  the  West  Side,  and  was  President 
of  the  West  Park  Board  under  Governor  Richard  Yates.  He  was 
always  deeply  interested  in  Chicago's  welfare,  and  at  all  times  his 
sympathy  and  support  were  with  the  measures  that  in  any  way 
benefited  the  city.  No  man  of  his  day  was  more  deeply  interested 
in  its  material,  intellectual  and  moral  progress,  and  his  death,  which 
occurred  November  15,  1916,  removed  from  the  city  one  of  its  most 
valued  citizens.  During  his  administration  as  West  Park  Com- 
missioner he  designed,  and  was  instrumental  in  erecting,  the  beau- 
tiful Independence  Fountain  in  Independence  Square,  and  was 
always  alert  to  any  movement  that  would  benefit  the  general  public. 
Mr.  Lichtenberger  was  twice  married,  first  to  Annie  Hickie,  of 
Chicago,  who  bore  him  two  children,  Lottie  and  Edward,  the  former 
now  deceased  and  the  latter  a  resident  of  this  city.  This  wife  died 
in  1902,  and  in  1904  he  wedded  Mrs.  Anna  (Osner)  Lichtenberger, 
widow  of  his  uncle,  the  late  Christian  Lichtenberger,  of  the  firm  of 
Lichtenberger  &  Rang  (now  Henry  Rang  &  Co.),  grain  commis- 
sion merchants,  and  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago.  Charles  Lichtenberger,  Jr.,  was  a  member  of  the  old  Illi- 
nois Club  for  many  years,  and  was  prominent  both  in  social  and 
fraternal  circles.  He  was  a  Mason  of  high  standing,  and  was  the 
oldest  living  Past  Master  of  Hesperia  Lodge,  No.  411,  being 
twice  elected  Master  of  that  organization.  He  was  a  life  member 
of  Chicago  Commandery,  life  member  of  Oriental  Consistory,  life 
member  of  York  Chapter,  a  member  of  the  Shrine,  and  Past  Patron 
of  Golden  Rod  Chapter,  O.  E.  S.  He  was  a  man  of  great  mental 
capacity  and  much  beauty  of  character,  and  was  loved  by  all  who 
knew  him.  Although  he  had  many  warm  friends  and  was  promi- 
nent in  social  circles,  he  was  devoted  to  the  pleasures  of  home  life, 
and  his  happiest  moments  were  always  spent  at  his  own  fireside. 
He  found  pleasure  in  promoting  the  welfare  of  his  family,  and  was  a 
loving  husband  and  an  indulgent  father.  Mrs.  Lichtenberger  is 
also  prominent  in  Masonry,  having  been  a  member  of  the  Eastern 
Star  for  many  years,  and  like  her  husband,  is  active  in  all  good 
work  of  that  organization.  She  was  born  in  Philadelphia,  Pennsyl- 
vania, August  17,  1856,  a  daughter  of  Ferdinand  and  Sophia  (Blank) 
Osner,  and  has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago  since  1875,  the  year  of 
her  marriage  to  Christian  Lichtenberger.  Her  father  was  born  in 
Germany,  October  12,  1825,  and  removed  to  the  United  States  in 
1846.  He  settled  in  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  engaged 
in  the  leather  import  business  and  became  one  of  the  substantial  and 
valued  citizens  of  that  city.  In  1880,  however,  he  removed  to  Chi- 
cago, where  he  afterward  made  his  home  with  his  children  until 
death  claimed  him  in  1909,  his  remains  being  returned  to  Philadel- 


200  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

phia,  and  was  there  interred  with  high  Masonic  honors.  Mrs.  Lich- 
tenberger  still  maintains  the  old  family  homestead,  at  what  is  now 
1316  North  Dearborn  Street,  where  she  has  resided  for  thirty-eight 
years,  the  house  being  erected  by  her  first  husband  in  1879.  It 
has  always  been  a  hospitable  one,  where  good  cheer  abounded, 
and  where  the  family's  numerous  friends  are  ever  welcome.  Chris- 
tian Lichtenberger  was  born  in  Ottweiler,  Germany,  December  12, 
1836.  He  came  to  Chicago  with  his  parents,  George  and  Eleonore 
(Haas)  Lichtenberger,  when  thirteen  years  of  age,  and,  although 
only  a  boy,  he  showed  great  business  ability,  and  his  services  were 
sought  by  many  of  the  best  firms  of  the  city.  While  still  in  his 
minority  he  became  associated  with  Henry  Rang,  his  brother-in- 
law,  in  the  firm  of  Lichtenberger  &  Rang,  grain  commission  mer- 
chants, and  thenceforward  his  time  and  energies  were  devoted  to 
the  building  up  of  the  enterprise  with  which  he  was  so  prominently 
identified,  and  in  which  he  continued  until  the  time  of  his  death, 
August  24,  1888.  During  his  identification  with  the  business  in- 
terests of  Chicago,  he  reached  a  broad  field  of  activity  and  useful- 
ness, and  his  labors  were  not  only  an  element  in  promoting  his 
own  success,  but  constituted  a  potent  factor  in  the  development  of 
the  city.  Coming  to  Chicago  and  entering  business  life  when  a  boy, 
he  grew  up  in  this  city  during  the  period  of  its  most  marvelous 
development,  and  through  pluck,  perseverance  and  honorable  deal- 
ing, he  became  one  of  its  substantial  and  most  worthy  citizens.  By 
his  marriage  with  Miss  Anna  Osner  he  became  the  father  of  one 
son  and  three  daughters.  The  son,  whose  name  was  Henry,  died 
in  infancy.  The  daughters  are  Irma,  wife  of  Carl  G.  Boldenweck, 
of  Portland,  Oregon ;  Elsie,  wife  of  August  Mehlhorn,  of  Seattle, 
Washington,  and  Eleonore,  wife  of  Gustave  Pfisterer,  of  Lahr, 
Baden,  Germany. 

William  R.  Linn. — A  well  known  citizen  and  substantial  cap- 
italist who  has  been  significantly  alive  to  and  appreciative  of  the 
facilities  and  functions  of  the  Board  of  Trade  is  William  Robert 
Linn,  whose  entire  active  career  as  a  man  of  business  has  had  Chi- 
cago as  its  stage,  for  he  was  a  youth  of  about  seventeen  years  at 
the  time  when  the  family  home  was  established  in  this  city  in  1867, 
and  early  became  associated  with  the  firm  of  Linn  &  Reed,  which 
became  one  of  marked  prominence  and  influence  in  the  commission 
trade  in  grain  and  provisions  and  of  which  his  honored  father  was 
the  senior  member.  Mr.  Linn  has  long  been  one  of  the  best  known 
and  most  resourceful  operators  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he 
has  been  a  member  since  June,  1872,  and  he  has  given  judiciously 
and  liberally  of  his  financial  and  executive  co-operation  in  the 
furtherance  of  measures  and  enterprises  that  have  proved  potent  in 
advancing  the  civic  and  material  welfare  of  Chicago.  As  previously 
intimated,  it  was  in  the  year  1867  that  William  R.  Linn  entered  the 
employ  of  the  firm  of  Linn  &  Reed,  representative  commission  mer- 


p 


<^^.^P^n^ 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  201 

chants  of  that  period  in  the  history  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
city  of  Chicago,  and  this  association  was  continued  by  him  until 
1872.  Continuously  since  June,  1872,  has  he  conducted  an  independ- 
ent and  individual  commission  business  in  grain  and  provisions,  and 
his  operations  have  long  been  of  large  volume  and  marked  relative 
importance,  the  while  he  has  stood  forth  as  one  of  the  specially 
vigorous,  discriminating  and  influential  traders  of  the  Board  of 
Trade,  to  the  ethics  and  traditions  of  which  he  has  fully  lived  up 
and  to  the  upholding  of  whose  dignity  and  priority  he  has  con- 
tributed in  generous  measure.  In  addition  to  his  general  commis- 
sion business,  Mr.  Linn  was  engaged  also  in  the  operation  of  grain 
elevators  during  the  decade  between  1887  and  1897,  and  to  this  busi- 
ness likewise  he  gave  the  definite  impetus  of  his  vital  initiative  and 
executive  ability.  His  capitalistic  interests  in  Chicago  are  of  broad 
and  varied  order,  and  not  the  least  important  of  these  is  represented 
in  his  connection  with  the  South  Side  Rapid  Transit  Company, 
which  controls  and  operates  the  elevated  railway  system  of  the 
South  Side  section  of  the  city.  Of  this  important  and  influential 
corporation  he  is  not  only  a  director  but  he  is  also  giving  character- 
istically effective  service  as  a  member  of  its  executive  board.  He 
has  never  entered  the  arena  of  so-called  practical  politics,  but  is 
emphatically  loyal  and  public-spirited  in  his  civic  attitude  and  gives 
his  allegiance  in  a  generic  way  to  the  Republican  party.  He  holds 
membership  in  the  following  named  and  representative  Chicago 
social  organizations :  The  Chicago  Club,  the  Union  League  Club, 
the  South  Shore  Country  Club,  and  the  Chicago  Golf  Club.  He 
likewise  holds  membership  in  the  Lake  Geneva  Country  Club  at 
the  lake  of  that  name  in  Wisconsin.  Adverting  to  the  earlier  data 
concerning  the  career  of  William  Robert  Linn,  it  is  to  be  recorded 
that  he  was  born  in  Butler  county,  Ohio,  on  the  25th  of  March, 
1850,  and  that  he  is  a  son  of  Matthew  G.  and  Mary  E.  (Young)  Linn, 
who  removed  to  the  city  of  Terre  Haute,  Indiana,  when  he  was  a 
child  and  who  passed  the  closing  years  of  their  lives  in  Chicago, 
where  the  father  gained  and  long  retained  precedence  as  a  commis- 
sion merchant  and  as  a  valued  and  honored  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade.  William  R.  Linn  gained  his  early  education  principally 
in  the  public  schools  of  Terre  Haute,  Indiana,  and  was  about  seven- 
teen years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the  family  removal  to  Chicago,  as  has 
been  previously  noted  in  this  context.  On  the  14th  of  March,  1881, 
was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Linn  to  Miss  Nellie  B.  Butler,  of 
Chicago,  and  they  have  four  children — Mabel,  Howard,  Dwight 
and  Dorothy  C. 

John  H.  Lloyd. — In  June.  1915,  Mr.  Lloyd  became  a  member 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  city  of  Chicago,  and  in  the  develop- 
ment of  his  substantial  grain  business  in  the  city  of  Springfield, 
Illinois,  he  has  profited  greatly  through  his  recourse  to  the  facilities 
and  functions  of  the  splendid  commercial  body  with  which  he  has 


202  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

thus  identified  himself  in  the  metropohs  of  the  west.  He  is  the 
executive  head  of  the  firm  of  John  H.  Lloyd  &  Co.,  one  of  the  leaders 
in  the  grain  trade  in  the  capital  city,  where  he  has  been  actively  con- 
cerned with  this  important  line  of  industrial  and  commercial  enter- 
prise since  1885,  his  unassailable  reputation  as  a  man  of  business 
having  proved  one  of  his  most  valuable  commercial  assets.  Mr. 
Lloyd  was  born  on  a  farm  near  the  village  of  Virden,  Macoupin 
county,  Illinois,  December  16,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of  Thomas  and 
Arabella  (Ball)  Lloyd,  both  of  whom  were  born  and  reared  in 
Wales,  whence  they  came  to  America  in  the  year  1855.  They 
established  their  home  on  a  farm  near  Virden,  Illinois,  and  there 
the  father  continued  his  vigorous  activities  as  an  agriculturist  until 
his  tragic  death  in  1866,  he  having  been  killed  by  lightning.  The 
subject  of  this  review  was  about  three  years  old  at  the  time  of  his 
father's  untimely  death  and  was  reared  to  the  sturdy  discipline  of 
the  old  homestead  farm,  the  while  he  made  good  use  of  the  advan- 
tages afforded  in  the  public  schools.  After  his  graduation  in  the 
Virden  High  School  he  put  his  scholastic  attainments  to  practical 
test  by  entering  the  pedagogic  profession  as  a  teacher  in  the  schools 
of  his  native  county.  After  three  years  of  effective  service  as  a 
teacher  he  established  himself  in  the  grain  business  at  Springfield 
in  1885,  and  during  the  long  intervening  years  he  has  here  continued 
his  active  association  with  this  important  line  of  enterprise,  of  which 
he  has  become  one  of  the  most  successful  and  influential  exponents 
in  the  capital  city  of  his  native  state.  His  political  allegiance  is 
given  to  the  Republican  party  and  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of 
the  Presbyterian  church.  In  1889  Mr.  Lloyd  married  Miss  Mary  B. 
Loud,  a  daughter  of  Woodbury  Loud,  of  Virden,  Illinois,  and  of 
the  children  of  this  union  five  are  living,  namely  :  (Celia)  Mrs.  W.  R. 
Campbell,  of  Springfield ;  (Eugenie)  Mrs.  Kenneth  Landis,  of  Chi- 
cago ;  Agnes,  Eloise,  and  Margaret. 

Frank  G.  Logan. — Of  broad  intellectual  grasp  and  high  civic 
ideals,  Frank  Granger  Logan  has  long  held  a  place  of  prominence 
and  influence  in  connection  with  the  business  and  social  activities 
of  Chicago,  and  here  developed  an  extensive  and  far-reaching  busi- 
ness in  the  grain  commission  trade  of  which  he  continued  a  leading 
exponent  until  his  retirement  from  active  association  therewith.  Mr. 
Logan  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  city  of  Chi- 
cago in  the  year  1877  and  continued  to  hold  his  seat  thereon  until 
1901,  since  which  time  he  has  lived  virtually  retired  from  active 
business,  though  he  still  gives  close  supervision  to  his  large  and 
important  interests  while  also  contributing  liberally  of  both  time 
and  means  towards  the  promotion  of  the  problems  of  pubic  better- 
ment. Frank  G.  Logan  was  born  on  a  farm  in  Cayuga  county.  New 
York,  and  the  date  of  his  nativity  was  October  7,  1851.  He  is  a 
son  of  Simeon  Ford  Logan  and  Phebe  (Hazen)  Logan,  both  of 
whom  were  representative  descendants  of  sterling  old  families  that 


at 


IMjuA^ffy 


^^M/V-' 


4*   *\^  '^      '*A 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  203 

were  founded   in  America  in   the  colonial  period  of  our  national 
history.     Like  many  another  who  from  humble  surroundings  has 
attained  to  conspicuous  influence  and  priority  in  the  broad  domain 
of  commercial  activity,  Mr.  Logan  found  the  period  of  his  child- 
hood and  youth  compassed  by  the  benignant   influences  of  rural 
environments  and  his  success  in  later  years  as  an  exponent  of  the 
grain   trade  exemplified,   in   part   at   least,   the   knowledge   gained 
through  his  early  association  with  the  great  basic  industry  under 
the  discipline  of  which  he  was  reared.     In  the  old  Empire  state  he 
was  afforded  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools,  supplementing 
this  by  a  course  at  a  well  ordered  academy  in  the  city  of  Ithaca, 
the  seat  of  Cornell  University.  In  1870,  when  nineteen  years  of  age, 
and  prompted  by  ambition  to  seek  broader  fields  of  activity  than 
were  afforded  by  his  local  environments,  Mr.  Logan  cast  in  his  lot 
with  the  growing  west  by  establishing  himself  in  Chicago,  which 
city  he  saw  devastated  the  following  year  by  one  of  the  greatest 
urban  fires  in  the  history  of  the  world.     Here  he  assumed  a  clerk- 
ship in  the  dry  goods  establishment  of  Field,  Leiter  &  Co.,   the 
predecessors  of  the  present  great  commercial   house   of  Marshall 
Field  &  Co.     Later  he  gained  valuable  and  practical  experience  as 
an  employe  of  a  leading  commission  firm  represented  on  the  Board 
of  Trade  and  in  1877  he  engaged  in  the  grain  commission  business 
in  an  independent  way.     He  effected  the  organization  of  the  firm 
of  F.  G.  Logan  &  Co.,  the  business  of  which  was  rapidly  developed 
until,  largely  through  the  initiative  and  executive  policies  together 
with  the  honorable  and  steadfast  methods  of  its  founder,  it  became 
one  of  the  largest  and  most  successful  of  all  similar  enterprises  con- 
nected with  the  activities  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  in  which 
great  commercial  body  he  was  a  vigorous  and  influential  member 
during  the  period  of  its  recrudescence  after  the  memorable  fire  of 
1871   and   through   the   progressive   stages   of   development   to   its 
present  status  as  the  greatest  institution  of  its  kind  in  the  entire 
world.     It  is  interesting  to  record  in  this  connection  that  two  of 
Mr.  Logan's  sons,  Stuart  and  Howard  H.,  are  admirably  upholding 
in  the  grain  trade  and  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  the  high 
prestige  of  the  family  name.    As  constituent  members  of  the  firm  of 
Logan  &  Bryan  they  are  concerned  in  the  control  of  the  great  vol- 
ume of  business,  requiring  branch  offices  at  many  points  through- 
out both  the  east  and  the  west,  with  office  headquarters  in  New 
York  city  at  113  Broadway,  headed  by  Benjamin  B.  Bryan,  senior 
member  of  the  firm  and  Mr.  Logan's  early  partner  and  associate. 
Logan  &  Bryan  now  enjoy  priority  not  only  in  the  grain  commis- 
sion trade  but  also  in  the  handling  of  stocks  of  the  more  important 
order,  while  its  principals  hold  memberships  on  the  Chicago  and 
New  York  Stock  Exchanges  as  well  as  membership  on  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade.    Mr.  Logan  has  not  restricted  his  attention  to  busi- 
ness affairs  alone  but  has  been  a  close  student  and  discriminating 


204  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

collector  along  archaeological  and  historical  lines  and  has  been 
especially  liberal  in  his  support  of  those  agencies  which  represent 
the  higher  ideals  and  privileges  in  civic  life.  His  fine  and  compre- 
hensive collection  of  archaeological  specimens,  exhibited  in  the 
anthropological  department  of  the  World's  Columbian  Exposition, 
held  in  Chicago  in  1893,  was  later  presented  by  him  to  Beloit  Col- 
lege, of  which  institution,  for  twenty  years,  he  has  been  a  trustee 
and  the  museum  of  which  bears  his  name.  In  the  Illinois  Historical 
Society  is  displayed  his  especially  interesting  and  invaluable  col- 
lection of  relics  pertaining  to  the  lives  of  Abraham  Lincoln  and 
John  Brown.  He  is  an  active  and  valued  member  of  this  society 
and  has  been  one  of  those  primarily  active  in  the  upbuilding  and 
direction  of  one  of  Chicago's  greatest  and  noblest  institutions,  the 
Art  Institute,  which  he  has  served  as  vice-president  since  1906  and 
to  the  furtherance  of  whose  development,  in  all  departments,  he  has 
contributed  liberally  and  judiciously.  He  was  one  of  the  founders 
of  the  Friends  of  American  Art  and  served  the  organization  as  a 
vice-president ;  he  served  also  as  one  of  the  Commission  for  the 
Encouragement  of  Local  Art,  established  and  endowed  in  the  city 
of  Chicago.  In  his  private  gallery  are  to  be  found  many  valuable 
specimens  of  both  ancient  and  modern  art,  including  one  of  the 
really  great  collections  of  the  masterpieces  of  the  Barbazon  and 
Dutch  schools  in  this  country.  Mr.  Logan  has  also  taken  deep  and 
active  interest  in  political  and  legislative  affairs  and  among  the 
services  he  has  given  in  behalf  of  the  public  welfare  should  here  be 
mentioned  his  labor  contributed  as  director  and  chairman  of  the 
executive  committee  of  the  National  Soil  Conservation  League, 
which  was  largely  instrumental  in  placing  upon  the  statute  books 
of  the  nation  the  Smith-Lever  agricultural  act,  regarded  by  many 
as  the  greatest  constructive  act  of  legislation  passed  in  a  genera- 
tion. He  also  served  in  the  same  capacities  in  the  successful  work 
of  having  passed  by  congress  the  non-partisan  tarifif  commission  act, 
for  the  stabilizing  of  the  general  business  of  the  country.  He  is 
now  actively  enlisted  in  a  propaganda  for  the  enactment  by  con- 
gress of  an  act  providing  for  universal  military  training.  In  1882, 
he  married  Josephine  I.  Hancock,  daughter  of  the  late  Colonel  John 
L.  Hancock,  who  was  a  war-time  president  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
and  of  whom  extended  notice  is  given  elsewhere  in  this  work.  The 
five  children  born  to  this  union  are :  Rhea,  Stuart,  Howard  H., 
Spencer,  and  Waldo.  Mr.  Logan  maintains  membership  in  the 
Union  League,  City,  Onwentsia,  Old  Elm.  Clil?  Dwellers,  and  the 
South  Shore  Country  Clubs  and  the  family  home  is  at  1150  Lake 
Shore  Drive. 

Thomas  P.  Loney. — In  June,  1910,  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade 
gained  as  one  of  its  members  from  the  city  of  Baltimore,  Maryland, 
the  well-known  grain  broker,  whose  name  begins  this  paragraph 
and  who  conducts  an  independent  and  successful  commission  trade 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  205 

in  his  native  city,  with  offices  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  building. 
He  has  been  essentially  the  architect  of  his  own  fortunes  and  has 
made  for  himself  a  secure  and  most  reputable  place  as  one  of  the 
able  business  men  of  Baltimore,  where  he  is  an  active  and  influ- 
ential member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  Thomas  Poindexter 
Loney  was  born  in  Baltimore  on  the  24th  of  July,  1856,  and  is  a  son 
of  Thomas  D.  Loney,  who  was  long  numbered  among  the  promi- 
nent business  men  of  that  city,  where  he  became  a  successful  grain 
commission  merchant  and  where  he  was  a  charter  member  of  the 
Corn  and  Flour  Exchange,  his  death  having  occurred  August  15, 
1889.  Thomas  P.  Loney  attended  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
city  until  he  was  fourteen  years  of  age,  and  at  the  age  of  sixteen 
years  he  there  became  an  employe  in  a  drygoods  and  grocery  estab- 
lishment. With  this  business  he  continued  his  association  about  a 
decade  and  he  then,  in  1879,  turned  his  attention  to  the  grain  busi- 
ness, in  which  he  has  achieved  large  and  worthy  success,  with  inci- 
dental standing  as  one  of  the  influential  grain  brokers  in  his  native 
city.  Fair  and  honorable  methods  and  policies  have  characterized 
all  of  his  operations  and  have  gained  and  retained  to  him  a  strong 
clientele.  He  is  a  loyal  and  progressive  citizen,  is  a  Republican  in 
his  political  allegiance,  but  he  has  had  no  ambition  to  enter  the  arena 
of  practical  politics  or  to  become  an  aspirant  for  public  office  of 
any  kind.  Mr.  Loney  married  Miss  Grace  Richardson,  of  Baltimore, 
and  they  have  three  children. 

Walter  A.  Long. — The  Long  Commission  Company,  of  which 
Walter  A.  Long  is  president,  has  developed  a  large  and  important 
business  in  the  handling  of  grain,  provisions  and  cotton,  with  special 
attention  given  to  the  cash  buying  of  grain.  The  main  office  of 
the  company  is  maintained  in  the  city  of  Quincy,  Adams  county, 
Illinois,  and  branch  offices  are  established  at  Mount  Sterling,  Illi- 
nois, and  Keokuk,  Iowa.  In  connection  with  the  affairs  of  these 
three  important  offices  a  corps  of  efficient  assistants  is  retained, 
and  the  vigorous  and  progressive  president  of  the  company  guides 
its  general  policies  and  functions  with  circumspection  and  charac- 
teristic energy,  virtually  his  entire  commercial  experience  having 
been  in  connection  with  the  grain  and  milling  business,  of  which  he 
has  become  a  prominent  and  successful  representative.  He  is  a 
popular  and  appreciative  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  with  which  great  organization  he  has  been  thus 
identified  since  1910.  Though  he  has  made  a  record  of  admirable 
achievement  in  the  business  world  and  is  still  a  young  man,  Mr. 
Long  has  also  to  his  credit  and  distinction  nearly  ten  years  of  effi- 
cient military  service,  including  three  years  as  a  member  of  the 
regular  army  of  the  United  States ;  one  year  and  seven  months  in 
the  Philippine  service,  in  command  11th  Company,  Macabebe 
Scouts,,  and  the  remainder  of  the  time  as  a  member  of  the  Illinois 
National  Guard.     He  was  in  the  government  service  in  the  Philip- 


206  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

pine  Islands  for  a  period  of  five  years,  and  within  this  time  acquired 
excellent  command  of  the  Spanish  language.  As  a  member  of  the 
United  States  Army  Mr.  Long  won  by  efficient  service  successive 
promotions,  as  he  advanced  from  the  position  of  private  to  that  of 
corporal,  next  was  made  sergeant  and  finally  first  sergeant  of  Com- 
pany A,  Twenty-eighth  Regiment  of  Infantry.  While  serving  as 
corporal  in  the  Philippine  Islands  he  was  assigned  to  special  duty 
as  acting  post  commissary  sergeant,  and  of  this  position  he  con- 
tinued the  incumbent  thirteen  months.  As  sergeant  of  the  above 
mentioned  company  he  finally  received  his  honorable  discharge 
from  the  regular  army  of  the  United  States.  Patriotism  and  valor 
marked  his  course  during  his  active  military  career  and  it  may  well 
be  understood  that  he  is  the  staunch  advocate  of  national  military 
preparedness  in  his  native  land,  for  he  realized  the  necessity  of  such 
provision,  both  through  judgment  and  sentiment  as  well  as  personal 
experience  of  a  practical  order.  Of  Mr.  Long's  association  with  the 
Illinois  National  Guard  it  may  be  stated  that  in  1910  he  was  made 
second  lieutenant  of  the  Fifth  Infantry  Regiment,  and  was  assigned 
to  the  Second  Battalion  as  quartermaster  and  commissary.  In  1912 
he  was  elected  captain  of  Company  F  of  this  regiment,  and  he  re- 
tained this  office  until  1914,  when  the  exigencies  of  his  business 
affairs  compelled  him  to  resign  his  commission.  Captain  Long,  as  he 
is  familiarly  and  consistently  known,  was  born  at  Lineville,  Wayne 
county,  Iowa,  on  the  27th  of  March,  1880,  and  is  the  son  of  Richard 
and  Mary  (Power)  Long,  his  father,  who  was  born  in  the  state  of 
Kentucky,  having  become  one  of  the  substantial  farmers  and  hon- 
ored citizens  of  Wayne  county,  Iowa,  where  he  established  his  home 
in  the  pioneer  days.  Captain  Long  was  reared  under  the  invigorat- 
ing discipline  of  the  farm,  profited  fully  b}'  the  advantages  afforded 
in  the  public  schools  of  the  Hawkeye  state  and  finally  entered  the 
University  of  California,  in  which  institution  he  was  graduated  as 
a  member  of  the  class  of  1898.  As  a  youth  he  acquired  practical 
experience  in  connection  with  the  grain  and  milling  business,  even 
prior  to  his  military  career,  and  for  a  number  of  years  he  held  a 
responsible  executive  position  with  the  Berry  Milling  &  Grain  Com- 
pany, of  Barry,  111.  In  his  independent  activities  as  a  commission 
merchant  he  has  achieved  distinctive  and  worthy  success  and  prece- 
dence, as  indicated  by  his  status  as  president  of  the  Long  Commis- 
sion Company,  as  chief  executive  of  which  he  maintains  his  home 
at  Quincy,  Illinois.  He  has  made  a  careful  study  of  the  commission 
business  and  in  the  year  1917  is  engaged  in  the  compilation  of  a 
book  in  which  he  will  embody  the  results  of  his  investigation  and 
experience,  the  publication  to  be  given  the  title  of  "Speculation: 
Its  Use  and  Abuse."  The  Captain  is  a  staunch  Republican  in  his 
political  allegiance,  is  affiliated  with  the  Benevolent  &  Protective 
Order  of  Elks  and  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and  he 
and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church.     In  1911 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  207 

was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Captain  Long  to  Miss  Myrtle  Mas- 
ters, daughter  of  Charles  Masters,  of  Kinderhook,  Illinois,  and  the 
one  child  of  this  union  is  a  daughter,  Grace. 

Albert  C.  Loring. — It  is  specially  gratifying  to  note  that  by  rea- 
son of  his  holding  active  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago  the  president  of  the  great  Pillsl)ury  Flour  Mills 
Company,  of  Minneapolis,  becomes  eligible  for  specific  recognition 
in  this  publication.  As  head  of  one  of  the  most  extensive  flour- 
manufacturing  corporations  in  the  world  Mr.  Loring  is  naturally 
one  of  the  prominent  and  influential  citizens  of  the  Minnesota  me- 
tropolis, and  he  stands  as  a  fine  type  of  the  American  captain  of  in- 
dustry, with  a  splendid  record  of  achievement  and  with  a  reputa- 
tation  that  denotes  the  strength  and  sterling  character  of  the  man. 
He  has  contributed  much  to  the  civic,  industrial  and  commercial 
advancement  of  Minneapolis  and  the  great  northwest  and  has  been 
president  of  the  Pillsbury  Flour  Mills  Company  from  the  time  of 
its  incorporation  under  the  present  title,  the  great  scope  and  im- 
portance of  the  business  of  this  company  being  so  well  known  that 
any  description  of  the  enterprise  is  not  demanded  in  this  abridged 
review.  Albert  Carpenter  Loring  was  born  in  the  city  of  Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin,  August  31,  1858,  and  thus  has  naturally  become  a 
resourceful  exponent  of  the  progressive  spirit  of  the  west.  He  is  a 
son  of  Charles  M.  and  Emily  (Crossman)  Loring,  and  his  father 
was  one  of  the  honored  and  influential  pioneer  business  men  of  the 
Wisconsin  metropolis,  whence  he  later  removed  to  Minnesota, 
where  he  passed  the  closing  years  of  his  life.  He  whose  name 
introduces  this  article  profited  by  the  advantages  of  the  public 
schools  of  Milwaukee  and  Minneapolis,  besides  having  attended  the 
West  Newton  Preparatory  School,  at  West  Newton,  Massachu- 
setts. He  was  also  a  student  in  the  University  of  Minnesota.  Min- 
neapolis has  figured  as  the  central  stage  of  his  business  activities 
during  practically  the  entire  period  of  his  significantly  successful 
career.  As  a  youth  he  was  employed  by  the  firm  of  L.  Fletcher 
&  Company,  which  was  not  only  engaged  in  the  general  merchan- 
dise business  but  also  in  the  operation  of  flour  mills.  In  1877  Mr. 
Loring  became  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Minnetonka  Milling 
Company,  which  then  operated  one  of  the  largest  flour  mills  in 
Minneapolis.  Later  he  effected  the  organization  of  the  Galaxy 
Milling  Company,  of  which  he  was  the  original  secretary  and  treas- 
urer and  of  which  he  eventually  became  president.  He  was  the 
prime  factor  in  the  organization  of  the  Northwestern  Consolidated 
Milling  Company,  of  which  he  served  as  president  and  general  man- 
ager for  a  long  term  of  years.  Progress  has  marked  the  business 
life  of  Mr.  Loring  in  the  most  significant  sense,  and  his  energy,  cir- 
cumspection and  initiative  and  administrative  ability  have  given 
him  definite  leadership  in  the  industrial  and  commercial  affairs  of 
the  great  west,  where   his   influence   has   always   been   direct  and 


208  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

beneficent.  He  has  been  president  of  the  Pillsbury  Flour  Mills 
Company  from  the  time  of  its  organization,  and  has  directed 
the  policies  of  the  great  corporation  with  consummate  discrimina- 
tion and  efifectiveness.  He  is  president  also  of  the  North  Star  Malt- 
ing Company,  and  has  other  large  and  important  capitalistic  inter- 
ests, involving  executive  service  in  a  number  of  leading  financial  in- 
stitutions in  Minneapolis.  He  has  been  liberal  and  public-spirited  in 
a  marked  degree  and  has  done  much  to  further  the  civic  and  mate- 
rial advancement  and  prosperity  of  his  home  city  and  the  great 
state  of  which  it  is  the  metropolis.  Mr.  Loring  has  held  member- 
ship in  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  many  years,  and  has  shown  loyal 
appreciation  of  its  functions  as  bearing  upon  the  grain  commerce 
of  which  it  is  the  world's  most  important  center.  He  is  similarly 
identified  with  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  Duluth 
Board  of  Trade.  A  man  who  has  made  a  close  study  of  govern- 
mental and  economic  problems,  Mr.  Loring  has  the  mature  judg- 
ment that  makes  his  counsel  of  value  in  connection  with  affairs  of 
the  greatest  importance  to  the  people  in  general,  and  he  is  a  stalwart 
and  well  fortified  advocate  of  the  basic  principles  for  which  the 
Republican  party  has  ever  stood  sponsor.  He  is  identified  with 
representative  civic  and  social  organization  in  Minneapolis,  includ- 
ing the  Minikahda  and  the  Lafayette  Clubs. 

Robert  Thomas  Lunham. — In  preparing  a  review  of  the  lives  of 
men  whose  careers  have  been  of  signal  usefulness  and  honor  to  the 
country,  no  name  is  more  worthy  of  mention  in  the  history  of  the 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade  than  that  of  the  late  Robert  T.  Lunham, 
for  many  years  a  prominent  business  man  of  this  city.  Although 
more  than  four  years  have  passed  since  he  was  called  to  his  final 
rest,  he  lives  in  the  memory  of  his  friends  as  the  highest  type  of  a 
loval  citizen  and  an  honorable,  conscientious  man.  He  not  only 
achieved  notable  success  in  business,  but  his  life  was  actuated  by 
high  ideals  and  spent  in  close  conformity  therewith.  His  rise  to 
distinction  was  the  result  of  his  own  efforts,  and  his  record  dem- 
onstrates what  a  man  can  do  if  he  has  pluck  and  perseverance.  In 
his  home,  in  social  and  in  business  life,  he  was  ever  kind  and  cour- 
teous, and  no  citizen  of  Chicago  was  more  respected  or  enjoyed  the 
confidence  of  the  people  or  more  richly  deserved  the  regard  in  which 
he  was  held.  Mr.  Lunham  was  born  in  County  Cork,  Ireland,  No- 
vember 8,  1856,  a  son  of  Robert  and  Mary  (Darling)  Lunham,  na- 
tives of  Berwickshire,  Scotland.  He  came  of  old  established  Scotch 
families  prominent  in  the  history  of  Scotland  for  many  generations, 
and  he  fully  exemplified  those  sterling  characteristics  that  have  made 
the  sons  of  Scotland  and  their  descendants  not  only  forces  in  the 
upholding  of  the  highest  standard  of  loyal  citizenship  but  also  in  the 
control  and  directing  of  business  enterprises  of  broad  scope  and 
importance.  Mr.  Lunham  was  a  man  of  fine  intellectual  attainments 
and  exalted  integrity  of  character,  and  it  was  given  him  to  leave 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  209 

a  definite  and  benignant  impress  in  connection  with  important 
business  activities  in  the  city  of  Chicago,  as  well  as  to  exemplify 
that  high  sense  of  personal  responsibility  and  stewardship  which 
tend  to  make  for  usefulness  and  grateful  influence  in  all  relations 
of  life.  He  received  the  best  educational  advantages  in  his  youth, 
including  instruction  under  the  effective  preceptorship  of  private 
tutors  in  his  home  and  a  course  in  the  famous  Liverpool  Institute 
and  School  of  Arts.  The  fame  of  the  future  metropolis  of  the  west, 
which  seems,  not  unnaturally,  to  have  extended  to  Europe,  drew 
many  ambitious  young  men  like  himself  to  Chicago,  and  he  decided 
to  cast  in  his  lot  with  this  city.  It  was  in  1874  that  he  came  here 
to  carve  out  a  career  for  and  by  himself,  and  thenceforward  his 
life  and  enterprises  were  blended  with  the  growth  of  the  most 
wonderful  product  of  the  country's  western  civilization.  During 
his  business  career,  which  covered  nearly  forty  years,  he  reached 
a  broad  field  of  activity  and  usefulness,  and  no  citizen  of  his  day 
was  more  deeply  interested  in  the  material,  intellectual  and  moral 
progress  of  the  country.  For  a  number  of  years  he  was  closely 
identified  with  the  pork-packing  industry,  in  which  Chicago  has 
always  been  a  world  center.  He  also  conducted  an  extensive  busi- 
ness in  the  exporting  of  provisions,  together  with  a  substantial  and 
representative  commission  trade  in  grain  and  provisions.  Soon 
after  his  arrival  in  Chicago  in  1874,  Mr.  Lunham  became  asso- 
ciated in  business  in  the  firm  of  Boyd,  Lunham  and  Company,  and 
continued  in  pork  packing  until  1879,  when  he  disposed  of  his  pack- 
ing house  and  engaged  in  the  export  provision  trade  and  the  com- 
mission business  in  grain  and  provisions.  Until  July,  1896,  the 
firm  rented  the  Jones  and  Stiles  plant  at  the  Union  Stock  Yards,  but 
in  that  year  they  purchased  the  plant  formerly  owned  by  the  W.  H. 
Silberborn  Company,  and  here  Mr.  Lunham's  business  was  prac- 
tically centered  until  the  time  of  his  demise.  Besides  this  connec- 
tion he  was  identified  also  with  the  firm  of  Boyd,  Lunham  and  Com- 
pany, of  which  he  was  secretary,  treasurer,  director  and  assistant 
general  manager.  He  became  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade  in  1892,  and  continued  an  active  factor  in  this  organization 
until  his  death.  He  was  also  identified  with  the  Royal  Arcanum 
and  the  Colonial  Club,  and  was  a  zealous  and  liberal  member  and 
supporter  of  the  Presbyterian  Church.  In  his  political  affiliations 
Mr.  Lunham  was  a  stalwart  Republican,  but  took  no  active  part  in 
politics  aside  from  casting  the  weight  of  his  influence  in  support 
of  men  and  measures  working  for  the  public  good.  He  always  stood 
for  the  things  that  were  right,  and  for  the  advancement  of  citizen- 
ship, and  his  progressive  spirit  was  evident  in  many  ways.  He 
was  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  modern  improvements  along 
material,  intellectual  and  moral  lines,  and  in  the  promotion  of  char- 
itable movements  and  all  matters  tending  to  benefit  the  public  weal 
he  was  an  active  and  unostentatious  worker.     His  labors  were  not 


210  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

only  an  element  in  promoting  his  own  success,  but  also  constituted 
a  potent  factor  in  the  development  of  the  country,  and  his  influence 
was  all  the  more  efficacious  from  the  fact  that  it  was  moral  rather 
than  political,  and  was  exercised  for  the  public  welfare  as  well  as 
for  personal  ends.  Mr.  Lunham  was  married  in  Chicago,  June  29, 
1881,  to  Miss  Elmora  Hughes,  of  Louisville,  Kentucky,  a  woman 
of  great  mental  capacity  and  much  beauty  of  character,  and  they 
became  the  parents  of  five  children ;  Elmore  Ainslie,  Clayton  Wes- 
cott,  Elise  Frances,  Chester  Hughes  and  Robert  Thomas,  Jr.  The 
family  home  is  at  Everett,  Illinois,  and  is  a  hospitable  one  in  which 
Mr.  Lunham  delighted  in  entertaining  his  numerous  friends.  He 
was  devoted  to  the  pleasures  of  home  life  and  his  happiest  moments 
were  always  spent  at  his  own  fireside.  He  found  pleasure  in  pro- 
moting the  welfare  of  his  wife  and  children,  and  was  a  loving  hus- 
band and  indulgent  father.  In  business  life  he  was  alert,  sagacious 
and  reliable;  as  a  citizen  he  was  honorable,  prompt  and  true  to 
every  engagement,  and  his  death,  which  occurred  January  28, 
1913,  removed  from  Chicago  one  of  its  most  valued  citizens.  For 
thirty-nine  years  his  time  and  energy  was  devoted  to  the  building 
up  of  the  enterprise  with  which  he  was  associated  and  his  record 
stands  without  a  blemish.  His  career  was  one  of  which  his  family 
have  reason  to  be  proud,  for  never  was  a  man's  success  due  more 
to  his  own  native  ability  and  less  to  outward  circumstances.  His 
success  was  the  logical  sequence  of  the  natural  unfolding  and  de- 
velopment of  his  native  powers,  and  his  achievements  were  the  mer- 
ited  reward   of  earnest,   honest   efforts. 

Richard  S.  Lyon. — For  nearly  forty  years  the  firm  of  Merrill 
&  Lyon  has  found  prominent  representation  in  the  activities  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  of  which  important  body  J. 
Charles  F.  Merrill,  senior  member  of  the  firm,  has  the  distinction  of 
being  secretary,  and  the  junior  member,  whose  name  introduces 
this  paragraph,  is  one  of  the  veteran  and  honored  members  of  the 
board,  with  which  he  has  thus  been  identified  since  the  year  1880. 
Bringing  to  bear  in  his  relations  with  the  board  the  same  high  sense 
of  honor  and  integrity  that  characterizes  his  individual  business  ac- 
tivities, Mr.  Lyon,  like  his  valued  coadjutor,  Mr.  Merrill,  has  long 
been  influential  in  connection  with  the  government  and  general 
policies  of  this  great  commercial  body,  and  no  member  has  more 
secure  place  in  the  confidence  and  high  regard  of  its  constituent 
membership.  The  Board  of  Trade  has  manifested  its  appreciation  of 
his  ability  and  character  by  conferring  upon  him  the  highest  honors 
at  its  command.  Mr.  Lyon  served  as  a  member  of  its  directorate  from 
1892  to  1896,  in  which  latter  year  he  became  its  vice-president.  Of 
this  executive  office  he  continued  the  incumbent  until  1899,  when  he 
was  elected  president,  the  year  of  his  administration  having  been 
marked  by  wise  policies  and  progressive  methods,  and  the  traditions 
and  ideals  of  the  board  having  been  admirably  upheld  during  his 


: 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO 


211 


^ 


I 


•'•irf  executive.     Mr.  Lyon  stands  forth  as  of  the 

:ind  progressive  men  of  affairs  who  have  u  in  the 

'  the  marvelous  metropolis  of  the  west  ai5'    .     i  as  al- 

ijonent  of  fine  civic  ideals  and  of  the  clear  an.l  -     unch 

i'-iness  ethics.    The  firm  of  Merrill  &  Lvon  has  h.i      con- 

r?e  and  important  commission  and  shipping  bu.si  in 

II    *    i'ic.  and  its  inviolable  reputation  constitutes   i  ;st 

ii  asset.    Ric!  >  •      vvas  born  in  t'.       ty 

\nd,  Ohio,  on  : .  1843,  and  is        on 

liard  T.  and  Ellen  (Start  In  his  youti         .e- 

-  "— '     ' .--.J  ,;chsafed  by  t'      'act 

aectady,  Me  a       irk, 

ih  the  degree  of  Bachc:      of 

1..  _:iie  associated  with  busi    ;ss 

he  continued  to  maintain  his  ht  me 

Ued  his  associatiun 

has  long  found  i'.s 

I  i  center  m  tnis  city.    Since  1878  he  has  been  mc>\ 

gin.;-.,. ...  u.ai  successfully  associated  in  business  with  his  honor  o 

confrere,  J.  Charles  F.  Merrill,  at  present  secretary  of  the  Board  <)* 

Trade,  and  no  concern  in  the  commission  business  in  Chicago  has  a 

higher  reputation  than  the  firm  of  Merrill  &  Lyon.    Mr.  Lyon  is  a 

loyal  veteran  in  the  Cook  County  camp  of  the  Republican  party 

an'  ■ -       '  .  -  •..  .  I  . 1  ^-  of  the  University  Cln' 

a;  ed  as  president  in  J'P'Jt 

Both  he  auii  li  r  -^s  of  the   Presb^ 

<!;'irch  riiid  the  fa.:  itiful   suburban 


Maltby. —  \  igorous  anu  rc- 
•.s  pofxilrir  and  representati\ 
;ind  th; 

'■.■m  of  deii 

'  grain  operat 
fits  associa 
-  nineteen  _>    , 

rapher  for  the  firm  ol  Siorm= 
.    ......  .-  .,.■  \\!,;r.-.  -ounty,  li' 

-  of  the  L' 


.m  commi- 
■  ar  recor*^' 
•  f  Trade 


!/.ers  I 
he  rem 
again 
had  idei.t 


.    ,ith 
native 
';en 
.  of 
ni,  the 
panded 
d  with 
d  1902 
•  tensive 
rd,  Warren  & 
!   roster  of  tht 
:e  of  the  organ 
-    &  Comparr 
until  1911,  «v. 
nt   firm  with   wl 
v.hicago,  the   titlt- 


/^*  .., 


212  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

same  having  in  the  meanwhile  been  changed  to  its  present  form, 
Hulburd,  Warren  &  Chandler.  At  this  juncture  he  was  made  man- 
ager of  the  cash  grain  department  of  the  firm's  extensive  business, 
and  of  this  position  he  has  continued  the  efficient  and  valued  incum- 
bent up  to  the  present  time.  In  November,  1916,  Mr.  Maltby  be- 
came vice-president  of  the  corporation  of  T.  A.  Grier  &  Company, 
engaged  in  the  grain  business  at  Peoria,  and  in  addition  to  this  im- 
portant executive  association  he  is  likewise  a  director  of 
the  Kuehl-Lammers  Grain  &  Coal  Company,  of  Cedar  Rapids, 
Iowa.  The  political  allegiance  of  Mr.  Maltby  is  given  to  the  Demo- 
cratic party  and  in  a  social  way  he  holds  membership  in  the  Mid- 
lothian Country  Club.  On  the  30th  of  June,  1903,  was  solemnized 
the  marriage  of  Mr.  Maltby  to  Miss  Emma  Winner,  of  Carmi,  Illi- 
nois, and  they  have  two  children,  Helen  Louise  and  Truman  Win- 
ner. Reverting  to  the  earlier  stages  in  the  life  history  of  Mr.  Maltby, 
it  is  to  be  noted  that  he  was  born  on  a  farm  near  Virden,  Macoupin 
county,  Illinois,  and  that  the  date  of  his  nativity  was  April  23,  1872. 
He  is  a  son  of  Truman  Houghton  Maltby  and  Virginia  Minerva 
■(Vaughn)  Maltby,  his  second  personal  name  being  the  family  name 
■of  his  mother.  After  having  availed  himself  of  the  advantages  of 
the  public  schools  he  pursued  a  higher  course  of  study  in  Shurt- 
leff  College,  at  Upper  Alton,  Illinois,  and  his  association  with  the 
work  and  management  of  the  home  farm  continued  until  he  was 
nineteen  years  of  age,  when  he  initiated  his  business  career  at  Carmi, 
Illinois,  as  noted  in  a  preceding  paragraph.  But  although  the  larger 
portion  of  Mr.  Maltby's  business  interests  are  in  Chicago,  the  farm 
still  has  a  very  great  attraction  for  him,  and  he  now  lives  on  a 
magnificent  estate  twenty  miles  out  of  Chicago,  and  receives  much 
pleasure  and  recreation  from  his  fine  Kentucky  saddle  horses  and 
pure-bred  Holstein  cattle. 

George  E.  Marcy. — By  very  reason  of  his  being  a  representative 
on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  gigantic  interests  of  the  Armour  Grain 
Company,  of  which  he  is  president,  and  of  the  allied  department  of 
the  far  reaching  business  of  Armour  &  Company,  Mr.  Marcy  holds  a 
status  of  definite  precedence  and  influence  as  a  member  of  Chicago's 
great  commercial  body  to  which  this  history  is  devoted,  and  accord- 
ingly is  properly  given  individual  recognition  within  the  pages  of 
the  publication.  George  Edward  Marcy  takes  a  due  measure  of 
pride  and  satisfaction  in  reverting  to  Illinois  as  the  place  of  his  na- 
tivity and  as  the  stage  of  his  successful  activities  in  connection  with 
business  affairs  of  broad  scope  and  importance.  He  was  born  at 
Lockport  and  is  a  son  of  William  W.  and  Mary  (Dowse)  Marcy. 
who  removed  to  Chicago  when  he  was  about  12  years  of  age.  Thus 
it  is  that  Mr.  Marcy  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  the  western 
metropolis  for  his  early  educational  discipline,  and  it  is  equally  true 
that  his  advancement  to  a  position  of  prominence  as  one  of  the  veri- 
table captains  of  industry  in  Chicago  has  been  gained  by  work — by 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  213 

the  full  application  of  his  ability  and  energies  to  productive  achieve- 
ment that  has  not  lacked  objective  appreciation.  In  1879,  when  a 
lad  of  sixteen  years,  Mr.  Marcy  entered  upon  his  novitiate  in  the 
grain  commission  business,  by  assuming  a  modest  clerical  position 
with  the  firm  of  H.  W.  Rogers  &  Brother,  with  which  he  continued 
his  progressive  association  for  a  term  of  ten  years.  He  then,  in 
1889,  formed  his  alliance  with  the  great  concern  of  Armour  &  Com- 
pany, as  a  representative  of  the  grain  department  of  its  vast  busi- 
ness, and  has  since  continued  his  connection  with  this  important 
Chicago  concern,  with  which  he  has  found  ample  opportunity  for 
advancement  and  with  which  he  has  become  a  prominent  and  influ- 
ential executive,  as  president  of  the  Armour  Grain  Company,  a 
position  of  which  he  has  been  the  vigorous  and  resourceful  incum- 
bent since  1907.  Mr.  Marcy  is  a  director  of  the  Union  Trust  Com- 
pany, one  of  the  representative  financial  institutions  of  Chicago. 
In  a  fraternal  way  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Royal  Arcanum,  the  Na- 
tional Union  and  the  Royal  League,  and  the  representative  social 
organizations  that  number  him  as  a  member  are  the  Chicago  Club, 
Chicago  Athletic  Club,  Union  League,  Chicago  Automobile  Club, 
Kenwood  Club,  Exmoor  Club,  Onwentsia  Club,  Old  Elm  Club, 
Traffic  Club,  Industrial  Club,  and  South  Shore  Country  Club ;  and  is 
married. 

John  R.  Marfield. — Of  the  numerous  Minneapolis  grain  con- 
cerns represented  with  marked  consistency  on  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  the  City  of  Chicago  is  the  Marfield  Grain  Company,  which  is 
one  of  the  prominent  grain  commission  corporations  of  the  Minne- 
sota metropolis  and  of  which  John  R.  Marfield  is  president,  his 
membership  in  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  dating  from  the  year 
1896.  He  has  long  been  one  of  the  influential  members  of  the  Min- 
neapolis Chamber  of  Commerce,  of  which  he  has  served  as  presi- 
dent, and  he  is  similarly  affiliated  with  the  Duluth  Board  of  Trade. 
The  Marfield  Grain  Company  maintains  its  Minneapolis  offices  in 
suite  510-13  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  employment  is  given  to  a 
corps  of  about  forty  assistants.  John  R.  Marfield  was  born  in  Ohio, 
October  29,  1867,  and  is  a  son  of  Otho  L.  and  Agnes  (McMurray) 
Marfield.  The  father  was  for  many  years  extensively  engaged  in 
the  buying  and  shipping  of  grain  and  continued  to  be  actively  iden- 
tified with  this  line  of  commercial  enterprise  until  his  death,  which 
occurred  at  Winona,  Wisconsin,  on  the  26th  of  March,  1896.  He 
whose  name  introduces  this  review  gained  his  early  educational  dis- 
cipline in  the  public  schools,  and  his  higher  academic  training  was 
acquired  in  the  great  University  of  Michigan,  in  which  he  was  grad- 
uated as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1884,  and  from  which  he  received 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  the  same  year  he  became  as- 
sociated with  his  father  in  the  grain  business,  and  this  partnership 
continued  until  the  death  of  the  senior  member  in  1896.  The  Mar- 
field Grain  Company  is  duly  incorporated  under  the  laws  of  Minne- 


214  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

sota,  and  in  the  commission  grain  trade  has  developed  an  extensive 
business.  Mr.  Marfield  is  one  of  the  liberal  and  progressive  busi- 
ness men  of  Minneapolis,  is  a  Republican  in  his  political  allegiance, 
and  he  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  St.  Paul's  church,  Protes- 
tant Episcopal.  Mr.  Marfield  wedded  Miss  Helen  Horton,  a  daugh- 
ter of  Charles  Horton,  of  Winona,  Wisconsin,  and  they  have  three 
children. 

William  H.  Martin. — The  activities  of  Mr.  Martin  in  connec- 
tion with  the  brokerage  business  in  grain  have  touched  both  Chicago 
and  New  York  City,  and  in  the  national  metropolis  he  was  also  a 
successful  exponent  of  the  stock  and  general  investment  business. 
He  first  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago  in  the  year  1890,  when  he  came  from  New  York  City, 
where  he  had  initiated  his  activities  in  connection  with  a  brokerage 
enterprise  in  1884,  soon  after  leaving  college.  In  1906  he  resigned 
his  membership  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  and  from  that 
time  forward  until  about  the  close  of  1908  he  maintained  his  home 
in  New  York  City  and  was  an  active  member  of  the  New  York  Stock 
Exchange.  In  1909  he  returned  to  Chicago  and  was  re-elected  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  here  he  has  since  continued 
his  independent  and  definitely  successful  operations  as  a  broker  and 
general  commission  merchant.  From  1886  to  1892  he  was  a  member 
of  the  firm  of  Coster  &  Martin,  of  New  York,  and  from  1893  to  1895, 
inclusive,  he  was  there  one  of  the  interested  principals  in  the  firm 
of  McPherran,  Martin  &  Jackson.  His  experience  as  a  broker  has 
been  broad  and  varied  and  his  reputation  and  achievement  give  him 
excellent  vantage  place  as  one  of  the  popular  and  representative 
members  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade.  Mr.  Martin  was  born  in 
Brooklyn,  New  York,  on  the  8th  of  August,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of 
William  A  and  Margaret  (Myers)  Martin.  The  best  of  educational 
advantages  were  accorded  to  him  in  his  youth,  as  is  evidenced  by 
the  fact  that  in  1879  he  was  graduated  in  the  Brooklyn  Polytechnic 
Institute,  and  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1884  received  from  his- 
toric old  Williams  College  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  In 
Chicago  he  holds  membership  in  the  University  Club,  besides 
being  a  member  of  the  Indian  Hill  Country  Club,  and  both  he  and 
his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church.  In 
1891  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Martin  to  Miss  Lilla 
Burch,  of  Brooklyn,  New  York,  and  they  have  two  sons,  Briton 
and  John.  Mr.  Martin  has  always  manifested  an  active  and  loyal 
interest  in  the  welfare  and  advancement  of  the  great  commercial 
institution  with  which  he  is  connected  and  at  the  annual  election 
of  the  Board  of  Trade,  held  January  9,  1917,  he  was  elected  to  serve 
for  a  period  of  three  years,  as  a  director. 

Alvin  E.  Masten. — To  men  of  such  energy,  initiative  power, 
and  determined  purpose  as  those  possessed  by  Alvin  Emmett  Mas- 
ten,  success  comes  as  a  natural  prerogative,  and  thus  it  has  been 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  215 

his  to  gain  in  the  grain  and  stock  brokerage  business  a  substan- 
tial, well  ordered  and  prosperous  business.  In  the  city  of 
Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania,  he  is  a  senior  member  of  the  brokerage 
firm  of  A.  E.  Hasten  &  Company,  in  which  his  partners  are  Fred- 
erick C.  Masten  and  George  M.  Parsley.  The  firm  maintains  branch 
offices  in  Wheeling,  West  Virginia,  and  Cleveland,  Ohio,  and  em- 
ployment is  given  about  thirty  office  and  executive  assistants.  The 
Pittsburgh  offices  of  the  iirm  are  at  323  Fourth  avenue,  and  mem- 
bership is  retained  not  only  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago,  but  also  the  Chicago  Stock  Exchange,  the  Pittsburgh 
Stock  Exchange,  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange,  and  the  Boston 
Stock  Exchange.  As  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  Mr. 
Masten  has  retained  a  seat  in  this  great  commercial  organization 
for  several  years,  and  it  is  gratifying  to  accord  to  him  specific  recog- 
nition in  this  history.  Mr.  Masten  was  born  in  Ohio,  on  the  3d  of 
April,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of  Lannain  and  Harriet  (Santee)  Masten. 
The  father  followed  the  vocation  of  farmer  in  his  earlier  life  but 
finally  prepared  himself  for  and  entered  the  legal  profession,  of 
which  he  became  a  prominent  and  successful  representative  in  the 
Buckeye  state,  he  having  been  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  in 
Ohio,  at  the  time  of  his  death,  in  1882.  To  the  public  schools  of 
his  native  state  Alvin  E.  Masten  is  indebted  for  his  early  education 
and  at  the  very  inception  of  his  business  career  he  brought  to  bear 
the  energy  and  insistent  determination  that  have  characterized  his 
entire  active  career.  He  has  been  identified  with  the  grain  com- 
mission business  since  January,  1891,  and  he  made  each  successive 
stage  of  experience  count  in  accumulation  of  valuable  knowledge,  so 
that  he  was  amply  fortified  when  he  organized  in  Pittsburgh  the 
firm  of  A.  E.  Masten  &  Company,  which  now  holds  an  influential 
position  in  the  grain  and  stock  brokerage  business  in  Pittsburgh, 
Wheeling  and  Cleveland,  and  which  has  secure  status  on  each  of 
the  metropolitan  exchanges  and  commercial  bodies  with  which  it 
is  identified,  as  above  noted.  Mr.  Masten  is  a  Republican  in  poli- 
tics, takes  loyal  interest  in  public  affairs,  both  national  and  local, 
and  is  a  progressive  citizen  as  well  as  business  man.  He  is  affiliated 
with  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  is  identified  with  various  civic 
and  social  organizations  of  prominent  order.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  as  was  also  his  wife,  who  died  in 
January,  1917.  The  maiden  name  of  Mrs.  Masten  was  Ada  John- 
ston, and  she  was  a  daughter  of  L.  W.  Johnston,  of  Newcastle,  Penn- 
sylvania. Of  the  two  children  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Masten  the  elder 
is  William  S.,  and  the  younger  is  Thalia,  who  is  the  wife  of  George 
A.  Hoover,  of  Pittsburgh. 

John  R.  Mauff,  second  vice-president  of  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade  and  for  three  years  one  of  its  directors,  is  a  native  of 
Chicago,  having  been  born  in  this  city,  July  16,  1868.  He  is  a  son 
of  Frederick  and  Nora  Mauff  and  the  first  twenty  years  of  his  life 


216  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

were  spent  in  the  growing  city  from  whose  energy  and  purposeful- 
ness  he  seems  to  have  drawn  the  inspiration  for  his  owri  success. 
He  was  a  lad  of  three  years  when  the  great  fire  devastated  the 
city,  but  he  has  vivid  memories  of  that  time  of  trial  and  of  suffering 
for  all  Chicagoans.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  the 
city  and  as  soon  as  school  days  were  finished  he  started  his  busi- 
ness career  at  the  foot  of  the  ladder,  in  the  clerical  force  of  Field, 
Leiter  &  Company.  He  was  later  employed  in  a  higher  capacity 
by  Foss,  Strong  &  Company,  and  it  was  here  that  he  met  the  man 
who  was  to  have  such  influence  upon  his  life.  This  man  was  Joseph 
Reynolds,  "Diamond  Jo" ;  noted  through  all  the  Upper  Mississippi 
region  as  the  owner  of  the  "Diamond  Jo"  packet  line  and  as  the 
most  extensive  grain  dealer  in  that  part  of  the  country.  Mr.  Rey- 
nolds had  business  connections  in  Chicago  and  was  a  frequent 
visitor  in  the  city.  A  large  part  of  his  great  success  lay  in  his  ability 
to  pick  his  lieutenants  and  to  hold  them  to  him  with  bonds  of  friend- 
ship and  admiration,  stronger  than  any  mere  business  relation.  He 
was  a  man  of  simple  habits  and  of  the  greatest  democracy,  and  every 
employe  was  his  personal  friend.  Mr.  Reynolds  took  note  of  this 
quick,  alert  young  clerk,  who,  even  at  the  age  of  less  than  twenty, 
seemed  to  have  a  thorough  and  technical  knowledge  of  the  grain 
business,  and  it  was  characteristic  of  his  business  genius  that  when 
he  needed  some  man  to  take  charge  of  his  vast  country  elevator 
and  grain  business  in  Iowa,  Minnesota  and  Wisconsin,  he  should 
select  this  young  man  whose  ability  had  impressed  him  during  his 
Chicago  visits.  Thus  it  was  that  Mr.  Maufi',  before  he  had  cast  a 
vote,  found  himself  secretary  of  the  E.  M.  Dickey  Company,  by 
which  the  Reynolds'  grain  business  was  known,  with  headquarters 
at  Dubuque,  Iowa.  Mr.  Mauf?  was  the  manager  of  these  interests 
from  1888  to  1891.  His  work  took  him  through  all  the  territory 
in  which  the  concern  operated  and  gave  him  a  first-hand  knowledge 
of  grain  "from  the  ground  up,"  besides  giving  him  a  wide  acquaint- 
ance with  farmers  and  grain  dealers  and  a  broad  understanding  of 
their  viewpoint, — which  have  been  of  great  value  to  him.  He  also 
became  the  trusted  and  confidential  friend  of  Mr.  Reynolds  and  when 
that  gentleman,  whose  mining  interests  were  large,  decided  to 
withdraw  from  the  grain  business,  it  was  Mr.  Mauif  who  had  charge 
of  closing  the  affairs  of  the  company.  The  friendship  with  Mr. 
Reynolds  lasted  throughout  the  latter's  life  and  Mr.  Mauff  was  one 
of  those  trusted  with  the  settlement  of  the  Reynolds  estate.  Upon 
leaving  Dubuque  it  was  very  natural  that  he  should  return  to  his 
native  city,  this  he  did,  and  became  Secretary  of  the  Chicago  O'Neill 
Grain  Company,  remaining  with  the  concern  until  it  closed  its 
affairs.  During  these  years  Mr.  Mauff  was  becoming  better  known 
as  a  grain  expert  and  was  considered  one  of  the  best  judges  of  bar- 
ley in  the  Chicago  market.  It  was  this  reputation  which  brought 
him  in  contact  with  Adolphus  Busch,  and  for  several  years  he  acted 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  217 

as  barley  expert  for  the  great  brewing  concern.  On  the  death  of 
Mr.  Busch,  Mr.  Mauff  severed  his  connection  with  the  company  and 
became  connected  with  the  National  Consumers  League  with  head- 
quarters in  New  York  City.  This  was  during  the  great,  nation-wide 
fight  for  the  passage  of  "pure  food"  legislation,  and  Mr.  MaulT,  who 
also  represented  the  barley  growers  of  Minnesota  and  Wisconsin, 
was  the  leading  spirit  in  insisting  that  brewery  products,  likewise, 
should  be  truthfully  labelled.  It  had  been  the  custom  of  some 
brewers  to  print  on  the  labels  the  names  of  such  ingredients  as  bar- 
ley and  hops,  but  to  omit  all  mention  of  other  ingredients  which  they 
did  not  care  to  make  public.  The  league  insisted  that  all  the  in- 
gredients, or  none,  should  be  printed,  and  that  all  should  be  given 
equal  prominence.  Mr.  Mauff  collected  the  data  for  this  crusade, 
prepared  the  bill,  took  it  before  Dr.  Wiley,  defended  it  at  many 
hearings,  with  success,  and  it  was  largely  through  his  efforts  that 
it  became  promulgated  as  a  regulation  of  the  law  enacted  June  30, 
1906.  Returning  to  Chicago  Mr.  Mauff  entered  the  general  grain 
business  as  a  barley  expert,  in  which  lines  he  has  continued. 
His  membership  in  the  Board  of  Trade  dates  from  December  10, 
1896.  Nothing  could  speak  more  highly  of  the  esteem  in  which 
he  is  held  by  the  members  than  the  fact  that  after  he  had  been  for 
three  years  a  director  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  he  was  chosen  as 
second  vice-president,  at  the  election  of  1916.  The  office  of  second 
vice-president  of  the  Board  of  Trade  is  not  simply  an  honorary  or 
perfunctory  title,  it  carries  with  it  large  responsibility  and  many 
definite  duties  and  to  these  Mr.  Mauff  devotes  a  large  portion  of 
his  time,  with  the  result  that  he  is  entitled  to  his  share  of  the 
credit  for  the  present  very  successful  administration  of  the  Board's 
affairs.  Mr.  Mauff  resides  at  Evanston,  where  his  family  con- 
sists of  his  wife,  whose  maiden  name  was  Georgia  Estelle  Dyer, 
and  their  two  delightful  children,  Catharine  Estelle,  aged  ten,  and 
John  Reginald,  Jr.,  aged  four  years. 

John  C.  Maxwell,  M.  D. — In  its  recorded  history  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  has  claimed  among  its  active  members 
comparatively  few  who  have  previously  gained  success  and  prestige 
in  the  medical  profession,  and  of  this  contingent  Dr.  Maxwell  is  a 
representative.  Even  as  he  proved  in  definite  success  his  ability 
as  a  physician  and  surgeon,  so  has  he  shown  aggressiveness  and 
resourcefulness  in  connection  with  the  grain  commission  trade, 
and  in  1915  he  became  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade, 
through  the  medium  of  which  he  has  greatly  furthered  the  inter- 
ests of  the  well-known  commission  firm  of  Maxwell  &  Quinleven, 
of  which  he  is  the  senior  member  and  the  offices  and  central  business 
stage  of  which  are  maintained  at  Sterling,  Whiteside  county,  Illi- 
nois, William  P.  Quinleven  being  the  junior  member  of  the  firm. 
Dr.  Maxwell,  one  of  a  family  of  eleven  children,  was  born  in  Illinois, 
April  29,  1866,  and  is  a  son  of  Archibald  and  Elizabeth   (Allison) 


218  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Maxwell,  the  father,  who  was  born  in  Scotland,  having  become 
one  of  the  representative  farmers  and  highly  honored  citizens  of 
this  state.  Continuing  his  studies  in  the  public  schools  until  he  had 
completed  the  course  prescribed  in  the  high  school,  Dr.  Maxwell 
followed  eventually  the  bent  of  his  ambition  and  began  preparing 
himself  for  the  exacting  profession  of  medicine.  He  was  graduated 
in  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of  Illinois,  from  which 
he  received  his  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine.  Thereafter  he  was 
engaged  in  the  active  and  successful  practice  of  his  profession  until 
he  established  himself  in  the  grain  brokerage  business,  in  1915, 
his  field  of  medical  activity  having  been  principally  in  Whiteside 
county,  even  as  he  there  maintains  his  headquarters  as  an  able 
and  successful  exponent  of  the  grain  business.  His  partnership  alli- 
ance with  Mr.  Quinleven  was  formed  in  June,  1915,  and  within  the 
intervening  period  they  have  developed  a  substantial  business  of 
the  most  legitimate  order  and  of  constantly  cumulative  tendencies. 
In  politics  the  Doctor  is  a  Republican,  and  he  formerly  maintained 
active  affiliation  with  various  medical  organizations,  including  the 
American  Medical  Association  and  the  Illinois  State  Medical  Society, 
He  is  one  of  the  well-known  and  representative  citizens  of  White- 
side county  and  both  consistency  and  satisfaction  are  aflforded  in 
according  to  him  recognition  in  this  history  of  the  great  commercial 
organization  with  which  he  has  identified  himself  in  the  western 
metropolis.  Dr.  Maxwell  wedded  Miss  Julia  Guinther,  daughter 
of  John  Guinther,  a  resident  of  Illinois  and  a  native  of  Germany. 
Robert  McDougal. — This  successful  grain  broker  is  a  member 
of  the  firm  of  Knight  &  McDougal,  New  York  and  Chicago.  The 
senior  partner  of  the  firm  is  William  Knight,  who  is  in  New  York. 
Mr.  McDougal  was  born  in  Peoria,  Illinois,  October  25,  1868.  His 
father  was  born  in  New  York  state,  and  his  grandfather  in  Scotland. 
His  mother's  parents  were  born  in  the  north  of  Ireland.  Mr.  Mc- 
Dougal was  educated  in  the  public  schools,  graduating  from  the 
Peoria,  Illinois,  High  School  in  1887.  At  that  time  he  entered  the 
employ  of  Hancock  &  Company,  of  Philadelphia,  operating  a  branch 
house  in  Peoria;  in  1894  he  represented  that  firm  in  Chicago  on 
the  Board  of  Trade.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
since  that  time.  He  was  in  the  employ  of  Bartlett,  Frazier  Com- 
pany of  Chicago  from  1895  to  1896,  and  the  remainder  of  the  time, 
from  1896  up  to  the  present  date,  he  has  been  with  or  of  the  firm 
of  Otto  E.  Lohrke  &  Company,  New  York  grain  brokers,  and  its 
successors,  the  present  firm  of  Knight  &  McDougal.  Mr.  Mc- 
Dougal and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  ICenwood  Evangelical 
church  of  Chicago.  He  is  a  member  of  leading  clubs  of  the  city, 
and  was  president  of  the  Kenwood  Club  in  1908-9.  On  the  9th  of 
April,  1902,  Mr.  McDougal  wedded  Miss  Mary  Persis  Bouton,  of 
Chicago,  and  they  have  two  sons,  Robert  Bouton  and  Christopher 
Bouton  McDougal. 


I 


.  rV  OF  CHICAGO 

.    — In  all  of  the   relations  of  a   si, 

the  late  Alexander   McDougall  exein 

-     haracteristics  that  have  so  sign!:-. 

n  he  was  sprung.     }lv  was  a  youn 

Illinois  and  it  was  his  i 

,    ,. -J    in   connection    with   the    ;.  ._ 

ture,  to  which  he  was  pleased  to  resutne  alle- 
'  '       '  '       '        '  '  'iile  he  has 

■n  business 
member  of  the   Board 

.....   ;... ..;i:ch  revert  with  satisfac- 

ving  numbered  him  among  their  friends,  the  while  they 

■  charact-  ''nt 

ommeri  ni- 

ougal)  was  born 

.S3S,  and  was  a 

.11,  both  rep'vs.  nta- 

'   <..;   bcMinvh   Image  and  of  fanv  -ly 

The  parents  came  to  the  Unitt  in 

18.53  and  settled  at  Lakeside,  Illinois,  the  father  becoming  one  of 

the  substantial  and  successful  farmers  of  Lake  County,  when;  lioth 

he  and  his  wife  passed  the  residue  of  their  lives.     The  early  chica- 

tionai  advantages  of- Alexander  McDot;  '  those  of  <'o'=t 

]c\'?.   \radi-niv  in  It!';  niJivi-  r';^    nr'.  h.  -evetitcen  years 

He  continued 

farm,  in  Lake 

re  he  serve-.i  as 

Iter  part  '>i  the 

-'   V,    vuiad- 

'iis  ca- 

of  the 

hicago 

,  with  which  n^  ntified 

.\|,^..,    ■►  .  home- 

ssocia- 
^en  su- 
Ueston, 

ed  the 


sr^: 
th. 

o[ 

lished 
grain  ' 


niself  wif 


\  representatn ' 
'   ■■   successful  ' 


^ 


220  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

that  was  founded  upon  fair  and  honorable  dealings,  he  was  loyal  in 
the  support  and  furtherance  of  the  best  interests  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  and  commanded  at  all  times  the  unqualified  respect  and 
esteem  of  its  members.  He  was  a  man  of  modesty  and  reserve 
but  those  who  came  within  the  sphere  of  his  influence  recognized 
the  nobility  of  his  character  and  the  exceptional  ability  that  was  his. 
Mr.  McDougall  continued  his  business  in  Chicago  until  the  time 
of  his  death  and  was  one  of  the  veteran  members  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  when  he  was  summoned  from  the  stage  of  his  mortal  en- 
deavors, at  his  residence  in  Highland  Park,  on  the  8th  day  of  July, 
1913.  He  was  a  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen,  gave  his  political 
support  to  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party,  and  his  religious  faith, 
exemplified  in  his  daily  life  but  with  all  of  tolerance,  was  that  of  the 
Presbyterian  church.  The  business  which  he  established  is  still 
continued  under  his  name  and  is  now  controlled  by  his  elder  son, 
John  D.  McDougall,  of  whom  specific  mention  is  made  following 
this  sketch.  On  the  17th  of  May,  1862,  was  solemnized  the  marriage 
of  Mr.  McDougall  to  Miss  Ella  Louisa  Randall,  who  is  now  de- 
ceased, and  the  three  children  who  survive  him  are  John  D.,  Alfred 
A.  and  Margaret  L. 

John  D.  McDougall. — Filial  loyalty  and  appreciation  have  been 
significantly  shown  by  this  well-known  member  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  in  his  having  retained  the  name  of  his  father  in  conducting 
the  substantial  and  well  ordered  grain  commission  business  that 
was  established  by  the  latter  more  than  thirty  years  ago,  and  with 
which  he  himself  has  been  actively  identified  during  virtually  this 
entire  period.  To  the  honored  father,  the  late  Alexander  McDou- 
gall, memorial  tribute  is  paid  on  other  pages  of  this  publication, 
and  thus  further  reference  to  the  family  history  is  not  demanded  in 
the  present  connection.  The  commission  business  that  is  conducted 
under  the  name  of  its  founder,  Alexander  McDougall,  continued  to 
enlist  the  personal  attention  of  the  latter  until  he  passed  to  the 
life  eternal,  on  the  8th  day  of  July,  1913,  and  from  its  inception,  in 
1885,  up  to  the  present  time  there  has  been  no  cessation  of  business 
for  a  single  day,  so  that  there  is  all  of  consistency  in  perpetuation 
through  the  same  the  name  of  one  who  long  held  secure  place  as 
one  of  the  most  honored  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  the  while 
it  may  likewise  be  said  that  as  a  citizen  and  man  of  afifairs  the  son 
has  fully  upheld  the  prestige  of  the  name  which  he  bears.  John 
Douglas  McDougall  takes  a  due  measure  of  satisfaction  in  revert- 
ing to  Chicago  as  the  place  of  his  nativity  as  well  as  the  stage  of 
his  activities  during  the  entire  course  of  his  business  career.  He 
was  born  November  30,  1862,  and  his  early  education  was  acquired 
in  the  public  schools  of  Illinois  and  Minnesota,  with  supplemental 
discipline  gained  by  taking  an  effective  course  in  a  business  college 
in  his  native  city.  He  became  associated  with  his  father  in  the 
commission  grain  business  in  Chicago  in  1885,  soon  after  having  at- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  221 

lained  to  his  legal  majority,  and  he  has  been  an  active  and  valued 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  June  2,  1886.  As  previously 
intimated  he  succeeded  to  the  control  of  the  old  established  business 
upon  the  death  of  his  revered  father,  in  1913.  He  takes  a  lively  in- 
terest in  all  things  pertaining  to  the  welfare  of  his  native  city, 
and  is  fully  appreciative  of  the  traditions,  functions  and  honorable 
history  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  the  great  commercial  organization 
with  which  he  has  been  identified  for  fully  three  decades.  On  the 
11th  of  August,  1901,  Mr.  McDougall  wedded  Miss  Elise  DeMourer, 
and  their  home  is  in  the  beautiful  suburb  of  Highland  Park.  They 
have  no  children. 

Caleb  L.  McKee. — In  the  year  1901  was  formed  in  the  city  of 
Columbus,  Ohio,  the  firm  of  Caleb  L.  McKee  &  Company,  and  in  the 
same  year  its  executive  head,  Mr.  McKee,  became  a  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago.  The  other  interested 
principals  of  the  concern  are  William  R.  A.  Hays  and  Samuel  L. 
Landen,  and  the  firm  has  developed  a  substantial  commission  busi- 
ness in  the  handling  of  stocks,  bonds  and  grain,  with  representation 
not  only  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  but  also  the  New  York 
Stock  Exchange,  the  Cleveland  Stock  Exchange,  the  Colum- 
bus Stock  Exchange  and  the  Pittsburgh  Stock  Exchange. 
It  may  be  said  without  fear  of  legitimate  denial  that  the 
firm  of  Caleb  L.  McKee  &  Company  now  controls  the 
most  extensive  commission  business  of  all  similar  concerns  in 
the  state  of  Ohio,  and  that  the  enterprise  is  founded  upon  honor 
and  conducted  with  progressiveness  and  discrimination,  as  its  repu- 
tation fully  indicates.  The  firm  maintains  its  well-equipped  offices 
in  the  Wyandotte  building,  Columbus,  and  employment  is  given  to 
a  corps  of  eighteen  assistants.  Caleb  L.  McKee  was  born  in  Co- 
lumbus, Ohio,  November  9,  1866,  and  is  a  son  of  James  M.  and 
Indiana  (Lodge)  McKee.  The  father  likewise  was  born  and  reared 
in  Ohio  and  was  for  many  years  a  prosperous  merchant  and  repre- 
sentative citizen  of  Columbus,  where  his  death  occurred  in  the  year 
1895,  his  business  having  been  for  many  years  conducted  on  the 
same  premises  on  which  are  established  the  present  office  head- 
quarters of  the  firm  of  Caleb  L.  McKee  &  Company,  and  it  may 
well  be  said  that  as  a  business  man  and  loyal  and  liberal  citizen 
the  son  is  upholding  the  prestige  of  the  family  name  in  Ohio's  cap- 
ital city.  After  receiving  the  discipline  of  the  public  schools  Caleb 
L.  McKee  attended  the  University  of  Ohio,  in  his  native  city,  and 
he  completed  his  higher  academic  course  in  historic  old  Williams 
College,  Massachusetts.  For  a  short  time  after  leaving  college  he 
was  identified  with  the  mortgage  and  loan  business  in  Columljus, 
and  here  he  has  made  substantial  advancement  as  an  able  and  reli- 
able business  man,  as  shown  by  the  scope  and  importance  of  the 
properous  enterprise  of  which  he  is  now  the  executive  head.  He 
takes  lively  interest  in  all  things  tending  to  advance  the  civic  and 


222  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

material  prosperity  of  his  home  city,  is  a  staunch  supporter  of  the 
cause  of  the  Republican  party  and  both  he  and  his  wife  are  mem- 
bers of  the  Presbyterian  church.  His  wife  was  Miss  Ida  Smith, 
a  daughter  of  Joseph  Smith,  of  Columbus,  and  the  one  child  of  this 
union  is  Miss  Indiana  L.  McKee,  who  remains  at  the  parental  home. 

John  D.  McMillan. — Even  as  Chicago  is  recognized  as  the 
world's  center  of  the  commercial  phase  of  the  grain  business  so  is 
Minneapolis  known  as  the  most  important  primary  headquarters 
of  this  all-important  line  of  industrial  enterprise.  Thus  there  is 
much  consistency  in  the  fact  that  the  Minnesota  metropolis  gives 
a  very  appreciable  and  loyal  contingent  of  members  to  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade,  and  prominent  among  the  number  is  Mr.  McMillan, 
who  is  president  of  the  Osborne-McMillan  Elevator  Company, 
which  owns  and  operates  in  Minneapolis  the  Shoreham  elevator, 
with  a  capacity  of  750,000  bushels,  besides  maintaining  a  chain  of 
well  equipped  country  elevators  on  the  lines  of  the  Great  Northern 
and  the  Minneapolis,  St.  Paul  &  Sault  Ste.  Marie  Railroads.  The 
company  built  and  operates  also  the  Empire  and  Northland  elevat- 
ors and  has  extensive  holdings  in  the  International  Elevator  Com- 
pany, which  controls  a  large  and  important  business  in  the  great 
wheat  producing  regions  of  the  Canadian  northwest.  The  com- 
pany operates  about  one  hundred  and  fifty  elevators,  gives  employ- 
ment to  an  approximate  force  of  three  hundred  and  fifty  persons, 
and  its  finely  appointed  Minneapolis  offices  are  in  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce  building.  Mr.  McMillan  was  born  in  the  city  of  La- 
Crosse,  Wisconsin,  a  son  of  John  and  Mary  (Leach)  McMillan,  his 
father  having  been  one  of  the  early  and  extensive  lumber  operators 
in  the  Badger  state.  John  D.  McMillan  gained  his  early  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  and  as  a  young  man  he  there 
entered  the  employ  of  the  Cargill  Brothers  Elevator  Company,  with 
which  he  continued  his  alliance  about  ten  years.  He  then  sought  a 
broader  field  of  operations  in  which  he  could  assume  an  independent 
status,  and  thus  it  was  that,  in  1892,  he  removed  to  Minneapolis 
and  became  one  of  the  founders  of  the  extensive  business  now  con- 
trolled by  the  Osborne-McMillan  Elevator  Company,  of  which  he 
is  president  and  of  which  he  has  been  a  representative  on  the  Chi- 
cago Board  of  Trade  for  many  years.  He  is  also  one  of  the  promi- 
nent members  of  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce,  is  simi- 
larly identified  with  the  Duluth  Board  of  Trade,  and  in  his  home  city 
he  is  listed  as  a  member  of  various  fraternal  organizations  and 
leading  clubs,  including  the  Minikahda  Club  and  the  Minneapolis 
Golf  Club,  his  political  support  being  given  to  the  Republican  party. 
Mr.  McMillan  was  married  to  Miss  Grace  Ives. 

Matthew  K.  McMullin. — In  March,  1917,  the  city  of  Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania,  gained  a  vigorous  representative  on  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade,  for  it  was  at  that  time  that  the  senior  member  of 
the  well-known  grain  and  tobacco  brokerage  firm  of  M.  K.  McMul- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  223 

lin  &  Company  assumed  membership  in  the  great  commercial  body 
of  this  city.  The  firm  does  a  successful  brokerage  business  in  stocks 
as  well  as  grain,  tobacco,  etc.,  and  owns  a  membership  on  the  New 
York  Stock  Exchange.  Matthew  K.  McMullin,  whose  partner  in 
the  firm  of  M.  K.  McMullin  &  Company  is  J.  D.  Callery,  was  born 
in  the  city  of  Wheeling,  West  Virginia,  on  the  11th  of  September, 
1848,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Sarah  McMullin,  who  there  estab- 
lished their  home  when  the  place  was  little  more  than  a  village. 
Matthew  K.  McMullin  is  indebted  to  the  schools  of  his  native  city 
for  his  early  education  and  as  a  young  man  he  there  identified  him- 
self with  the  tobacco  business.  In  this  department  of  business  enter- 
prise he  eventually  won  secure  vantage  ground  and  definite  success, 
and  in  1890  he  amplified  his  operations  by  engaging  also  in  the  stock 
and  grain  brokerage  business.  He  established  his  residence  in 
Pittsburgh,  and  there  he  has  been  the  senior  member  of  the  broker- 
age firm  of  M.  K.  McMullin  &  Company  since  1905.  The  firm  has 
membership  on  the  Pittsburgh  Stock  Exchange,  and  in  its  well- 
appointed  offices  is  retained  an  average  corps  of  twelve  employes. 
In  politics  Mr.  McMullin  is  a  staunch  Republican,  he  is  identified 
with  various  fraternal  and  social  organizations,  and  he  and  his 
family  hold  the  faith  of  the  Catholic  church.  The  maiden  name  of 
Mrs.  McMullin  was  Anna  Nolan,  and  she  is  a  daughter  of  the  late 
Garrett  Nolan,  of  Wheeling,  West  Virginia. 

Arthur  Meeker. — In  all  stages  of  its  history  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  the  City  of  Chicago  has  claimed  as  members  the  strongest  and 
best  element  in  the  industrial  and  commercial  as  well  as  the  civic  life 
of  the  western  metropolis,  and  one  of  the  representative  Chicago 
citizens  whose  name  is  found  on  the  membership  rolls  of  the  Board 
at  the  present  time  is  Arthur  Meeker,  concerning  whose  prominence 
and  influence  in  connection  with  large  and  important  affairs  in 
Chicago  it  is  not  necessary  to  enter  into  details  in  this  connection. 
Consistency,  however,  demands  that  in  this  history  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  his  name  shall  not  be  permitted  to  go  without  mention. 
Arthur  Meeker  was  born  in  Chicago,  on  the  11th  of  April,  1866, 
and  is  a  son  of  Arthur  B.  and  Maria  L.  (Griggs)  Meeker.  In  1886 
he  received  from  the  Sheffield  Scientific  School  of  Yale  University 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science.  He  has  large  and  varied  capi- 
talistic interests  in  Chicago,  is  a  Director  of  the  great  corporation 
of  Armour  &  Co.,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  Mr. 
Meeker  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trustees  of  the  University  of 
Illinois,  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church, 
and  he  is  identified  with  the  Chicago  Club,  the  University  Club, 
the  Mid-Day  Club,  the  Saddle  &  Cycle  Club,  the  Onwentsia  Club, 
besides  which  he  holds  membership  in  the  Racquet  &  Tennis  Club 
of  New  York  City.  "Arcady,"  the  country  home  of  the  Meeker 
family,  is  one  of  the  most  idyllic  farms  of  the  beautiful  Lake  Forest 
district,  and  is  one  of  the  best  and  most  favorably  known  dairy 


224  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

farms  producing  certified  milk.     In  1892,  Mr.  Meeker  wedded  Miss 
Grace  Murray,  of  Chicago. 

Meent  R.  Meents. — In  connection  with  the  splendid  production 
of  grain  in  the  State  of  Illinois  there  has  been  afforded  the  best  of 
opportunity  for  the  disposition  of  the  product  through  proper  com- 
mercial sources,  and  to  bring  to  bear  this  necessary  incidental  force 
the  interposition  of  many  men  of  fine  energy,  sterling  integrity  and 
exceptional  business  ability  has  been  enlisted.  He  whose  name 
introduces  this  article  came  from  his  German  fatherland  when  a 
youth  and  established  his  home  in  Iroquois  County,  Illinois,  where 
through  his  own  ability  and  well-ordered  endeavors  he  has  won 
advancement  to  a  position  of  prominence  and  influence  as  one  of 
the  substantial  captains  of  industry  in  this  section  of  the  State.  He 
is  now  the  head  of  the  firm  of  M.  R.  Meents  &  Sons,  engaged  exten- 
sively in  the  grain,  lumber  and  coal  trade,  with  well-equipped  grain 
elevators  at  Ashkum,  Clifton  and  Danforth,  Iroquois  County,  and  at 
Cullom,  Livingston  County.  He  whose  name  introduces  this  para- 
graph was  the  founder  of  the  now  extensive  business  and  has  been 
a  resident  of  Iroquois  County  for  nearly  half  a  century.  He  main- 
tains his  home  in  the  village  of  Ashkum  and  gives  his  personal 
supervision  to  the  affairs  of  the  Ashkum  Bank,  of  which  he  is 
President.  Meent  R.  Meents  was  born  in  Ostfriesland,  Germany, 
June  15,  1851,  and  is  a  son  of  Remmer  H.  and  Ocke  (Ulfers)  Meents, 
both  of  whom  died  in  Germany,  the  father  having  there  been  a 
farmer  by  occupation.  The  subject  of  this  review  acquired  his 
youthful  education  in  his  native  land  and  on  the  12th  of  May,  1869, 
about  one  month  prior  to  his  eighteenth  birthday  anniversary,  he 
landed  in  the  United  States.  Making  his  way  to  Illinois,  he  re- 
mained a  short  time  at  Danforth,  Iroquois  County,  and  then  became 
identified  with  farm  enterprise  in  the  vicinity  of  his  present  home 
village  of  Ashkum.  From  small  beginnings  he  has  risen  to  a  com- 
manding position  as  one  of  the  substantial  men  of  affairs  in  this 
county  and  as  a  citizen  of  steadfast  integrity  of  purpose  as  well  as 
one  of  liberality  and  progressiveness.  Since  1885  he  has  been 
engaged  in  the  grain  business,  of  which  he  is  now  one  of  the  leading 
representatives  in  this  part  of  the  State,  and  he  has  been  successful 
also  as  a  practical  financier  who  has  impregnable  place  in  popular 
confidence  and  esteem  in  Iroquois  County.  He  engaged  in  the  bank- 
ing business  in  Ashkum  in  1892,  and  here  the  Ashkum  Bank,  of 
which  he  is  the  President,  and  his  sons,  R.  R.  and  A.  J.,  cashier  and 
auditor  respectively,  operates  upon  a  capital  stock  of  $25,000.  Mr. 
Meents  is  a  stalwart  and  well-fortified  advocate  of  the  principles 
of  the  Republican  party,  he  is  a  charter  member  of  the  Ashkum 
Camp  of  the  Woodmen  of  the  World  and  also  of  the  local  lodge 
of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  Both  he  and  his  wife 
are  zealous  members  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  Mr. 
Meents  has  been  most  appreciative  of  and  loyal  to  that  great  Chicago 


^unt0// ^fi&s^ina   ^ir 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO 

he  Board  of  Trade,  and  has  been  a  valu*"'!  member  of  the 

voung  man  Mr.  Meents  ^^  iiss  Phila- 

.......  _  .,   ler  of  the  late  Richard  <         ..     i  Iroquois 

and  of  the  twelve  children  of  this  union  livc  sons  and  five 

The  sons  who  are  ast  '  with  their 

's  '-«f  the  firm  of  M.  .  is  &  Sons 

f .     Frank  W.  Meents  is  General 

•  Clifton  and  is  one  of  the  most 

ns  i.'f  this  thriving  viliajre.    He 

1877,  and  a'  ''-'g 

'ic  schools  u  .is 

V,  at  Onarga.  ui  v\  hich 

'.,i  1897.     In  tl)v  same 

•  father's  business  and 

•:.    In  1906  t  le 

I   at  Clifton  .e 

has  the  general  supervision  of  the  Meents  grain  elevator,  whirl,  was 

■■"■^  nnd  which  has  a  capacity  of  ninety  thousand  bun  '.rlj.. 

:d  lather,  Mr.  Meents  is  an  active  member  -'"i  ihe 

v.hicago  ot.<ard- of  Trade,  and  as  a  business  man  and  loyal  •I'v-'n 

he  is  well  upholding  the  prestige  of  the  family  name.     He  •-  a 

stalwart  supporter  of  the  principles  of  the  Republican  party  and  his 

progressiveness  has  been  further  shown  by  his  conducting  a  banking 

business  in  connPcM'nn  with  his  other  interests  at  Clifton,  the  li.irik- 

ing  departmen  .ess  being  in  charge  of  F.  E.  Babi  >  ■  k. 

t},e-*"— ;-.  -.  ■L-i-,...,.„r.     In  1903  Mr.  Meent«  v. .  '  ',  d 

M:  Iter  of  August  Mu(  it, 

■     ■  •      •  ^.^. 

■  ■er 

(''resi- 


the  ali. 
Vice-I: 


of  the 

Board 

e  man 

ssible. 

iias  al- 

world 

public 

The 

.•tary's 

cholar 

added 

..irtant 

_h  ripe 

ess  and  in 

.  Director, 

Trade,  he 


226  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

was  thoroughly  conversant  with  the  rules  of  the  Association,  with 
legal  decisions  affecting  the  transactions  of  the  Board,  and  with  the 
many  complex  problems  confronting  it  as  to  the  proper  control  of 
trade.  Always  a  deep  student,  both  of  events  and  books,  Secretary 
Merrill,  through  his  pleasing  and  convincing  oratory  and  his  clear 
and  logical  writings,  has  been  able  to  do  much  to  dispel  prejudice 
against  the  Board  and  to  place  its  transactions  and  its  important 
functions  as  the  world's  market  place  in  their  true  light.  In  this 
manner  his  services  have  been  eagerly  sought  by  commercial  and 
educational  bodies  and  at  least  one  of  his  lectures  on  "Truth  and 
Error  in  the  Economies  of  the  Grain  Trade,"  stands  as  a  classic 
in  its  line.  At  this  writing  Secretary  Merrill  is  in  Washington  aid- 
ing patriotically  in  the  solution  of  the  great  problem  of  food  distribu- 
tion which  faces  a  nation  engaged  in  war.  Few  can  claim  purer 
American  ancestry  than  can  Mr.  Merrill,  who  is  a  lineal  descendant 
of  Nathaniel  Merrill,  who  settled  in  Newburyport,  Massachusetts, 
in  1627,  and,  on  his  father's  side  is  a  direct  descendant  of  Lord  Guil- 
ford Dudley,  who  emigrated  to  this  country  for  reasons  of  safety  at 
the  time  Lord  Guilford  was  beheaded.  Mr.  Merrill  was  born  in 
Bergen,  Genesee  County,  New  York,  the  son  of  Daniel  and  Elvira 
M.  (Hudson)  Merrill,  and  the  character  and  convictions  of  his 
parents  need  no  further  statement  than  that  they  named  their  son 
John  Charles  Fremont,  in  honor  of  the  great  "Pathfinder,"  the 
apostle  of  human  liberty,  and  the  founder  of  the  Republican  party. 
The  youth  of  the  future  Secretary  of  the  Board  of  Trade  was  passed 
in  the  New  York  farm  home  of  his  parents  and  in  attendance  in  the 
public  schools.  Later  he  worked  as  a  clerk  in  a  village  store  and 
when  but  a  young  man  of  twenty-two  years  he  felt  the  urge  of  the 
great  West,  and  the  year  1873  found  him  engaged  as  a  grain  buyer 
at  Rockford,  Illinois.  After  five  years  of  this  most  practical  expe- 
rience in  the  grain  business,  Mr.  Merrill's  ambitious  nature  led  him 
to  try  the  larger  field  offered  by  the  growing  city  of  Chicago  and  his 
ability  proved  ample  for  the  increased  responsibilities  which  he 
assumed  as  a  member  of  the  Grain  Commission  firm  of  Merrill  & 
Lyon,  in  1878.  His  business  record  was  one  of  conservatism,  scru- 
pulous integrity  and  success,  and  he  gradually  attracted  and  held 
the  esteem  and  friendship  of  the  best  men  of  Chicago's  business 
world.  Thus  it  was  that  in  January,  1911,  he  was  elected  President 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  the  record  of  his  administration,  given  at 
length  in  other  pages  of  this  history,  is  one  of  great  strength  and 
ability.  He  declined  re-election,  and  upon  the  death  of  George  F. 
Stone,  who  had  been  the  distinguished  Secretary  of  the  Board  for 
twenty-eight  years,  it  was  felt  that  no  man  was  better  equipped  by 
experience,  training  and  intellectual  capacity  to  succeed  him  than 
was  J.  C.  F.  Merrill,  and  he  was  accordingly  elected  to  that  position 
by  the  Board  of  Directors  on  August  1,  1912.  His  nearly  five  years 
of  service  as  Secretary  have  been  productive  of  many  improvements 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  227 

in  the  work  of  the  office  to  meet  the  demands  of  the  ever-growing 
business  of  the  Exchange  and  his  department  is  now  in  the  highest 
state  of  efficiency.  He  has  also  made  strong  impress  upon  the  rules 
governing  the  Association  and  the  regulations  making  "cornering" 
manipulations  almost  an  impossibility  were  formulated  by  him.  In 
his  relations  with  the  public  and  with  the  members  of  the  Board  he  is 
one  of  the  most  courteous,  affable  and  accommodating  gentlemen 
and  this  spirit  imbues  the  entire  department  under  his  charge.  From 
his  youthful  association  with  farm  life  Mr.  Merrill  has  always  re- 
tained a  sincere  love  of  nature  and  his  greatest  pleasure  has  been  in 
horticulture  and  in  the  growing  of  fruits  and  flowers  at  his  lovely 
country  home  at  Hinsdale,  Illinois,  a  delightful  Chicago  suburb. 
Mr.  Merrill  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  B.  Lindsay  at  Gallon,  Ohio, 
on  March  25,  1885,  and  the  great  sorrow  came  to  his  life  eight  years 
later,  when  she  was  called  to  the  life  everlasting,  leaving  with  him 
as  dearest  comforters  two  children,  a  daughter,  Charlotte,  who  is 
now  the  charming  mistress  of  his  home,  and  a  son,  Ralph,  who  finds 
employment  in  Chicago.  Mr.  Merrill  has  not  only  been  an  impor- 
tant factor  in  the  commercial  life  of  Chicago,  but  he  has  taken  active 
interest  in  the  affairs  of  his  home  city,  serving  for  four  years  as 
Trustee  of  the  Village  of  Hinsdale  and  for  nine  years  as  President 
of  the  Village  Board.  Politically  Mr.  Merrill  has  been  loyal  to  the 
faith  of  his  father,  and  is  an  ardent  Republican,  while  in  religious 
matters  he  is  equally  steadfast  to  his  New  England  ancestors  as  a 
member  of  the  Congregational  church.  In  the  troublous  times  that 
have  come  to  all  business  interests  and  to  our  country  the  Board  of 
Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  could  have  no  wiser,  saner  counsel 
i^han  that  given  the  administration  of  President  Griffin  by  Secretary 
J.  C.  F.  Merrill. 

John  J.  Mitchell. — The  financial  and  industrial  interests  of  the 
commercial  world  have  long  maintained  as  their  regulators  and  con- 
servators the  well-ordered  banking  institutions,  and  upon  the  stabil- 
ity and  the  proper  systematization  and  management  of  the  latter 
must  depend  the  solidity  and  strength  of  practically  all  other  lines  of 
business  enterprise.  The  part  played  by  the  leading  banking  insti- 
tutions of  the  city  in  connection  with  the  activities  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  has  been  one  of  all-important  honor,  for  without  the  facilities 
of  the  one  the  other  could  scarcely  maintain  its  functions-  It  has 
been  signally  fortunate  that  there  have  been  represented  on  the 
roster  of  the  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  many  of  the  most 
honored  and  influential  figures  in  the  banking  circles  of  the  city,  and 
such  an  one  is  John  J.  Mitchell,  who  has  held  membership  in  the 
Board  since  1883  and  who  is  a  dominating  force  in  connection  with 
the  nation's  financial  operations.  He  has  risen  to  his  present  com- 
manding position  entirely  through  his  own  ability  and  well-ordered 
efforts  and  has  served  since  1880  as  President  of  the  Illinois  Trust  & 
Savings  Bank,  one  of  the  great  institutions  that  lend  financial  and 


228  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

civic  prestige  to  the  splendid  metropolis  of  the  West.  Special  in- 
terest attaches  to  the  career  of  Mr.  Mitchell  by  reason  of  the  fact  that 
he  is  a  native  of  Illinois  and  has  found  in  this  commonwealth  ample 
field  for  his  exceptional  and  significant  achievement  as  a  man  of 
affairs  and  as  a  loyal,  liberal  and  public-spirited  citizen.  As  a  valued 
and  honored  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  he  is  consistently  given 
representation  in  this  publication.  John  J.  Mitchell  was  born  at 
Alton,  Madison  County,  Illinois,  on  the  3d  of  November,  1853,  and 
is  a  son  of  William  H.  and  Mary  A.  Mitchell,  his  father  having  been 
an  influential  and  honored  pioneer  citizen  of  that  city.  Mr.  Mitchell 
is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  his  native  State  for  his  early 
educational  discipline,  which  was  supplemented  by  higher  academic 
studies  in  a  representative  collegiate  institution  at  Kent's  Hill, 
Maine.  The  business  activities  of  Mr.  Mitchell  have  been  centered 
in  Chicago  from  the  time  of  his  youth,  and  he  is  one  of  those  who 
witnessed  and  assisted  in  the  splendid  forward  movement  made  by 
the  city  after  it  had  been  prostrated  by  the  great  fire  of  1871.  It  was 
in  the  year  1873  that  he  assumed  the  position  of  messenger  boy  in 
the  service  of  the  Illinois  Trust  &  Savings  Bank,  and  he  has  been 
closely  associated  with  this  institution  during  the  long  intervening 
years — years  that  have  recorded  his  rise  from  the  most  subordinate 
position  to  that  of  executive  head  of  one  of  the  great  financial  insti- 
tutions of  the  western  metropolis.  Mr.  Mitchell  has  been  a  steadfast, 
faithful  worker  during  all  of  his  mature  life,  and  his  personal  stew- 
ardship has  been  on  a  parity  with  his  appreciation  of  the  value  of 
honest  toil  and  endeavor  and  of  concentration  of  effort.  Chicago  his- 
tory records  many  such  instances  where  young  men  of  sterling 
character  and  worthy  ambition  have  made  their  way  to  commanding 
position,  and  this  record  is  one  that  has  given  special  distinction  of 
true  Americanism  to  the  city.  In  this  connection  it  is  needless  to 
attempt  analysis  of  the  career  of  Mr.  Mitchell  or  to  note  the  manifold 
details  of  the  same,  but  it  may  be  said  with  all  emphasis  that  his 
works  denote  the  man,  the  citizen,  the  sterling  captain  of  industry 
who  is  to  be  consistently  designated  as  one  of  the  representative  men 
of  Chicago  and  one  of  the  influential  financiers  of  the  nation.  Mr. 
Mitchell  has  been  President  of  the  Illinois  Trust  &  Savings  Bank 
since  1880,  and  an  idea  of  his  prominence  in  the  financial  world  is 
further  given  when  it  is  stated  that  he  is  Vice-President  of  the  Audit 
Company  of  New  York,  besides  being  a  member  of  its  Advisory 
Committee  and  its  Western  Board  of  Control ;  that  he  is  a  Trustee 
and  member  of  the  Advisory  Committee  of  the  American  Surety 
Company  of  New  York ;  that  he  is  a  Director  of  Chase  National 
Bank  of  New  York,  the  First  National  Bank  of  that  city,  the  New 
York  Trust  Company,  and  the  Illinois  Trust  &  Safe  Deposit  Com- 
pany. His  capitalistic  support  has  been  given  to  many- enterprises 
that  have  contributed  greatly  to  the  civic  and  material  precedence 
of  Chicago,  and  his  name  appears  on  the  list  of  Directors  of  the  fol- 


"'''fe^^  Xy  ^^^^^^^h-rz^t^^^^jz^^C^^ 


I 


■•  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO 


229 


!.j'ions:     The  Kansas  City  Southern  Rail- 
fit  Alton  Railroad  C  ompany ;  the  Pitts- 
1,0  Railwa}'  C  the  Pullman 

;ihone  &  Tei  -  Company;  the 

the   Commonweaith   Edison   Com- 
......,„..:...  ;..L.       .  inpany ;  the  lntcrn;i^'  ":''  Harvester 

md  other  influential  corporations.     \^  extensive 

'IS  place  cx.^  ■   inands 

"H  is  fully  u_  !ve  of 

'  ntified  with  rvpresenta- 

'   '  •  '^-r-  '        ■■'•0,  the 

d  the 

:;t.ry  ami  ;    :•  Lake 

•>;  a  memher  of  the 

lb.  the  Banker^'  Club, 

.  .ir/aiiLns,     i  iic  family  resideti' c  is  at 

On  the  11th  of  February,  1890.  was 

r.   Mitchell   to   Miss   Mary  Louise 


Dean  L.  Moberley. — In  the  city  of  Streator,  LaSall  v. 

Illinois,  Mr.  Moberley  has  built  up  a  well-ordered  and  j  :3 

business  as  ^rain  broker.     He  is  e<?enttallv  one  of  the  r  i- 

tive  and  po|  iriving  Illinois  ciry  iiis 

member-''  "^     -  -hicago  dafng 

from  ?  -  having  hf«n 

He  has  Vxen 
and  h'=      !0'- 

V 


busi- 

'  er- 

!1- 
-,S 

leator 

name 

■  rs   in 

'   as  a 

.. ..u\\ li  j.:.- .  .  .^.imson 

itro. 


(.,1-. 
fou; 
and  li 


rthy  char 
/li-iructive  wu, 


»    *l  ♦^l 


230  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

ers.  By  virtue  of  his  personality  he  was  vouchsafed  the  prerogatives 
of  honor  and  usefulness  both  as  a  loyal  citizen  and  as  a  man  of 
affairs,  and  in  his  active  association  with  the  grain  trade  in  his 
native  State  he  came  to  the  goal  of  large  success  and  influence.  At 
the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  March  12,  1914,  he  was  Presi- 
dent of  the  Montelius  Grain  Company,  of  Piper  City,  and  it  was 
largely  through  his  energy  and  ability  that  this  company  gained  its 
present  standing  as  one  of  the  most  important  of  the  concerns  en- 
gaged extensively  in  the  grain  business  in  eastern  Illinois.  The 
objective  appreciation  of  his  character  and  of  his  authoritative  judg- 
ment in  all  that  concerns  the  grain  business  in  its  direct  industrial 
and  commercial  ramifications,  was  significantly  shown  by  his  being 
called  to  the  Presidency  of  the  Illinois  Grain  Dealers'  Association, 
an  office  of  which  he  was  the  incumbent  in  1909  and  1910.  In  this 
executive  position  he  fully  maintained  his  poise  as  a  business  man 
of  much  circumspection  and  progressiveness,  and  there  was  naught 
of  the  perfunctory  element  in  his  administration.  Within  his  re- 
gime he  did  much  to  vitalize  the  work  of  the  association,  especially 
in  obtaining  needed  legislation  for  protecting  and  conserving  the 
interests  of  both  the  producers  of  and  dealers  in  grain.  Upon  his 
retirement  from  the  Presidency  he  was  made  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Directors  of  the  Association,  and  in  this  position  he  continued  to 
wield  impressive  influence  until  the  time  of  his  death.  It  was  but 
natural  that  a  man  thus  prominently  identified  with  the  grain  busi- 
ness in  Illinois  should  become  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of 
the  City  of  Chicago  and  that  he  should  gain  prestige  as  one  of  the 
representative  and  valued  non-resident  members  of  this  great  com- 
mercial body.  He  availed  himself  fully  of  the  privileges  of  the 
Board  and  the  company  of  which  he  was  President  is  still  repre- 
sented in  the  personnel  of  this  organization — by  his  brother,  Joseph 
K.,  who  succeeded  him  as  President  of  the  Montelius  Grain  Com- 
pany and  who  is  individually  mentioned  on  other  pages  of  this  pub- 
lication. A  representative  of  one  of  the  well-known  and  influential 
families  of  Ford  County,  Illinois,  Mr.  Montelius  was  born  at  Piper 
City,  this  county,  on  the  30th  of  November,  1872,  and  thus  he  was 
in  the  very  flower  of  strong  and  useful  manhood  when  he  passed 
from  the  stage  of  life's  mortal  endeavors,  his  death  having  occurred 
in  the  city  of  Mobile,  Alabama.  His  parents,  John  A.  and  Kate 
(Gast)  Montelius,  still  reside  at  Piper  City,  and  concerning  them 
more  specific  mention  is  made  on  other  pages,  in  the  sketch  of  Joseph 
K.  Montelius.  Mr.  Montelius  acquired  his  rudimentary  education 
under  the  direction  of  a  private  governess  retained  in  the  family 
home,  and  thereafter  he  made  good  use  of  the  advantages  of  the 
public  schools  in  his  native  village.  In  1889  he  attended  the  academy 
at  Lake  Forest,  Illinois,  and  during  the  ensuing  two  years  he  was 
a  student  in  the  Michigan  Military  Academy,  at  Orchard  Lake, 
an   excellent   institution    whose   existence   was   unfortunately    per- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  2J1 

mitted  to  lapse  a  few  years  ago.     After  leaving  school  Mr.  Mon- 
telius  became  actively  connected  with  his  father's  large  and  varied 
business   interests  at   Piper   City,   where  eventually   he   became   a 
member  of  the  firm  of  Montelius  Brothers,  dealers  in  agricultural 
implements  and  machinery,  as  well  as  in  vehicles.    Later  he  became 
associated  with  his  father  in  the  grain  and  milling  business,  under 
the  firm  name  of  George  D.  Montelius  &  Co.,  and  upon  the  retire- 
ment of  his  father,  in  1913,  the  Montelius  Grain  Company  was  organ- 
ized to  take  control  of  the  extensive  business.     He  became  Presi- 
dent of  the  company,  and  of  this  office  he  continued  the  incumbent 
until  his  death.    Concerning  him  the  following  consistent  statement 
has  been  written  :    "He  seemed  particularly  adapted  to  this  business, 
his  keen  foresight  and  sound  judgment  standing  him  in  good  stead, 
and  he  became  a  prominent  figure  among  the  grain  dealers  of  the 
State."    By  birth,  breeding  and  intrinsic  personality  Mr.  Montelius 
stood  exponent  of  ideal  citizenship,  and  in  his  civic  attitude  he  was 
significantly  loyal  and  public-spirited.     No  enterprise  or  movement 
projected  for  the  general  good  of  his  home  community  and  native 
county  failed  to  enlist  his  lively  interest  and  effective  support.     He 
served  as  a  member  of  the  Municipal  Board  of  Trustees  of  Piper 
City  and  was  called  upon  to  hold  other  positions  of  public  trust  in 
the  community.     He  became  a  member  of  the  Directorate  of  the 
Ford  County  Fair  Association  at  the  time  of  its  organization,  and 
he  held  this  position  until  his  death.     In  1911-12  he  was  President 
of  this  association,  and  his  administration  proved  most  successful, 
as  he  brought  to  bear  the  earnest  zeal  and  fidelity  of  purpose  that 
significantly  denoted  him  in  all  of  the  relations  of  life.    He  was  in- 
fluential in  the  local  councils  of  the  Republican  party  and  also  gave 
effective  general  service  in  promotion  of  the  party  cause.    He  served 
several  years  as  a  member  of  the  Republican  Central  Committee  of 
Ford  County,  Illinois,  and  was  for  two  years  Chairman  of  the  County 
Committee,  a  position  in   which  he   showed   much   finesse   in   the 
maneuvering  of  the  political  forces  at  his  command.    The  inviolable 
stewardship  of  Mr.  Alontelius  had  full  reinforcement  in  the  abiding 
Christian  faith  which  dominated  his  course  in  both  thought  and 
action.     He  became  a  member  of  the  First  Presbyterian  church  of 
Piper  City  February  6,  1886,  and  he  was  an  elder  of  the  same  from 
September  19.  1897,  until  the  time  of  his  death.    In  the  time-honored 
Masonic  fraternity  he  received  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  An- 
cient Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  in  Oriental  Consistory,  of  Chicago,  in 
which  city  he  was  affiliated  also  with  Medinah  Temple  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine.     In  the  York  Rite  Masonry  his  affiliations  were  with  Piper 
Lodge,  No.  608.  Ancient  Free  &  Accepted  Masons,  serving  as  Mas- 
ter, and  Piper  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons,  and  first  Worthy  Patron 
O.  E.  S ;  was  Eminent  Commander  of  St.  Paul's  Commandery,  No. 
34.  Knights  Templars,  at  Fairbury.     He   also   served   as  Worthy 
Patron  in  the  local  chapter  of  the  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star,  and 


232  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

was  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  The 
noble  character  of  Mr.  Montelius  found  its  supreme  exemplification 
in  the  associations  of  a  singularly  ideal  home  life,  and  in  gracious 
memories  of  him  those  who  were  nearest  and  dearest  find  their 
chief  consolation.  On  the  2Sth  of  December,  1894,  he  wedded  Miss 
Clara  Plank,  whose  death  occurred  in  October  of  the  following  year. 
On  the  26th  of  June,  1900,  was  solemnized  his  marriage  to  Miss  Anna 
Stadler,  who  survives  him,  as  do  also  their  two  children,  Charles 
and  Dorothy,  Mrs.  Montelius  and  her  children  still  residing  in  the 
beautiful  home  at  Piper  City,  where  she  is  an  active  member  of  the 
First  Presbyterian  church  and  a  leader  in  the  social  activities  of  the 
community. 

Joseph  K.  Montelius. — Residing  outside  of  the  borders  of  the 
western  metropolis  is  an  appreciable  and  valued  contingent  of  active 
members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  one  of 
the  prominent  Illinois  representatives  of  this  quota  is  Joseph  K. 
Montelius.  President  of  the  Montelius  Grain  Company,  of  Piper 
City,  Ford  County.  He  is  the  executive  head  of  one  of  the  impor- 
tant concerns  in  the  grain  trade  of  eastern  Illinois,  and  as  President 
of  the  company,  as  well  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  he  is 
the  successor  of  his  brother,  the  late  George  D.  Montelius,  to  whom 
a  memoir  is  dedicated  on  other  pages  of  this  work.  He  is  a  member 
of  one  of  the  honored  and  influential  families  of  Ford  County,  Illi- 
nois, and  his  prominent  status  as  an  exponent  of  the  grain  trade 
makes  most  consonant  the  recognition  accorded  to  him  in  this  his- 
tory. Mr.  Montelius  was  born  at  Piper  City  on  the  17th  of  February, 
1870,  and  is  a  son  of  John  A.  and  Kate  (Gast)  Montelius,  the  other 
three  surviving  children  of  the  family  being  John  A.,  Jr.,  Margaret 
and  Mary,  all  residents  of  Piper  City.  John  A.  Montelius,  St.,  is  one 
of  the  oldest  and  most  successful  representatives  of  the  grain  busi- 
ness in  the  State  of  Illinois,  and  his  capitalistic  interests  are  now 
broad  and  varied.  In  the  year  1866  he  engaged  in  the  buying  and 
shipping  of  grain  at  Piper  City,  where  he  simultaneously  established 
a  general  merchandise  business.  His  influence  in  the  passing  years 
permeated  the  community  life  in  a  most  benignant  way,  and  there 
have  been  few  citizens  of  Ford  County  who  have  made  a  record  of 
larger  or  more  worthy  achievement.  In  1870  Mr.  Montelius  engaged 
in  banking,  conducting  the  Piper  City  Bank,  this  organization 
eventually  becoming  the  First  National  Bank  of  Piper  City,  in  1900, 
he  and  his  son,  Joseph  K.,  being  heavy  stockholders  in  the  latter 
institution,  which  he  served  as  its  first  President  and  which  has  a 
capital  and  surplus  of  $75,000,  with  deposits  in  excess  of  $200,000. 
He  has  been  for  many  years  a  stalwart  in  the  Illinois  ranks  of  the 
Republican  party,  and  he  has  been  one  of  its  influential  figures  in  his 
county  and  district.  He  represented  Ford  County  in  the  State  legis- 
lature for  four  terms  and  in  1904  was  one  of  the  Republican  electors 
from  Illinois.    He  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  First  Presby- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  233 

terian  Church  of  Piper  City,  he  is  a  charter  member  of  the  local  lodge 
of  Ancient  Free  &  Accepted  Masons  and  is  affiliated  also  with  the 
Commandery  of  Knights  Templars  at  Fairbury,  Livingston  County. 
Joseph  K.  Montelius  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  Piper  City 
for  his  early  educational  discipline,  which  was  effectively  supple- 
mented by  a  course  of  two  years  in  the  Lake  Forest  Academy,  at 
Lake  Forest,  Illinois.  Immediately  after  leaving  school  he  assumed 
the  position  of  general  bookkeeper  in  connection  with  the  important 
business  activities  of  his  father,  besides  serving  as  cashier  of  the 
Piper  City  Bank,  in  the  stock  of  which  his  father  held  the  controlling 
interest.  After  holding  this  latter  position  two  years  he  became 
cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank,  of  which  executive  office  he 
continued  the  efficient  and  popular  incumbent  until  1912,  when  he 
resigned  the  post,  in  order  that  he  might  give  his  undivided  attention 
to  the  grain  business,  in  which  he  had  become  associated  with  his 
father  and  his  brother,  George  D.  Upon  the  death  of  his  brother, 
March  12,  1914,  he  succeeded  the  latter  as  President  of  the  Montelius 
Grain  Company,  and  also  as  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade.  The  Montelius  Grain  Company  controls  a  very  large  and 
well  ordered  business  in  the  buying  and  shipping  of  grain,  its  well- 
equipped  elevators  at  Piper  City  having  a  capacity  of  200,000 
bushels,  and  an  adequate  force  of  employes  being  retained.  In  the 
conduct  of  the  enterprise  the  father,  John  A.  Montelius,  Sr.,  is  still 
associated,  though  with  advancing  years  he  has  to  a  large  degree 
curtailed  his  executive  activities.  Joseph  K.  Montelius  is  eiifectively 
upholding  the  family  reputation  for  broad-minded  and  liberal  citi- 
zenship, is  unwavering  in  his  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  and 
he  and  his  wife  are  active  members  of  the  First  Presbyterian  church 
in  their  home  village.  He  is  affiliated  with  Piper  Lodge,  No.  608, 
Ancient  Free  &  Accepted  Masons,  and  with  the  same  commandery 
of  Knights  Templars  as  is  his  honored  father.  He  gives  his  influence 
and  co-operation  in  all  normal  enterprises  projected  for  the  general 
good  of  the  community  and  is  a  member  of  the  Directorate  of  the 
First  National  Bank,  of  which  he  was  formerly  cashier.  November 
30,  1898,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Montelius  to  Miss 
Helen  B.  Stadler,  a  daughter  of  John  Stadler,  of  Ford  County,  and 
they  have  seven  children,  namely:  Harry  A.,  Catherine  L.,  Alfred 
F.,  Ruth  E.,  Helen  L.,  Miriam  G.  and  John  A.,  HI. 

Harry  C.  Moore. — LaSalle  County,  Illinois,  has  given  an  appre- 
ciable and  valued  quota  to  the  membership  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  a  popular  representative  of  this  contin- 
gent is  Mr.  Moore,  whose  membership  dates  from  the  spring  of  1914 
and  whose  business  headquarters  as  a  successful  and  well  fortified 
commission  merchant  are  maintained  at  Mendota,  that  county.  Like 
many  others  who  have  gained  individual  success  in  the  grain  com- 
mission trade,  he  had  previously  gained  valuable  experience  through 
connection  with  various  firms  in  the  capacity  of  telegraph  operator 


234  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

and  office  manager,  so  that  in  establishing  his  present  business  he 
did  not  begin  operations  as  a  novice.  Mr.  Moore  was  born  at  Webb 
City,  Iowa,  April  20,  1878,  and  is  a  son  of  William  and  Olina  (Rem- 
ington) Moore,  his  father  having  been  a  skilled  mechanic  and  having 
been  employed  as  such  at  various  places.  Harry  C.  Moore  acquired 
his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Webb  City  and  at 
the  age  of  twenty  years  he  there  entered  the  service  of  the  Western 
Union  Telegraph  Company.  He  was  first  a  messenger  and  later 
a  telegraph  operator  for  this  company,  and  after  a  period  of  four 
years  he  took  the  position  of  telegraph  operator  for  the  well  known 
Chicago  commission  firm  of  Ware  &  Leland.  He  won  merited 
promotion,  was  ambitious  in  gaining  thorough  knowledge  of  the 
various  details  of  the  business,  and  in  1905  he  became  manager  and 
operator  for  the  Cassidy  Company  in  the  same  line  of  business.  In 
1906  he  severed  this  alliance  and  became  manager  of  the  Mendota 
office  opened  by  the  firm  of  Ware  &  Leland.  He  retained  this  posi- 
tion until  September,  1910,  when  he  associated  himself  with  Hitch 
&  Co.,  another  of  the  well  known  firms  represented  on  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade,  and  this  incumbency  continued  until  he  established 
his  present  independent  business  at  Mendota,  on  the  1st  of  April, 
1914.  In  politics  Mr.  Moore  gives  staunch  allegiance  to  the  Repub- 
lican party  and  he  is  known  as  one  of  the  progressive  and  public- 
spirited  citizens  and  representative  business  men  of  the  fine  little 
city  of  Mendota.  In  a  fraternal  way  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Benevo- 
lent &  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Mr.  Moore  was  married  to  Miss 
Emma  Haag,  a  daughter  of  Leonard  Haag. 

Watson  S.  Moore. — In  the  great  grain  trade  of  the  Northwest 
the  W.  S.  Moore  Grain  Company,  of  Duluth,  Minnesota,  holds  pre- 
cedence as  being  one  of  the  largest  and  most  important  grain  export- 
ing concerns  representing  that  phase  of  the  all-important  commercial 
and  industrial  enterprise,  even  as  it  is  one  of  the  oldest  in  the  grain 
commission  trade  centered  in  the  vigorous  gate  city  at  the  head  of 
Lake  Superior.  Of  this  company  Watson  S.  Moore  was  the  organ- 
izer, and  he  has  been  its  President  from  the  time  of  its  incorporation. 
A  man  of  broad  and  varied  experience  in  the  grain  commerce  of  the 
Northwest,  he  is  one  of  its  most  influential  exponents  in  that  sec- 
tion of  the  Union,  besides  which  he  is  known  as  a  steadfast  and 
public-spirited  citizen  who  is  ever  ready  to  lend  his  co-operation  in 
support  of  measures  advanced  for  the  good  of  his  home  city.  Of 
the  company  of  which  he  is  President  and  which  bears  his  name 
E.  A.  Forsyth  is  Secretary  and  Treasurer.  Watson  S.  Moore  was 
born  in  Pennsylvania,  on  the  13th  of  November,  1867,  and  is  a  son 
of  Rev.  James  G.  and  Caroline  (Sadler)  Moore,  his  father  having 
been  a  man  of  high  intellectual  attainments  and  having  been  for 
many  years  a  distinguished  member  of  the  clergy  of  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church.  He  had  various  important  charges,  and  continued 
his  earnest  and  devoted  labors  in  the  ministry  until  his  death,  which 


^^1^  I'' 


•n  five  in  number. 
■  in  the  public  schov 
..siness  when  he  was 
imed  a  minor  clerical  p 

■  (.■!  tiK-  ii^ikimore  C' 
jjerience.    In  this  con 
hat  at  the  present  time  hii. 
•  s  of  the  p.  •'■•'•'   vf  Cham!"  '^ 
>Iium  h'-  cps   m 


1   y'j,i\ 
Moor^ 


the  office  oi 

lie  gained 

resting  to 

tnr'  IS  enrolled  on  the  list  of 

'    •'   "i»rce,  ami  that  through 

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■     -    -  ':inec- 

a  of 

enc  operaiiuns  as 

:.li  have  covered  a 

success  in  the  handling  of  a  large  vol- 

cvtaiiifiily  ir.ade  it  expedient  for  him  to  amplify  and 

its  function  by  effecting  the  organization  of  the 

W.  S.  Moore  Grain  Company,  which  was  incorporated  in  1911  and 

of  which  he  has  been  President  from  the  beginning,  this  company 

succeeding  to  the  control  of  the  substantial  business  that  had  previ- 

cn  developed  under  his  aggressive  and  caicful  super*  ■ 

>re  i-:  >i'.ie    'f  the  memlicrs  of  the  Duluth  Board  of    ' 

or  of  Commerce,  as  well  as  the  Bait! 

-''  •'      f '     ''  '"^^e  of  the  City 

of  the  gre^t 
in  the  V 
one  spt 
ir.  Moot 


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leller 


K;.i;road.    1  be  company  figures  pre 


n  ihe  cash  g 


« 


'1*  <^     ' 


236  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

and  its  substantial  business  is  handled  with  distinct  progressiveness 
and  circumspection,  so  that  its  operations  are  placed  on  a  substantial 
and  enduring  basis.  Mr.  Mueller's  membership  on  the  Board  of 
Trade  dates  from  March,  1912,  and  he  has  proved  himself  fully- 
appreciative  of  its  facilities  and  of  the  precedence  which  it  grants. 
Mr.  Mueller  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the  29th  of  August,  1888,  and 
he  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  for  his  early 
education,  which  included  the  curriculum  of  the  high  school.  He 
amplified  his  scholastic  training  by  continuing  two  years  as  a 
student  in  Cornell  University,  at  Ithaca,  New  York,  and  after  his 
return  to  Chicago  he  held  for  six  months  a  position  as  messenger 
and  clerk  in  the  Hamilton  National  Bank.  He  then  entered  the 
grain  business,  with  which  he  has  since  been  actively  and  success- 
fully identified,  the  Mueller  &  Young  Grain  Company,  of  which  he 
is  President,  having  been  organized  and  incorporated  in  1901.  Mr. 
Mueller  is  popular  in  business  and  social  circles  in  his  native  city 
and  his  name  is  still  enrolled  on  the  list  of  eligible  young  bachelors 
in  Chicago.  He  is  a  member  of  the  University  Club,  the  Traffic 
Club,  the  Germania  Club,  the  Chicago  Automobile  Club,  and  the 
South  Shore  Country  Club. 

William  R.  Mumford. — It  is  specially  gratifying  to  be  able  to 
accord  in  this  publication  specific  recognition  to  those  sterling  busi- 
ness men  who  are  consistently  to  be  designated  as  pioneer  members 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  who  have  by  char- 
acter and  achievement  lent  dignity  and  distinction  to  that  great 
organization  of  ponderous  commercial  influence.  Such  a  member 
is  William  Rice  Mumford,  whose  identification  with  the  Board  has 
covered  a  period  of  more  than  forty  years  and  whose  place  in  the 
confidence  and  esteem  of  its  members  is  high  and  inviolable.  Mr. 
Mumford  has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago  since  1863,  was  one  of  the 
sturdy,  courageous  and  determined  business  men  who  aided  in  the 
civic,  commercial  and  material  rebuilding  of  the  city  after  the  great 
fire  which  prostrated  the  urban  community  in  1871,  and  he  has  long 
held  impregnable  vantage-ground  as  one  of  the  leading  representa- 
tives in  the  grain,  mill-feed  and  hay  trade  in  the  city  that  has  been 
his  home  and  the  stage  of  his  worthy  and  successful  activities  for 
more  than  half  a  century.  He  is  still  active  in  business,  as  head  of 
the  well  known  and  influential  firm  of  W.  R.  Mumford  &  Co.,  with 
offices  at  140  West  Van  Buren  Street,  and  no  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  is  more  entitled  to  recognition  in  this  publication  than  this 
veteran  man  of  affairs,  who  has  held  steadfast  to  the  course  of  integ- 
rity and  honor  in  all  the  relations  of  life  and  who  has  achieved  suc- 
cess that  is  worthy  of  the  name.  William  Rice  Mumford  is  a  scion 
of  one  of  the  sterling  colonial  families  of  America  and  was  born  at 
Wilkesbarre,  Luzerne  County,  Pennsylvania,  on  the  5th  of  March, 
1842,  a  son  of  Lyman  and  Margaret  (Rice)  Mumford.  His  early 
education  was  acquired  in  the  common  schools  and  proved  adequate 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  237 

foundation  for  that  broader  discipline  which  he  was  later  to  gain 
under  the  preceptorship  of  that  wisest  of  all  head-masters,  Experi- 
ence. He  early  associated  himself  with  practical  business  affairs 
and  later  initiated  an  independent  career.  He  finally  engaged  in 
the  retail  dry  goods  business  at  Utica,  New  York,  where  he  con- 
tinued his  activities  along  this  line  until  1863,  when,  shortly  after 
attaining  to  his  legal  majority,  he  came  to  Chicago  and  numbered 
himself  among  its  ambitious  and  progressive  young  business  men. 
Here  he  engaged  in  the  handling  of  grain,  mill  feed  and  hay,  and 
with  this  basic  line  of  business  enterprise  he  has  continued  to  be 
actively  identified  during  the  long  intervening  period  of  more  than 
half  a  century, — years  marked  by  earnest,  persistent  and  effective 
endeavor  on  his  part.  His  trade  has  been  almost  exclusively  on  a 
cash  basis,  he  has  dabbled  but  little  in  "futures"  or  speculative  enter- 
prise, and  thus  his  business  has  rested  at  all  times  on  a  stable  and 
normal  foundation.  The  firm  of  which  he  is  now  the  executive  head, 
that  of  W.  R.  Mumford  &  Co.,  dates  its  inception  from  the  year  1865, 
and  though  he  has  now  passed  the  psalmist's  span  of  three  score 
years  and  ten  he  retains  pronounced  physical  and  mental  vigor 
and  is  still  found  actively  supervising  his  substantial  business  affairs, 
—a  veteran  whose  example  is  an  incentive  and  inspiration  to  the 
younger  generation.  Mr.  Mumford  became  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  in  July,  1875,  and  has  since  continued  one  of  its  active, 
loyal  and  popular  representatives,  though  he  has  not  desired  or  held 
official  position  on  the  Board.  He  served  one  year  as  President 
of  the  Chicago  Hay  Receivers'  Association,  and  for  five  years  gave 
characteristically  effective  service  as  Secretary  of  the  Chicago  Feed 
Dealers'  Association,  of  both  of  which  organizations  he  has  been  a 
valued  and  influential  member.  As  a  citizen  Mr.  Mumford  has  shown 
a  lively  interest  in  all  things  touching  the  welfare  and  advance- 
ment of  his  home  city  and  his  influence  and  co-operation  have  been 
given  in  support  of  measures  and  enterprises  projected  for  the  gen- 
eral good  of  the  community.  He  was  formerly  in  active  affiliation 
with  the  Royal  Arcanum  and  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fel- 
lows, in  the  latter  of  which  he  held  various  official  positions.  Both 
he  and  his  wife  have  long  been  active  and  zealous  members  of  the 
Methodist  Episcopal  church,  and  they  have  an  attractive  home  in  the 
beautiful  suburban  city  of  Evanston.  In  the  year  1871  was  solemn- 
ized the  marriage  of  Mr.  Mumford  to  Miss  Charlotte  Elizabeth 
Hamilton,  and  they  have  three  children :  May  Adele,  is  the  wife  of 
Clay  Arthur  Roney ;  Clarence  Rice,  is  engaged  in  business  with  his 
father,  and  Grace  R.,  is  the  wife  of  Arthur  Jay  Smith. 

William  E.  Nailer. — One  of  the  prominent  and  influential  rep- 
resentatives of  the  grain-commission  and  stock-brokerage  business 
in  the  city  of  Minneapolis  is  Mr.  Neiler,  who  is  the  executive  head 
of  the  W.  E.  Neiler  Company,  with  offices  at  109  South  Fourth 
Street.    The  company  is  represented  in  membership  in  the  Minne- 


238  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

apolis  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  city 
of  Chicago.  In  connection  with  his  business  he  maintains  private 
wire  facilities  touching  the  cities  of  Chicago,  New  York  and  Bos- 
ton, with  membership  in  the  New  York  Stock  Exchange,  and  with 
the  well  known  Chicago  commission  firms  of  Logan  &  Bryan,  and 
Ware  &  Leland  as  correspondents.  Mr.  Neiler  holds  membership 
in  the  Minneapolis  Clearing  House  Association,  and  is  one  of  the 
progressive  business  men  and  citizens  of  his  native  city.  He  has 
developed  a  substantial  and  important  commission  and  brokerage 
business,  the  same  having  been  begun  in  1908,  and  in  his  office  he 
retains  a  corps  of  eight  efficient  assistants.  Special  attention  is 
given  to  the  listing  of  local  securities  and  to  curb  copper  stocks. 
The  extensive  grain  business  centered  in  Minneapolis  finds  in  Mr. 
Neiler  a  vigorous  and  successful  exponent,  and  it  is  pleasing  to 
accord  him  recognition  in  this  history  of  the  Chicago  Board  of 
Trade,  an  organization  of  whose  privileges  and  functions  he  is 
deeply  appreciative.  William  E.  Neiler  is  a  scion  of  one  of  the  old, 
honored  and  influential  families  of  Minneapolis,  in  which  city  he  was 
born  October  26,  1863.  He  is  a  son  of  Samuel  E.  and  Lavina  (Jack- 
son) Neiler,  and  his  father  was  not  only  one  of  the  pioneers  of  Minne- 
apolis, but  also  became  a  prominent  figure  in  the  city's  banking  and 
general  business  activities.  He  was  one  of  the  prominent  bankers 
of  Minneapolis  at  the  time  of  his  death  in  1913.  He,  whose  name 
begins  this  review,  gained  in  his  youth  the  advantages  of  the  paro- 
chial and  public  schools  of  his  native  city,  and  in  the  earlier  stages  of 
his  business  career  he  was  associated  with  the  banking  interests  of 
his  father.  He  has  been  identified  with  the  grain  commission  busi- 
ness since  1905  and,  as  previously  noted,  he  established  his  present 
business  in  1908.  In  politics  he  gives  his  allegiance  to  the  Republi- 
can party,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Catholic 
church.  Mr.  Neiler  was  married  to  Miss  Judith  T.  Priselle,  a  daugh- 
ter of  Nathan  Priselle,  of  Minneapolis. 

Daniel  E.  Newhall. — By  reason  of  its  very  geographical  posi- 
tion, as  an  important  entrepot  on  the  Great  Lakes,  the  city  of  Buf- 
falo, New  York,  has  important  commercial  functions  in  connection 
with  the  grain  trade  of  both  the  East  and  the  West,  and  among  the 
representative  and  veteran  figures  in  the  grain  brokerage  business 
in  that  city  a  place  of  priority  and  much  influence  must  be  accorded 
to  Mr.  Newhall,  who  has  been  engaged  in  this  line  of  commercial 
enterprise  for  fully  half  a  century,  and  who  is  the  oldest  representa- 
tive in  Buiifalo  to  claim  continuous  membership  on  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade,  with  which  he  has  been  identified  since  1881  and 
among  whose  members  he  is  well  known  and  held  in  unqualified  con- 
fidence and  esteem.  He  is  a  member  also  of  the  Buflfalo  Corn  Ex- 
change, the  Buflfalo  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Buflfalo  Produce 
Exchange,  and  the  Milwaukee  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  last  named 
being  an  important  commercial  organization  in  his  native  city.    Mr. 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  239 

Newhall  was  born  in  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  on  the  4th  of  Septem- 
ber, 1846,  and  is  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  honored  and  influential 
pioneer  families  of  the  Wisconsin  metropolis.    He  is  a  son  of  Daniel 
and  Mary  M.  (Teeney)  Newhall,  and  his  father  was  for  many  years 
one  of  the  well  known  and  prominent  figures  in  the  grain  trade  in 
Milwaukee  and  its  surrounding  districts.    He  was  one  of  the  vener- 
able and  revered  business  men  of  that  city  at  the  time  of  his  death  in 
1903.    After  receiving  the  advantages  of  the  common  schools  of  his 
native  city,  Daniel  E.  Newhall  was  enabled  to  pursue  a  higher  course 
of  study  in  Racine  College,  at  Racine,  Wisconsin.    As  an  ambitious 
youth  he  manifested  his  earnest  desire  to  follow  the  line  of  busi- 
ness enterprise  which  has  been   dignified  by  the   interposition   of 
his  father,  and  thus  he  gained  his  initial  experience  in  the  grain 
trade  in  his  home  city  of  Milwaukee,  this  phase  of  business  having 
much    engrossed    his    attention    as    a    productive    vocation    since 
the  year   1866.     In   1867,  he  established  himself  in  business  as  a 
grain  broker  in  the  city  of  BufTslo,  and  he  has  long  been  successful 
and  a  recognized  authority  in  this  field  of  enterprise  in  western 
New  York.    Mr.  Newhall  has  shown  the  most  vital  loyalty  and  liber- 
ality as  a  man  of  affairs  and  as  a  broad-minded  citizen,  his  political 
allegiance  having  been  given  uniformly  to  the  Republican  party, 
and  he  and  his  family  hold  memberships  in  the  Presbyterian  church. 
Mr.  Newhall  married  Miss  Anna  S.  Hayden,  a  daughter  of  William 
Hayden,  and  of  the  six  children  of  this  union  all  are  living  except  one. 
George   R.   Nichols. — Distinctive   resourcefulness   has   marked 
the  career  of  Captain  Nichols  in  connection  with  extensive  and  im- 
portant operations  as  an  exponent  of  the  commission  grain  business 
and  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  representative  com- 
mercial organization  he  has  been  a  valued  member  since  December 
7,  1878,  and  of  which  he  has  served  as  a  director.     His  association 
with  the  grain  brokerage  trade  in  Chicago  had  its  inception  when 
he  was  a  youth,  and  his  advancement  has  been  the  result  of  his  com- 
prehensive experience  and  his  close  and  effective  application.     In 
the  early  years  he  was  allied  with  the  well  known  commission  firm 
of  S.  H.  McCrea  &  Co.,  which  at  that  time  held  marked  precedence  in 
this  field  of  enterprise  and  in  its  representation  on  the  Board  of 
Trade.    In  1882  Mr.  Nichols  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Young 
&  Nichols,  and  he  was  largely  instrumental  in  bringing  the  same  to 
its  position  of  prominence  and  influence  as  one  of  the  strong  and 
reliable  concerns  in  the  grain  trade.    With  this  firm  he  continued  his 
association  until  1908,  when  he  retired  from  active  business,  since 
which  time  he  has  continued  his  membership  in  and  maintained  an 
earnest  interest  in  everything  concerning  the  welfare  of  the  Board 
of  Trade.     He  is  one  of  the  appreciative  and  progressive  business 
men  of  the  city  that  has  been  his  home  from  his  youth  and  in  the 
public  schools  of  which  he  continued  his  studies  until  he  had  com- 
pleted the  curriculum  of  the  high  school.    As  a  young  man  he  served 


240  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

with  characteristic  vigor  and  loyalty  as  a  member  of  the  Illinois 
National  Guard,  in  which  he  rose  to  the  office  of  captain  of  Com- 
pany K,  First  Regiment  of  Infantry,  which  has  long  been  known 
as  the  "Dandy  First,"  and  the  record  of  which  is  a  matter  of  dis- 
tinct pride  to  the  citizens  of  Chicago.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Chi- 
cago Club  and  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association,  and  both  he  and 
his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Third  Presbyterian  church  of 
Chicago.  George  Roseman  Nichols  was  born  at  St.  Johns,  New 
Brunswick,  on  the  7th  of  April,  1853,  and  is  a  son  of  William  Paul 
and  Marion  (Roseman)  Nichols,  who  were  residents  of  Chicago 
at  the  time  of  their  death,  and  who  came  to  Chicago  in  1853.  On  the 
8th  of  February,  1883,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Captain 
Nichols  to  Miss  Mary  G.  Holmes,  of  Chicago,  and  they  became  the 
parents  of  two  sons,  of  whom  the  elder,  William  Holmes  Nichols, 
died  at  the  age  of  twenty-one  years.  The  younger  son,  George  Rose- 
man Nichols,  Jr.,  maintains  his  home  in  Chicago  and  is  engaged  in 
the  manufacturing  business. 

Oliver  S.  Nickels. — From  the  initiation  of  his  association  with 
practical  business  afifairs  until  the  present  time  Mr.  Nickels  has  been 
identified  with  the  grain  commission  trade  in  Chicago,  and  here  he 
has  held  since  1899  a  seat  on  the  Board  of  Trade.  His  business 
operations  are  now  conducted  entirely  in  an  independent  and  indi- 
vidual way,  his  offices  being  in  the  Postal  Telegraph  Building,  and 
through  his  energy,  good  judgment  and  progressive  and  reliable 
methods  he  has  come  into  control  of  a  substantial  and  representative 
commission  business,  the  while  he  is  a  loyal  and  popular  member 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  is  well  entitled  to  recognition  in  this 
history  of  that  great  commercial  organization  of  the  western 
metropolis.  Mr.  Nickels  was  born  in  the  City  of  Aurora,  Illinois, 
on  the  6th  of  June,  1877,  and  is  a  son  of  Frederick  K.  and  Caroline 
(Weise)  Nickels.  The  major  part  of  his  early  educational  discipline 
was  acquired  in  the  public  schools  of  Chicago,  and  in  1890  he  entered 
the  employ  of  C.  A.  Whyland,  a  commission  merchant  of  the  Board 
of  Trade.  He  made  advancement  through  his  own  ability  and  efforts 
and  gained  later  a  valuable  experience  during  his  association  in  turn 
with  the  firms  of  Carrington,  Patton  &  Co.,  and  C.  H.  Canby  &  Co. 
His  individual  operations  as  a  commission  broker  were  instituted  in 
1906  and  he  is  known  as  one  of  the  able  and  successful  brokers  repre- 
sented on  the  Board  of  Trade.  In  the  time-honored  Masonic  fra- 
ternity Mr.  Nickels  has  received  the  maximum  degrees  of  the  York 
Rite,  as  a  member  of  Siloam  Commandery,  Knights  Templars,  and 
is  affiliated  also  with  Medinah  Temple  of  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order 
of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  In  a  social  way  he  is  identified 
with  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association  and  the  South  Shore  Country 
Club.  On  the  14th  of  June,  1900,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of 
Mr.  Nickels  to  Miss  Harriet  B.  Anderson,  of  Chicago,  and  they  have 
one  son,  LaFern  H. 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  241 

James  Norris. — A  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  June  28, 
1899,  Mr.  Norris  has  been  active  and  successful  in  his  utilization  of 
its  privileges  and  functions  and  is  a  man  whose  ability  and  energy 
have  given  him  prominence  and  influence  in  connection  with  the 
grain  business  in  the  western  metropolis,  where  he  is  the  executive 
head  of  the  Norris  Grain  Company.  James  Norris  was  born  in  the 
city  of  Montreal,  Canada,  on  the  10th  of  December,  1878,  and  is  a 
son  of  James  Sylvester  Norris  and  Eleanor  (Wand)  Norris.  He 
was  afforded  in  his  native  city  excellent  educational  advantages, 
including  those  of  the  high  school  and  the  Montreal  Collegiate  In- 
stitute. Mr.  Norris  since  coming  to  Chicago  has  been  virtually  in 
uninterrupted  assocition  with  the  grain  trade,  through  the  medium 
of  which  he  has  achieved  success  worthy  of  the  name.  He  was 
for  some  time  connected  with  the  commission  firm  of  Richardson 
&  Co.,  was  later  with  Harris,  Scotten  &  Co.  He  is  now  the  execu- 
tive principal  of  the  Norris  Grain  Company,  which  controls  a  sub- 
stantial and  representative  commission  business.  Mr.  Norris  holds 
membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association,  the  Illinois  Ath- 
letic Club,  the  Exmoor  Country  Club,  the  Swan  Lake  Club  and 
the  Chicago  Automobile  Club.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the 
Protestant  Episcopal  church.  On  the  22d  of  December,  1903,  was 
solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Norris  to  Miss  Ethel  Carlisle 
Dougan,  and  she  passed  to  the  life  eternal  on  the  1st  day  of  July, 
1912,  the  one  surviving  child  being  James  Dougan  Norris. 

John  H.  Norris. — In  July,  1914,  Mr.  Norris  established  himself 
as  a  grain  commision  merchant  in  the  thriving  little  city  of  Hoopes- 
ton,  Vermilion  County,  Illinois,  and  in  the  autumn  of  the  same  year 
he  further  fortified  himself  for  successful  enterprise  along  this  line 
by  acquiring  membership  in  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chi- 
cago. He  is  a  young  man  of  energy,  ambition  and  progressiveness 
and  prior  to  engaging  independently  in  the  grain  business  he  had 
gained  valuable  experience  of  a  practical  order,  so  that  his  success 
in  his  chosen  sphere  of  endeavor  has  come  as  a  natural  result.  In 
connection  with  his  association  with  the  Board  of  Trade  he  is  for- 
tunate in  having  as  his  Chicago  correspondent  the  important  and 
representative  commission  firm  of  Lamson  Brothers  &  Co.  He  has 
developed  a  substantial  business  as  a  grain  broker  and  at  Hoopeston 
he  is  also  the  junior  member  of  the  firm  of  Burton  &  Norris,  which 
here  conducts  a  modern  and  well-equipped  furniture  store.  A 
member  of  a  family  of  three  children,  Mr.  Norris  was  born  at 
Hoopeston,  December  5,  1884,  and  he  is  a  son  of  Dr.  John  H.  and 
Anna  (Lukens)  Norris,  his  father  having  been  a  representative 
physician  and  surgeon  of  Vermilion  County  at  the  time  of  his  death 
and  his  widow  being  still  a  resident  of  Hoopeston.  John  H.  Norris 
gained  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city 
and  as  a  youth  he  learned  the  trade  of  telegraphy.  For  some  time 
he  was  employed  as  an  operator  in  the  office  of  the  Western  Union 


242  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Telegraph  Company  at  Danville,  Illinois,  but  his  ambition  finally  led 
him  to  take  a  position  with  the  well-known  grain  dealer,  S.  H. 
Greeley,  of  Champaign,  this  State.  Later  he  was  similarly  associ- 
ated with  W.  N.  Ferguson,  of  the  same  city,  and  this  alliance  con- 
tinued until  he  established  his  present  independent  business  as  a 
grain  commission  merchant  at  Hoopeston.  In  politics  he  gives  his 
allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  and  he  takes  most  loyal  interest 
in  everything  touching  the  welfare  of  his  native  city  and  county.  In 
1911  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Norris  to  Miss  Olga 
Browne,  daughter  of  Garrett  Browne,  of  Hoopeston,  and  the  two 
children  of  this  union  are  John  G.  and  Robert. 

William  W.  Norris. — Among  those  vigorous  and  far-sighted 
members  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  who  have  here  projected 
themselves  gallantly  into  the  realm  of  large  and  worthy  achievement 
and  proved  effectively  their  powers  as  factors  in  the  cash  and  specu- 
lative grain  trade,  William  W.  Norris  must  be  accorded  a  place  of 
prominence,  in  all  of  his  many  and  varied  operations  as  one  of  the 
captains  of  industry  represented  on  the  Board  he  has  so  carefully 
and  honorably  guided  his  course  as  to  aid  in  upholding  the  high 
prestige  of  that  aggressive  and  important  body,  his  membership 
having  covered  a  period  of  nearly  thirty-five  years.  Mr.  Norris 
claims  the  fine  old  Empire  State  as  the  place  of  his  nativity,  and 
came  with  his  parents  to  Illinois  when  he  was  about  three  years  of 
age.  He  was  born  at  Clymer,  Chautauqua  County,  New  York,  on 
the  30th  of  January,  1853,  and  is  a  son  of  William  W.  and  Theodocia 
(Phinney)  Norris,  who  likewise  were  natives  of  New  York  State  and 
were  residents  of  Marengo,  Illinois,  at  the  time  of  their  death,  the 
father  having  given  the  greater  part  of  his  active  career  to  the  voca- 
tion of  merchant.  He  was  also  an  extensive  traveler,  a  keen  observer 
and  consequently  a  man  of  wide  intelligence.  Mr.  Norris  attended  the 
public  schools  of  Marengo  until  he  had  completed  the  curriculum 
thereof,  and  later  attended  the  old  Chicago  University  for  one  year, 
after  which  he  entered  the  ranks  of  the  pedagogic  profession,  as  a 
representative  of  which  he  was  a  successful  teacher  in  the  district 
schools  of  McHenry  County,  an  experience  whose  dignity  and  more 
or  less  austere  prerogatives  he  may  refer  to  as  one  of  the  distinctive 
earlier  phases  of  his  career.  In  search  of  a  broader  and  more  attrac- 
tive field  of  endeavor  Mr.  Norris  came  in  1875  to  Chicago ;  here  his 
advancement  has  represented  the  direct  result  of  his  own  ability, 
close  application  and  steadfast  purpose.  His  membership  on  the 
Board  of  Trade  had  its  inception  in  1882  and  during  the  long  period 
of  intervening  years  he  has  continued  appreciative  of  the  best  ideal 
and  powerful  functions  of  this  organization,  in  which  is  centered 
much  of  the  gigantic  financial  and  industrial  interests  of  the  western 
metropolis.  His  activities  have  touched  normally  and  legitimately 
both  the  cash  and  speculative  departments  of  the  grain  trade,  his 
knowledge  concerning  which  has  become  broad,  exact  and  authorita- 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  243 

tive.  From  1886  to  1900  Mr.  Norris  found  an  assured  field  of  activity 
through  his  association  with  the  firm  of  G.  H.  McCrea  &  Co.  from 
the  latter  year  to  1916  he  has  continued  in  the  commission  trade 
as  head  of  the  firm  of  W.  W.  Norris  &  Co.  He  now  finds  definite 
prestige  through  his  identification  with  the  Albert  Dickinson  Com- 
pany, a  leading  seed  firm,  and  the  William  Nash  Company,  of  which 
latter  he  is  secretary.  Mr.  Norris  has  entered  fully  into  the  strong 
current  of  commercial  life  in  Chicago  and  has  proved  himself  most 
appreciative  and  loyal  as  a  citizen ;  though  he  has  had  no  desire 
to  enter  the  arena  of  practical  politics  or  to  seek  the  honors  of  public 
office.  He  is  an  active  and  popular  member  of  the  Illinois  Club  at 
113  South  Ashland  Avenue  and  the  year  1916  finds  him  giving  a 
careful  administration  as  President  of  this  representative  social 
organization.  He  has  at  the  same  time  the  distinction  of  being 
First  Vice-President  of  the  Empire  State  Society  of  Chicago.  Both 
he  and  his  wife  attend  the  Protestant  Episcopal  Church  of  the 
Epiphany  at  the  corner  of  Ashland  Boulevard  and  Adams  Street. 
On  the  5th  of  October,  1884,  at  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  was  solemn- 
ized the  marriage  of  Mr.  Norris  to  Miss  Nellie  Lilley.  They  have 
two  daughters,  Helen,  who  remains  at  the  parental  home,  and  Kath- 
erine,  who  is  the  wife  of  Fred  D.  Coambs. 

C.  Jay  Northup. — Active  membership  in  the  Board  of  Trade 
has  been  maintained  by  Charles  J.  Northup  since  June,  1887,  and 
within  the  intervening  years  he  has  become  a  prominent  and  influ- 
ential representative  of  the  grain  commission  business,  of  which 
he  has  been  a  successful  exponent  in  an  individual  or  independent 
way  since  his  retirement,  in  the  autumn  of  1914,  from  the  well- 
known  firm  of  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Chandler,  his  withdrawal  from 
this  alliance  having  taken  place  shortly  after  the  death  of  his  hon- 
ored coadjutor,  Mr.  Warren.  Mr.  Northup  was  born  at  Rome, 
Oneida  County,  New  York,  on  the  14th  of  April,  1862,  and  is  a 
son  of  Charles  and  Helen  Eliza  (Bradt)  Northup,  his  father  having 
served  with  marked  distinction  as  a  gallant  soldier  of  the  Union 
during  the  Civil  War,  in  which  he  held  the  office  of  Major  of  the 
Ninety-seventh  New  York  Volunteer  Infantry.  After  having 
availed  himself  of  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
place  Mr.  Northup  there  prosecuted  a  higher  course  of  study  in 
Rome  Academy.  After  leaving  school  he  found  employment  in 
an  insurance  office  at  Rome,  and  in  1879,  at  the  age  of  seventeen 
years,  he  came  to  Chicago,  where  for  the  ensuing  three  years  he 
was  associated  with  the  wholesale  grocery  business.  He  then  en- 
tered the  employ  of  the  great  meat-packing  concern  of  Armour 
&  Co.,  with  which  he  continued  his  alliance  until  1886.  He  then 
became  associated  with  his  uncle,  the  late  Willett  Northup,  one  of 
the  old,  honored  and  influential  operators  on  the  Board  of  Trade, 
and  it  was  under  specially  auspicious  conditions  that  he  initiated  his 
active  career  in  the  grain  commission  business.     He  eventually  be- 


244  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

came  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Co.,  which  later 
assumed  its  present  title,  that  of  Hulburd,  Warren  &  Chandler, 
retiring  from  this  firm  in  1914  upon  the  death  of  Mr.  Warren.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association  and  the  Flossmoor 
Country  Club,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian 
church.  On  the  26th  of  May,  1885,  was  solemnized  the  marriage 
of  Mr.  Northup  to  Miss  Georgia  Helen  Menzies,  of  Wallingford, 
Vermont,  and  their  only  child  is  a  daughter,  Helen  M. 

David  A.  Noyes. — Among  the  reliable  and  progressive  brok- 
erage firms  found  represented  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City 
of  Chicago  is  that  of  Noyes  &  Jackson,  and  in  his  successful  activities 
the  senior  member  of  the  firm,  David  Allan  Noyes,  is  fortified  by 
an  experience  that  has  involved  association  with  the  Board  since 
his  youth.  He  is  one  of  the  steadfast  and  popular  exponents  of 
the  commission  trade  in  Chicago  and  has  been  a  constituent  mem- 
ber of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  1890,  and  he  served  one  year  as  a 
member  of  its  Directorate.  Mr.  Noyes  was  born  at  La  Porte,  Indi- 
ana, on  the  7th  of  March,  1867,  and  is  a  son  of  Rev.  George  C.  Noyes, 
D.  D.,  and  Eliza  Ellen  (Smith)  Noyes,  his  father  having  been  an 
able  and  influential  Presbyterian  clergyman.  The  family  moved  to 
Evanston,  Illinois,  in  1868  and  David  A.  Noyes  completed  a  course 
in  the  high  school  of  that  city  in  1885.  In  1886,  when  nineteen  years 
of  age,  he  became  associated  with  the  commission  grain  trade  and 
incidentally  with  the  operations  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago. 
His  experience  has  run  the  full  gamut  in  this  connection  and  his 
advancement  from  mere  clerical  position  to  that  of  a  representative 
member  of  the  Board  and  of  the  great  cash  and  speculative  trade 
in  grain  has  been  gained  through  close  application  and  ambitious 
effort.  In  earlier  years  he  was  in  turn  associated  in  the  commission 
business  with  Arthur  Orr,  with  Carrington,  Hannah  &  Co.,  with 
J.  F.  Harris,  and  with  Finley  Barrell  &  Co.  The  firm  of  Noyes  & 
Jackson,  of  which  he  is  senior  member,  was  formed  in  1908,  and 
his  partners  are  William  C.  Jackson,  Louis  J.  Weigle  and  Solomon 
Sturges.  Appreciative  of  all  that  the  great  city  of  Chicago  repre- 
sents in  commercial,  industrial  and  civic  Hnes,  Mr.  Noyes  is  most, 
loyal  and  progressive  as  a  citizen.  He  holds  membership  in  the 
Chicago  Club,  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association  and  the  Glen  View 
Country  Club.  On  the  4th  of  August,  1892,  Mr.  Noyes  married 
Miss  Emma  Reed  BulHs,  and  he  resides  at  the  Glen  View  Club,  Golf, 
Illinois. 

Edward  H.  Noyes. — The  late  Edward  Horatio  Noyes  was  a 
man  whose  character  and  services  gave  him  honorable  prominence 
and  prestige  in  connection  with  the  operations  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  he  was  one  of  those  strong,  vigorous 
and  resourceful  men  whose  interposition  tended  to  lend  dignity  to 
the  great  commercial  organization  with  which  he  was  actively 
identified  for  a  long  term  of  years  and  through  the  medium  of  which 


I 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  24S 

he  achieved  definite  success  as  one  of  the  influential  exponents  of  the 
grain  commission  business  in  the  western  metropolis.  He  was  one 
of  the  veteran  and  highly  honored  members  of  the  Board  at  the 
time  of  his  death,  and  to  those  familiar  with  his  character  and  labors 
there  must  appear  a  measure  of  consistency  in  the  fact  that  he  liter- 
ally died  while  still  in  the  harness,  and  that  on  the  very  stage  of  his 
prolonged  and  worthy  business  activities.  On  the  23rd  of  Novem- 
ber, 1915,  while  on  the  floor  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  Mr.  Noyes  was 
suddenly  stricken  with  angina  pectoris,  and  he  was  conveyed  to  the 
office  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Board,  where  he  expired  a  few  minutes 
later,  his  death  having  caused  a  profound  sense  of  loss  and  sorrow 
on  the  part  of  his  fellow  members,  who  had  ever  valued  him  as  the 
noble  man,  the  staunch  friend  and  the  upright  and  successful  busi- 
ness man.  At  the  time  of  his  demise  he  was  not  only  one  of  the 
best  known  commission  merchants  represented  on  the  membership 
roll  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  but  he  was  also  specially  honored  as  a 
veteran  of  the  Union  service  in  the  Civil  War.  Viewing  the  clear 
perspective  of  his  honorable  and  useful  life  and  mindful  of  the  posi- 
tion he  long  maintained  in  connection  with  the  civic  and  business 
life  of  the  city  of  Chicago,  it  is  specially  consonant  that  in  this  publi- 
cation be  entered  a  tribute  to  his  memory  and  a  brief  review  of  his 
career.  Edward  Horatio  Noyes  was  born  in  the  historic  old  town 
of  Brattleboro,  Windham  County,  Vermont,  on  the  18th  of  Septem- 
ber, 1844,  and  thus  at  the  time  of  his  death  he  had  passed  the  Psalm- 
ist's span  of  three  score  years  and  ten.  He  was  a  son  of  Horatio 
Smith  Noyes  and  Mary  A.  (Chandler)  Noyes,  and  in  both  the 
paternal  and  distaff  lines  was  a  scion  of  fine  old  colonial  stock  in 
New  England.  In  the  common  schools  of  the  old  Green  Mountain 
State  he  acquired  his  early  educational  discipline,  and  this  was 
effectively  supplemented  by  a  higher  academic  course  of  study  in 
Norwich  University,  a  semi-military  institution,  at  Northfield,  Ver- 
mont. His  father  was  cashier  of  the  only  bank  then  existing  at 
Brattleboro,  and  his  mother  was  a  daughter  of  Hon.  David  Chandler, 
of  Saxtons  River,  Vermont,  who  was  a  lineal  descendant  of  William 
Chandler,  the  latter  having  come  from  England  and  settled  at  Rox- 
bury,  Massachusetts,  in  1637.  Mr.  Noyes  was  a  youth  of  about 
seventeen  years  at  the  inception  of  the  Civil  War,  and  his  patriotic 
loyalty  found  expression  when  he  tendered  his  aid  in  defense  of  the 
Union  by  enlisting  in  the  Seventh  Squadron  of  the  Rhode  Island 
Cavalry.  With  this  gallant  command  he  proceeded  to  the  front  and 
with  the  same  he  continued  in  service  until  1864,  when  he  received 
his  honorable  discharge.  In  later  years  he  manifested  his  continued 
interest  in  his  old  comrades  by  his  appreciative  affiliation  with  the 
Grand  Army  of  the  Republic,  in  which  he  was  a  member  of  George 
H.  Thomas  Post,  Chicago,  from  virtually  the  time  of  its  organization 
until  his  death.  In  1864,  as  a  steadfast  and  ambitious  young  man  of 
twenty  years,  Mr.  Noyes  came  to  Chicago,  and  here  he  retained 


246  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

until  1869  a  position  with  a  leading  commision  house.  He  then  be- 
came one  of  the  active  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  estab- 
lished himself  independently  in  the  grain  commission  business.  In 
1879  he  organized  and  became  the  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  E.  H. 
Noyes  &  Co.,  and  under  this  title  he  conducted  a  substantial  and 
successful  commission  business  until  1905,  when  the  firm  name  was 
changed  to  Marfield,  Tearse  &  Noyes,  with  which  he  continued  to  be 
actively  identified  as  a  principal  and  valued  advisor  until  the  time 
of  his  death.  Of  all  that  makes  for  loyal  and  liberal  citizenship 
Edward  H.  Noyes  stood  distinctly  exemplar,  and  he  was  known  as 
a  man  of  fine  mental  ken  and  well-fortified  convictions.  He  was 
steadfast  in  his  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party,  kept  in  close 
touch  with  the  thought  and  sentiment  of  the  hour  and  in  his  later 
years,  consonant  with  his  status  as  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  War,  he 
was  a  staunch  advocate  of  national  preparedness  along  military 
lines.  An  appreciative  tribute  appeared  at  the  time  of  his  death  in 
a  paper  published  in  his  native  town,  and  the  concluding  statement 
of  this  estimate  was  as  follows :  "He  was  uniformly  esteemed 
among  his  many  business  associates  and  friends,  fondly  devoted  to 
his  family,  and  was  an  upright  citizen  of  unblemished  character." 
On  the  4th  of  October,  1870,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr. 
Noyes  to  Miss  Mary  C.  Hamilton,  daughter  of  the  late  John  G.  Ham- 
ilton, a  representative  citizen  of  Chicago,  and  Mrs.  Noyes  still  sur- 
vives her  honored  husband,  as  do  also  their  two  sons  and  five 
grandchildren,  all  residents  of  Chicago.  Mr.  Noyes  is  survived  also 
by  two  half-brothers,  Colonel  Charles  Rutherford  Noyes,  of  the 
United  States  Army,  and  William  S.  Noyes,  of  Chicago.  Of  William 
H.  Noyes,  elder  of  the  two  sons  of  the  honored  subject  of  this 
memoir,  individual  mention  is  made  following  this  sketch,  and 
the  younger  son,  Albert  Hamilton  Noyes,  is  Secretary  &  Treasurer 
of  the  Ayer  &  Lord  Tie  Company,  of  Chicago. 

William  H.  Noyes. — As  a  commission  merchant  and  a  member 
of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  his  native  city  Mr.  Noyes  could  ask  no 
greater  distinction  than  to  uphold  the  prestige  long  enjoyed  by  his 
honored  father,  the  late  Edward  H.  Noyes,  to  whom  a  memoir  is 
dedicated  on  other  pages  of  this  publication.  In  his  activities  as  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  Mr.  Noyes  is  well  upholding  the 
honors  of  the  name  which  he  bears  and  he  is  now  connected  with  the 
important  and  influential  brokerage  firm  of  A.  O.  Slaughter  &  Co., 
which  controls  a  representative  stock  and  bond  business  as  well  as 
an  extensive  commision  trade  in  grain,  cotton  and  coflfee,  with  offices 
in  both  Chicago  and  New  York  City.  William  Hamilton  Noyes  was 
born  in  Chicago  on  the  11th  of  March,  1877,  and  is  the  elder  of  the 
two  sons  of  Edward  H.  and  Mary  Cornelia  (Hamilton)  Noyes.  In 
the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  he  continued  his  studies  until  his 
graduation  in  the  Hyde  Park  High  School,  as  a  member  of  the  class 
of  1895,  and  soon  afterward  he  assumed  the  position  of  office  boy  for 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  247 

the  Board  of  Trade  firm  of  Hately  Brothers,  with  which  he  con- 
tinued his  alliance  until  1899  and  with  which  he  won  advancement 
to  the  position  of  provision  buyer.  From  1899  to  1903  he  was  em- 
ployed by  the  McReynolds  Company,  grain  merchants,  as  its  floor 
manager  on  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  in  August  of  the  latter  year 
he  initiated  his  independent  activities  in  the  grain  commission  busi- 
ness. In  the  following  December  he  became  associated  in  business 
with  James  R.  Godman,  and  continued  in  business  under  the  firm 
name  of  Noyes  &  Godman.  This  alliance  obtained  until  1905,  when 
Mr.  Noyes  became  one  of  the  partners  of  the  firm  of  Hulburd,  War- 
ren &  Chandler,  but  in  1906  he  effected  the  organization  of  the  firm 
of  Marfield,  Griffith  &  Co.,  of  which  he  became  Secretary.  Later  he 
served  in  a  similar  capacity  with  the  reorganized  firm  of  Marfield, 
Tearse  &  Noyes  until  1909,  when  he  formed  an  alliance  with  King, 
Farnum  &  Co.  With  this  concern  he  continued  his  active  associa- 
tion for  some  time,  when  he  formed  his  present  important  alliance 
with  the  representative  firm  of  A.  O.  Slaughter  &  Co.  He  has  been  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  many  years,  and  his  loyalty,  zeal  and 
efficiency  as  a  factor  in  the  operations  of  this  great  commercial  body 
have  given  him  secure  vantage  ground  in  the  confidence  and  esteem 
of  his  fellow  members.  In  politics  Mr.  Noyes  is  a  staunch  Repub- 
lican, his  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  and  he 
holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Club  and  the  Chicago  Athletic 
Association,  his  home  being  in  the  attractive  suburban  village  of 
Elmhurst.  On  the  1st  of  March,  1904,  Mr.  Noyes  wedded  Miss  May 
Wells,  of  Chicago,  and  they  have  two  children — William  Hamilton, 
Jr.,  and  Mary  Wells. 

Frank  P.  O'Brien. — The  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago 
claims  as  one  of  its  representative  members  in  the  capital  city  of 
Illinois  the  well-known  broker  whose  name  introduces  this  para- 
graph and  who  controls  at  Springfield  a  substantial  business  as  a 
broker  in  stocks,  grain,  provisions,  etc.,  with  private  wire  facilities 
connecting  his  offices  with  St.  Louis,  Chicago  and  New  York.  He 
has  held  membership  on  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  since  1902, 
and  is  one  of  its  popular  and  enterprising  representatives  in  his 
chosen  field  of  operations.  Mr.  O'Brien  was  born  at  Springfield, 
III.,  July  18,  1866,  and  is  a  son  of  Dennis  and  Marcella  (O'Brien) 
O'Brien,  his  father  having  been  for  many  years  identified  with  rail- 
road operations  and  having  thus  continued  until  his  death,  which 
occurred  in  1905.  Frank  P.  O'Brien  acquired  his  early  education  in 
the  parochial  and  public  schools  and  as  a  youth  he  learned  the  trade 
of  telegraphist,  his  services  as  an  expert  telegraph  operator  having 
continued  until  the  year  1899,  when  he  became  associated  with  W.  H. 
Reed,  who  was  at  the  time  a  prominent  exponent  of  the  grain  trade 
at  Springfield.  Mr.  O'Brien  continued  his  services  as  chief  clerk 
and  telegraph  operator  with  Mr.  Reed's  firm  until  1902,  when  he 
established  his  present  independent  brokerage  business.    A  number 


248  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

of  years  ago  he  was  actively  identified  with  the  newspaper  business 
in  Chicago,  his  ability  as  a  telegraph  operator  having  made  his  ser- 
vices in  such  connection  especially  effective.  He  has  been  essen- 
tially one  of  the  world's  productive  workers  and  has  achieved  success 
and  independence  entirely  through  his  own  ability,  integrity  of  pur- 
pose and  well-directed  endeavors.  He  is  known  and  valued  as  one 
of  the  progressive  business  men  and  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizens 
of  Springfield  and  has  a  coterie  of  staunch  friends  among  the  mem- 
bers of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade,  which  has  given  him  unrivaled 
facilities  in  the  development  of  his  grain  commission  business,  of 
which  he  is  now  a  leading  representative  in  the  central  part  of 
Illinois. 

George  G.  Omerly. — The  President  of  the  Hancock  Grain  Com- 
pany, one  of  the  influential  concerns  in  the  commission  grain  busi- 
ness in  the  City  of  Philadelphia,  Mr.  Omerly  represents  his  company 
as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago,  and  his 
prominent  status  in  connection  with  the  grain  commerce  of  the  his- 
toric old  Keystone  state  makes  it  specially  gratifying  to  be  able 
to  accord  to  him  consistent  recognition  in  this  history  of  the  great 
commercial  body  with  which  he  has  identified  himself  in  Chicago. 
Mr.  Omerly,  a  member  of  a  family  of  three  children,  was  born  in 
Philadelphia,  in  December,  1864,  and  is  a  son  of  George  G.  and 
Frances  (Ruby)  Omerly,  representatives  of  old  and  honored  Penn- 
sylvania families.  George  G.  Omerly  was  for  many  years  one  of  the 
successful  merchants  and  prominent  and  honored  citizens  of  Phila- 
delphia, where  he  continued  his  association  with  mercantile  enter- 
prise until  the  time  of  his  death.  He,  whose  name  introduces  this 
article,  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  for  his 
early  education,  and  shortly  after  leaving  the  high  school  he  became 
identified  with  the  grain  business,  in  connection  with  which  he  has 
pressed  forward  to  the  goal  of  large  and  successful  achievement,  as 
indicated  by  the  influential  position  which  is  now  his  as  President  of 
the  Hancock  Grain  Company  and  as  one  of  the  members  of  the  Phila- 
delphia Commercial  Exchange,  besides  which  he  holds  a  member- 
ship in  the  New  York  Produce  Exchange.  Mr.  Omerly  has  been 
steadfast  in  his  allegiance  to  the  Republican  party  and  has  given 
effective  service  in  the  promotion  of  its  cause.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Germantown  Republican  Club,  in  the  fine  suburban  district  of 
Germantown,  where  he  maintains  his  residence  and  where  he  is  an 
active  member  also  of  the  Germantown  Automobile  Club,  besides 
which  he  is  a  member  of  the  Union  League  Club  of  Philadelphia, 
both  he  and  his  wife  being  communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episco- 
pal church  in  Germantown.  Mr.  Omerly  was  married  to  Miss  Mar- 
guerite Dihel,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Dihel,  of  Philadelphia,  and 
three  children  have  been  born  of  this  union. 

Fred  A.  Paddleford. — The  youthful  novitiate  of  the  active  busi- 
ness career  of  Fred  Adams  Paddleford  was  one  of  brief  association 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  249 

with  a  lumber  concern,  and  upon  severing  this  connection  he  became 
concerned  with  the  commission  grain  business  and  with  the  opera- 
tions of  the  Board  of  Trade.  His  initiation  in  this  important  field 
of  commercial  enterprise  occurred  in  June,  1882,  and  it  may  readily 
be  understood  that  the  passing  years  have  given  him  broad  and 
varied  experience  and  made  him  an  expert  and  virtual  authority  in 
all  details  of  the  grain  trade  as  represented  in  the  operations  of  the 
great  commercial  body,  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago, 
of  which  he  has  been  an  active  member  since  February  3,  1896.  He 
has  been  a  resident  of  Chicago  since  boyhood  and  in  his  civic  atti- 
tude and  business  activities  he  has  fully  exemplified  the  progressive 
spirit  that  has  significantly  animated  the  vigorous  metropolis  of  the 
west.  Fred  Adams  Paddleford  was  born  at  Janesville,  Wisconsin, 
on  the  17th  of  June,  1866,  and  is  a  son  of  Lorenzo  S.  and  Jennie 
Elizabeth  (Gleason)  Paddleford,  who  were  pioneers  of  that  state  and 
representatives  of  sterling  families  that  were  founded  in  America 
in  the  colonial  era  of  our  national  history.  In  the  public  schools 
Fred  A.  Paddleford  continued  his  studies  until  he  had  completed 
the  curriculum  of  the  grammar  school,  and  he  was  but  sixteen 
years  of  age  when  he  began  his  services,  in  a  minor  clerical  capacity, 
with  one  of  the  prominent  commission  firms  represented  on  the 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade.  His  advancement  was  won  by  ability  and 
close  application  and  for  a  long  term  of  years  he  has  conducted  an 
independent  and  substantial  grain  commission  business,  under  the 
title  of  F.  A.  Paddleford.  His  offices  are  maintained  in  the  Board 
of  Trade  Building  and  he  has  been  loyal  and  zealous  in  supporting 
the  best  traditions  and  the  progressive  policies  of  the  Board,  among 
whose  members  his  popularity  is  of  the  most  unequivocal  order. 
In  former  years  Mr.  Paddleford  was  actively  and  appreciatively  con- 
nected with  the  Illinois  National  Guard,  in  which  he  was  first  iden- 
tified with  the  Fourth  and  later  the  First  Regiment  of  Infantry.  He 
rose  to  the  rank  of  first  lieutenant,  an  office  of  which  he  was  the  in- 
cumbent from  March,  1890,  until  the  4th  of  the  following  December, 
and  he  is  now  a  member  of  the  veteran  corps  of  the  First  Regiment. 
His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  Republican  party,  and  he 
holds  membership  in  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association  and  the  Wis- 
consin Society  of  Chicago.  On  the  15th  of  October,  1889,  was  sol- 
emnized the  marriage  of  Mr.  Paddleford  to  Miss  Mary  Maynard 
Hubbard,  and  their  only  child  is  Helen  Gertrude,  who  is  now  the 
wife  of  Raymond  E.  Duplessis,  of  Chicago. 

Lee  W.  Pardridge.— In  February,  1916,  Lee  Wellington  Pard- 
ridge  resumed  his  active  association  with  the  Board  of  Trade,  as 
one  of  its  vital  and  popular  younger  members  and  as  one  who  had 
previously  shown  success  proclivities  in  connection  with  this  great 
commercial  organization  of  his  native  city.  In  his  activities  as  a 
broker  on  the  Board  of  Trade  he  is  upholding  the  prestige  of  the 
family  name,  which  has  been  one  of  marked  prominence  and  influ- 


250  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

ence  in  connection  with  civic  and  business  affairs  in  Chicago.  Mr. 
Pardridge  was  born  in  Chicago  on  the  30th  of  October,  1887,  and 
is  a  son  of  Charles  A.  and  Mary  Gertrude  (Lee)  Pardridge,  his 
father  having  long  been  a  prominent  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
and  his  grandfather,  Charles  Wellington  Pardridge,  having  been 
for  many  years  one  of  the  prominent  and  influential  merchants  and 
real  estate  dealers  of  Chicago.  After  having  passed  through  the 
progressive  grades  of  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  and  com- 
pleted a  course  in  the  University  High  School,  Mr.  Pardridge  was 
for  two  years  a  student  in  the  University  of  Chicago.  On  the  7th 
of  July,  1909,  shortly  after  attaining  to  his  legal  majority,  Mr. 
Pardridge  became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  for  the 
first  year  he  was  associated  with  the  grain  commission  firm  of  W. 
H.  Lake  &  Company.  He  then  engaged  in  the  commission  business 
in  an  independent  and  individual  way  and  under  these  conditions 
he  continued  his  operations  about  two  years.  He  retired  from  his 
activities  on  the  Board  of  Trade  about  the  close  of  the  year  1912, 
but  in  February,  1916,  he  resumed  his  connection  therewith.  Mr. 
Pardridge  is  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association  and  of 
the  Alpha  Delta  Phi  college  fraternity.  In  February,  1916,  was 
solemnized  his  marriage  to  Miss  Jane  Dempsey,  of  Chicago,  and  they 
are  popular  factors  in  the  representative  social  circles  in  which  they 
move. 

Norman  H.  Perrin. — After  a  period  of  prolonged  and  effective 
service  with  the  Western  Union  and  the  Postal  Telegraph  com- 
panies Mr.  Perrin  turned  his  attention  to  the  brokerage  business 
and  he  has  become  one  of  the  successful  and  vigorous  representatives 
of  this  important  line  of  enterprise  in  the  city  of  Chicago.  His  oper- 
ations, as  junior  member  of  the  firm  of  Massey  &  Perrin,  include 
a  general  brokerage  business  in  which  special  attention  is  given  to 
the  handling-  of  high-grade  mining  stocks,  bank  stocks  and  invest- 
ment stocks,  besides  which  the  firm  controls  a  substantial  and  repre- 
sentative grain  commission  business,  Mr.  Perrin  having  been  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  since  1914.  Mr.  Perrin  was  born  at 
Bradford,  Simcoe  county,  Province  of  Ontario,  Canada,  on  the  27th 
of  January,  1864,  and  is  a  son  of  Hiram  and  Catherine  (Dent)  Per- 
rin. His  early  educational  advantages  were  those  afforded  in  the 
public  schools  of  his  native  province,  and  as  a  boy  he  became  a 
telegraph  messenger  at  Bradford  for  the  Montral  Telegraph  Com- 
pany. He  showed  marked  facility  in  acquiring  a  knowledge  of  the 
art  of  telegraphy,  as  is  shown  by  the  fact  that  at  the  expiration 
of  one  year  he  was  sufficiently  expert  to  be  promoted  to  the  position 
of  assistant  operator.  Finally  he  went  to  Buffalo,  New  York,  and 
entered  service  as  an  operator  in  the  employ  of  the  Western  Union 
Telegraph  Company.  In  1881  he  came  to  Chicago  and  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Mutual  Union  Telegraph  Company,  with  which  he 
continued  until  1883,  when  he  entered  the  offices  of  the  Western 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  251 

Union  Telegraph  Company.  The  estimate  placed  upon  him  by  this 
great  corporation  was  eventually  shown  in  his  advancement  to  the 
responsible  position  of  office  manager  in  Chicago,  and  of  this  post 
he  continued  the  incumbent  until  1900,  when  he  identified  himself 
with  the  brokerage  business.  He  was  associated  with  various  repre- 
sentative brokerage  concerns  until  1904,  when  he  formed  an  alliance 
with  Harry  A.  Massey,  with  whom  he  has  since  continued  his  part- 
nership association,  under  the  firm  name  of  Massey  &  Perrin.  The 
business  of  the  firm  has  been  largely  in  the  handling  of  high-class 
securities,  and  it  has  direct  representation  on  the  Chicago  Stock 
Exchange  as  well  as  the  Board  of  Trade.  Mr.  Perrin  is  a  Demo- 
crat in  his  political  allegiance,  is  affiliated  with  the  Masonic  fra- 
ternity and  the  National  Union,  and  holds  membership  in  the  Ber- 
wyn  Club.  On  the  7th  of  October,  1883,  was  solemnized  the  mar- 
riage of  Mr.  Perrin  to  Miss  Marie  Casey,  of  Chicago,  and  they  have 
three  children.  Marie,  Leslie  and  Charles. 

Wilson  H.  Perrine. — One  of  the  essentially  representative  and 
influential  concerns  in  the  grain  commission  trade  in  Chicago  is 
the  corporation  of  which  Wilson  Hamilton  Perrine  is  president  and 
which  carried  forward  its  operations  under  the  title  of  W.  H.  Per-- 
rine  &  Company,  with  offices  at  140  West  Van  Buren  street.  The 
functions  of  the  corporation  thus  designated  involve  a  commission 
business  in  both  cash  and  futures,  and  include  the  operation  of  its 
own  chain  of  country  elevators,  the  enterprise  being  one  of  wide 
scope  and  importance  and  one  guided  and  governed  by  the  strictest 
code  of  reliability  and  consistent  conservatism.  Mr.  Perrine's  ex- 
perience in  the  grain  business  has  been  protracted  and  varied  and 
has  given  to  him  authoritative  status  in  connection  with  this  im- 
portant phase  of  commercial  activity.  Mr.  Perrine  was  born  in 
Steuben  county.  New  York,  on  the  24th  of  April,  1866,  and  is  a  son 
of  WMlliam  Willson  Perrine  and  Mary  (Brown)  Perrine,  who  re- 
moved to  the  state  of  Missouri  when  he  was  a  child,  the  major  part 
of  the  father's  active  business  career  having  been  one  of  close  and 
effective  association  with  farming.  In  the  public  schools  of  Cam- 
eron, Clinton  county,  Missouri,  Mr.  Perrine  acquired  his  earlier  edu- 
cational discipline,  which  was  supplemented  by  the  best  advantages 
of  higher  academic  order.  His  studies  were  continued  in  turn  in 
Williston  Seminary,  at  Easthampton,  Massachusetts ;  Dansville 
Seminary,  at  Dansville,  Livingston  county.  New  York,  the  high 
school  at  Amherst,  Massachusetts,  and  historic  old  Amherst  Col- 
lege, in  which  he  was  graduated  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1888 
and  from  which  he  received  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 

Shortly  after  leaving  college  Mr.  Perrine  assumed  a  clerical 
position  in  the  American  National  Bank  of  Kansas  City,  Missouri, 
and  in  this  representative  institution  he  held  the  office  of  teller 
until  1893,  when  he  initiated  his  active  association  with  the  grain 
business,  in  which  it  has  been  his  to  gain  distinctive  success  and 


252  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

prestige.  From  1893  to  1896  he  was  allied  with  the  firm  of  Davison 
&  Smith,  prominent  grain  merchants  in  Kansas  City,  and  in  the  lat- 
ter year  he  engaged  in  the  same  line  of  enterprise  in  an  independent 
way,  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Perrine  Brothers.  This  alliance 
continued,  with  headquarters  in  Kansas  City,  until  1900,  when  Mr. 
Perrine  came  to  Chicago  and  formed  a  connection  with  Richardson 
&  Company,  in  charge  of  whose  cash  grain  department  he  continued 
until  1904,  when  he  assumed  a  similar  position  with  the  Harris- 
Scotten  Company.  In  this  connection  he  continued  his  well  ordered 
activities  until  1906,  when  he  formed  the  firm  of  W.  H.  Perrine  & 
Company,  which  is  incorporated  under  the  laws  of  the  state  and  of 
which  he  is  president.  His  administration  has  been  marked  by 
progressive  policies  and  scrupulous  regard  for  the  interests  of  all 
clients,  and  the  business  brought  to  the  front  rank  in  the  immense 
grain  commission  trade  that  is  centered  in  Chicago.  The  business, 
organized  and  operated  at  first  in  a  limited  way,  proved  remarkably 
successful  from  the  start,  the  rapid  growth  and  expansion  which 
followed  rendering  necessary  greatly  increased  facilities,  which  are 
in  part  represented  by  the  maintenance  to-day  of  a  leased  private 
wire  from  Chicago  to  St.  Louis,  while  there  have  been  established 
by  the  company  branch  offices  in  six  of  the  principal  grain  centers 
of  the  state,  besides  which  provision  has  been  made  for  augmenting 
this  number  in  the  near  future.  In  addition  to  his  activities  in  con- 
nection with  the  house  which  bears  his  name,  Mr.  Perrine  has  found 
time  and  opportunity  to  apply  constructive  effort  elsewhere.  In 
1909  he  organized  the  well-known  grain  and  commission  house  of 
Rumsey,  Moore  &  Company,  with  headquarters  at  Peoria,  Illinois, 
and  he  has  served  as  its  president  since  its  organization.  He  is  also 
secretary  of  the  Prairie  State  Grain  Elevator  Company,  of  Chicago. 
Mr.  Perrine  has  held  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  since 
January,  1900,  and  is  one  of  the  loyal  and  popular  contingent  that 
has  been  influential  in  the  directing  of  the  affairs  of  this  important 
institution,  of  which  he  served  as  a  director  for  two  terms,  besides 
which  he  was  for  a  period  of  five  years  a  member  of  the  committee 
of  appeals  of  the  State  Grain  Inspection  Commission.  Mr.  Perrine 
is  fully  appreciative  of  the  functions  and  privileges  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  and  among  its  members  his  personal  popularity  is  of  un- 
equivocal order.  As  a  citizen  he  is  thoroughly  en  rapport  with  the 
progressive  spirit  that  animates  Chicago,  and  he  takes  a  lively  in- 
terest in  all  things  that  tend  to  advance  the  city  along  both  civic 
and  material  lines.  He  maintains  his  home  in  the  beautiful  sub- 
urban city  of  Evanston,  and  the  attractive  family  residence,  at  1130 
Lake  Shore  Drive,  is  a  center  of  gracious  hospitality  of  much  repre- 
sentative social  activity.  He  holds  membership  in  the  University 
Club  of  Evanston  and  the  Glen  View  Golf  Club,  besides  which  he 
is  afifiliated  with  the  Delta  Upsilon  fraternity  of  his  alma  mater, 
Amherst  College,  where  he  held  the  office  of  the  president  of  the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  253 

chapter  of  this  organization  during  his  senior  year.  He  and  his 
family  hold  membership  in  the  Second  Presbyterian  Church  of 
Evanston.  On  the  23rd  of  November,  1899,  was  solemnized  the 
marriage  of  Mr.  Perrine  to  Miss  Grace  Morgan  Halbert,  of  Kansas 
City,  Missouri,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Sarah  Gertrude. 

Bemhard  Pfaelzer. — Success  in  any  calling  is  an  indication  of 
close  application  and  industry,  and  the  world  is  made  better  by  the 
life  of  every  successful  man.  Among  those  active  in  business  circles 
of  Chicago  to-day  who  have  established  a  substantial  reputation 
for  integrity,  and  achieved  honorable  success  on  the  board  of  Trade, 
none  is  more  worthy  of  mention  in  a  work  of  this  character  than 
Bemhard  Pfaelzer,  founder  and  executive  head  of  the  firm  of  Bern- 
hard  Pfaelzer  &  Sons,  commission  merchants  and  dealers  in  grain, 
hay  and  millstuff.  His  rise  to  distinction  is  the  result  of  his  own 
efforts,  and  his  career  demonstrates  what  a  man  can  do  if  he  has 
pluck  and  perseverance.  Mr.  Pfaelzer  was  born  in  Laudenbach, 
Grand  Duchy  of  Baden,  Germany,  April  26,  1856,  a  son  of  Moses 
and  Hannah  (Daube)  Pfaelzer.  He  comes  of  old  established  fam- 
ilies prominent  in  the  history  of  Germany  for  many  generations,  and 
he  fully  exemplifies  the  alert,  enterprising  character  for  which  the 
German  race  has  always  been  noted.  He  had  the  advantage  of  a 
good  education,  his  scholastic  training  being  that  of  private  schools 
and  Weinheim  (Baden)  Gymnasium.  Soon  after  his  graduation 
from  the  latter  institution,  in  1872,  he  became  associated  with  his 
father  in  the  grain  business  at  Laudenbach,  Germany,  and  he  con- 
tinued in  active  commercial  pursuits  at  that  place  for  ten  years, 
meanwhile  serving  three  years  in  the  German  army,  being  attached 
to  the  Second  Baden  Grenadier  Regiment  (Manheim),  Kaiser  Wil- 
helm  No.  110.  Like  many  ambitious  young  men  of  that  country, 
Mr.  Pfaelzer  was  greatly  impressed  by  the  flattering  stories  he  had 
heard  of  America,  and  through  the  influence  of  his  brother,  David 
M.  Pfaelzer  (late  Assessor  of  Cook  county)  who  was  then  living  in 
Chicago,  he  decided  to  cast  his  lot  with  the  western  metropolis. 
Accordingly,  in  1882,  he  bade  adieu  to  the  Fatherland  and  sailed  for 
the  United  States,  coming  direct  to  Chicago.  Soon  after  settling  in 
this  city  he  established  himself  in  his  present  business  at  the  Union 
Stock  Yards,  and  has  since  been  prominently  identified  in  this  field 
of  activity.  For  thirty-four  years  his  time  and  energy  have  been 
devoted  to  the  building  up  of  the  enterprise  with  which  he  is  asso- 
ciated, and  his  name  in  connection  with  any  transaction  has  always 
been  a  guaranty  for  straightforward  and  honorable  dealing.  Dur- 
ing this  entire  period  he  has  done  business  within  a  block  of  where 
he  first  located  in  1882,  and  the  doors  of  his  business  house  have 
constantly  been  open  to  the  public.  Being  a  thorough  business  man, 
and  a  scholar  capable  of  mastering  the  English  language,  he  soon 
built  up  an  extensive  trade,  and  has  become  one  of  the  substantial 
and  influential  men  of  the  city.    On  January  18,  1887,  Mr.  Pfaelzer 


254  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

was  united  in  marriage  with  Miss  Carrie  Keim,  of  Chicago,  a  daugh- 
ter of  Zachariah  and  Eva  (Kohlman)  Keim,  she  being  a  woman 
of  high  character  and  active  in  all  good  work.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Pfaelzer  were  born  two  sons  and  a  daughter.  The  sons  are  both 
active  business  men  of  this  city,  Frederick  M.,  the  elder,  being  asso- 
ciated with  his  father  in  the  firm  of  Bernhard  Pfaelzer  and  Sons, 
while  Jerome  L.  is  engaged  in  the  men's  furnishing  business  with 
his  father-in-law,  Albert  Hoefeld.  The  former  is  a  graduate  of 
Armour  Institute  of  Technology,  receiving  his  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Science  from  that  institution  in  1910,  while  the  latter  is  a  graduate 
from  the  Chicago  high  school,  and  also  a  student  of  the  Armour 
Institute  of  Technology.  The  daughter,  Evelyn  H.  Pfaelzer,  is  at 
home  with  her  parents,  and  is  also  in  school.  The  family  home  for 
many  years  has  been  at  4926  Washington  Park  Court.  It  is  a  hos- 
pitable one,  where  good  cheer  abounds,  and  where  Mr.  Pfaelzer's 
numerous  friends  are  always  welcome.  Although  quiet  and  un- 
assuming in  manner,  Mr.  Pfaelzer  is  recognized  as  a  man  of  earnest 
purpose  and  progressive  principles.  He  has  always  stood  for  the 
things  that  are  right,  and  for  the  advancement  of  citizenship,  and 
is  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  modern  improvements  along 
material,  intellectual  and  moral  lines.  While  he  takes  no  active 
part  in  politics,  he  is  interested  in  political  reform,  and  always  casts 
the  weight  of  his  influence  in  support  of  men  and  measures  working 
for  the  public  good.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade, 
having  joined  that  organization  September  14,  1896,  and  of  the 
Chicago  Live  Stock  Exchange.  He  is  also  identified  with  the  Ma- 
sonic fraternity  and  the  Jewish  church. 

George  H.  Phillips. — In  the  history  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of 
the  City  of  Chicago  are  revealed  many  dramatic  chapters  and  spec- 
tacular features,  and  across  the  bridge  created  by  success  have  fre- 
quently passed  the  weary  feet  of  misfortune.  George  Harshaw 
Phillips  was  a  young  man  who  contributed  such  a  dramatic  chapter 
to  the  history  of  this  great  commercial  organization,  and  even  as 
his  success  was  spectacular  so  were  his  ultimate  financial  reverses  of 
no  equivocal  order,  though  the  same  were  the  result  of  existing 
conditions  rather  than  lack  of  individual  ability  and  steadfast  and 
honorable  purpose.  He  was  one  of  an  appreciable  number  who  were 
caught  between  the  upper  and  nether  millstones  of  inopportune 
conditions,  and,  like  many  another,  he  came  to  a  realization  that 
the  mills  of  the  financial  gods  grind  exceedingly  small.  Through 
his  operations  on  the  Board  of  Trade  George  H.  Phillips  won  the 
title  of  "corn  king,"  and  though  his  fortunes  later  waned,  he  lived 
true  to  his  ideals  until  the  end  of  his  life  and  was  in  the  very  prime 
of  his  manhood  when  he  was  summoned  to  eternal  rest,  his  death 
having  occurred  on  the  17th  of  February,  1916.  Much  is  implied 
when  such  an  estimate  is  given  as  that  voiced  in  the  following  quo- 
tation from  the  American  Elevator  &  Grain  Trade  of  May  15,  1916: 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  255 

"In  the  ultimate,  man  is  measured  by  character,  not  by  money. 
Through  his  successes  and  failures  George  H.  Phillips  will  be  re- 
membered as  a  helpful,  courteous  and  kindly  nature,  a  frank  and 
loyal  spirit,  and,  above  all,  a  man  who  was  constantly  true  to  his 
friends.  He  possessed  in  large  degree  those  qualities  of  honor  that 
make  the  sum  of  enduring  things,  and  therein  must  be  seen  his 
success.  It  will  be  in  these  things  that  he  will  remain  in  the  memory 
of  his  friends;  not  that  he  made  a  fortune  and  lost  it."  George  H. 
Phillips  was  born  at  Morris,  Grundy  county,  Illinois,  on  the  11th 
of  January,  1869,  and  was  a  son  of  Thomas  and  Ellen  (Palliser) 
Phillips.  He  continued  his  studies  in  the  public  schools  until  his 
graduation  in  the  Morris  high  school,  and  on  the  24th  of  August, 
1886,  he  came  to  Chicago  and  entered  upon  his  novitiate  in  the  grain 
commission  business.  He  was  employed  in  turn  by  various  com- 
mission firms,  and  for  several  years  he  was  thus  associated  with 
George  A.  Seaverns.  In  November,  1899,  and  again  in  May,  1901, 
he  engineered  corners  in  corn,  both  of  which  were  successful,  but 
in  August,  1901,  financial  disaster  came  to  him,  though  he  thereafter 
continued  his  modest  operations  in  the  commission  business  until 
the  time  of  his  death.  Mr.  Phillips  gave  his  allegiance  to  the  Demo- 
cratic party,  had  received  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Ancient 
Accepted  Scottish  Rite  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  and  was  a  popular 
member  of  the  Chicago  Athletic  Club.  Mr.  Phillips  was  married  to 
Miss  Bertha  Schubert,  who  survives  him,  as  do  also  their  three 
children,  Nellie,  Thomas  and  George.  From  an  article  that  ap- 
peared in  the  Chicago  Tribune  at  the  time  of  the  death  of  Mr.  Phil- 
lips are  taken,  with  certain  elimination  and  paraphrase,  the  follow- 
ing extracts :  "George  H.  Phillips  was  only  thirty-one  when  he 
won  a  fortune  by  his  operations  in  the  corn  pit  and  came  out  victor 
in  his  battle  of  wits  with  the  most  seasoned  grain  operators  in  the 
country.  His  exploit  won  him  the  title  of  the  'corn  king,'  and  for 
years  it  clung.  Even  in  the  last  year  men  about  the  Board  fre- 
quently pointed  him  out  to  visitors  as  one  of  the  most  spectacular 
figures  of  his  time  in  the  business  world.  How  the  'little  blond  boy 
with  the  big  idea'  came  from  Morris,  Illinois,  and  whipped  the  ex- 
perienced traders  on  the  Chicago  Board  at  their  own  game,  and 
cleaned  up  one  hundred  and  eighty-seven  thousand  dollars  in  corn, 
is  a  feat  old  brokers  are  still  talking  about.  It  was  in  November, 
1900,  that  Mr.  Phillips  stepped  out  of  practical  obscurity  into  the 
limelight.  He  had  worked  for  George  A.  Seaverns  for  five  years, 
starting  as  an  errand  boy  and  climbing  his  way  up  to  foreman. 
Mr.  Seaverns  had  such  faith  in  the  big  ideas  of  the  little  man,  his 
remarkable  nerve  in  speculating,  and  his  almost  uncanny  insight 
into  market  conditions,  that  he  purchased  for  Mr.  Phillips  a  seat  on 
the  Board  of  Trade  in  1892,  when  the  latter  was  only  twenty-four 
years  old.  Mr.  Phillips  acted  as  purchaser  for  Mr.  Seaverns,  doing 
all  of  his  trading  until  the  fall  of  1899,  when  he  organized  the  firm 


256  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

of  George  H.  Phillips  &  Company  and  went  into  business  for  him- 
self." He  traded  in  an  unobtrusive  way  until  November,  1900,  when 
he  attracted  the  attention  of  the  whole  country  by  running  a  corner 
of  three  million  bushels  of  corn,  which  he  sold  at  a  profit  of  one 
hundred  and  eighty-seven  thousand  dollars.  While  the  grain  world 
was  still  gasping,  Mr.  Phillips  stepped  out  the  following  May,  pur- 
chased 14,500,000  bushels  of  corn  and  cleaned  up  an  even  million.  • 
But  the  farmers  profited  as  well  as  he.  It  was  through  the  financial 
backing  of  his  old  friends  at  Morris  and  the  co-operation  of  the 
farmers  that  he  was  able  to  conduct  his  successful  operations.  They 
shared  his  profits,  but  when  the  crash  came  they  were  unwilling  to 
share  his  losses,  and  he  stood  the  gaff  alone.  He  paid  the  profits  to 
his  customers  and  found  himself  burdened  with  the  expense  of  con- 
ducting a  large  commission  business  with  an  enormous  staflf  of 
clerks.  He  was  compelled  to  close  down  his  business  to  find  out 
just  where  he  stood.  In  order  that  his  customers  might  not  suffer 
he  paid  out  one  hundred  thousand  dollars  of  his  own  money  and 
assumed  other  liabilities.  He  built  up  another  gigantic  business 
when  the  second  crash  came,  in  January,  1902,  and  he  was  unable  to 
raise  sufficient  money  to  protect  his  holdings,  so  that  necessity  com- 
pelled him  to  close  his  books."  George  H.  Phillips  was  significantly 
a  man  of  courage  and  resolute  purpose,  even  as  his  integrity  and 
honor  were  inviolable,  and  now  that  his  life  has  come  to  its  close  its 
perspective  is  so  revealed  as  to  portray  the  emblazonment  of  lasting 
distinction  and  credit  upon  him  as  a  man  of  marked  ability  and  of 
sterling  character. 

It  is  but  consistent  that  the  following  significant  estimate  be 
given  place  in  this  memoir : 

GRAIN  GROWERS'  CO-OPERATIVE  ASSOCIATION  OF 

AMERICA 

Resolutions  of  the  Allied  National  Agricultural  Associations 
of  America  conferring  the  Degree  of  Honor  on  George  H.  Phillips 
of  Chicago,  Illinois,  for  meritorious  service  to  the  industry  of  Agri- 
culture. 

Whereas,  we,  the  Allied  National  Agricultural  associations  of 
America,  recognize  the  great  benefit  rendered  to  the  farmers  and 
cattlemen  of  the  country  by  the  recent  high  prices  in  corn  brought 
about  through  the  successful  "Bull"  operation  of  Mr.  George  H. 
Phillips, 

Whereas,  we  desire  to  express  our  approbation  and  approval 
to  any  friend  of  the  farmer  or  agency  that  will  advance  the  price 
of  the  products  of  the  farm  ;  therefore. 

Be  it  resolved,  that  the  thanks  of  this  Allied  Agricultural  Asso- 
ciation be  and  is  hereby  tendered  to  Mr.  George  H.  Phillips,  and 
as  a  further  token  of  our  appreciation  and  esteem  we  elect  him  an 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  257 

"honorary  member"  of  the  National  Grain  Growers  Association  of 
America. 

Resolved  further,  that  in  appreciation  of  his  valuable  and  suc- 
cessful eflorts  in  raising  the  price  of  corn  and  other  farm  products, 
we  do  hereby  confer  the  "Decoration  of  the  Knight  of  the  Golden 
Sheaf"  as  a  further  token  of  our  respect  and  esteem. 

(Signed)     JOHN  C.  HANLEY, 
President  Allied  National  Agricultural  Associations. 

Alvin  H.  Poehler. — A  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago,  Alvin  H.  Poehler  has  the  distinction  of  being  pres- 
ident of  one  of  the  oldest  grain  companies  in  the  United  States,  the 
H.  Poehler  Company,  of  Minneapolis,  which  was  incorporated  in 
1893,  and  which  was  founded  by  his  honored  father,  Henry  Poehler, 
the  story  of  whose  vigorous  life  is  a  very  part  of  the  history  of  Min- 
nesota and  the  great  northwest,  the  business  now  conducted  under 
the  title  of  the  H.  Poehler  Company  having  been  founded  in  185b, 
at  Henderson,  Minnesota,  which  state  at  that  time  had  a  population 
not  exceeding  forty  thousand,  of  whom  about  two-thirds  were  In- 
dians. This  statement  indicates  that  the  late  Henry  Poehler  was 
one  of  the  early  pioneer  settlers  of  Minnesota,  and  it  was  his  to  wield 
large  and  beneficent  influence  in  the  civic  and  material  development 
and  progress  of  the  Gopher  commonwealth,  in  whose  history  his 
name  merits  an  enduring  place  of  honor.  The  sons  of  this  gallant 
pioneer  are  conducting  the  business  which  he  founded  so  many 
years  ago  and  the  H.  Poehler  Company  is  one  of  the  most  important 
in  the  grain  commission  trade  in  Minneapolis,  with  operations  that 
are  far  reaching  and  with  a  reputation  that  has  been  held  inviolable 
during  a  period  of  more  than  sixty  years.  Alvin  H.  Poehler  is 
president  of  the  company  and  Walter  C.  Poehler  is  its  secretary  and 
treasurer.  William  A.  Poehler,  another  of  the  brothers,  is  a  member 
of  the  directorate  of  the  company,  and  still  another  brother,  Charles 
F.,  was  its  vice-president  at  the  time  of  his  death,  in  1913.  It  is 
gratifying  to  be  able  to  present  in  this  connection  a  brief  tribute  to 
the  memory  of  the  late  Hon.  Henry  Poehler,  the  pioneer,  the  strong 
and  noble  man,  and  the  influential  and  honored  citizen  and  captain 
of  industry.  Henry  Poehler  was  born  in  Lippe-Detmold,  Germany, 
in  the  year  1833,  and  he  was  fifteen  years  of  age  when  he  immigrated 
to  the  United  States,  in  1848.  He  became  one  of  the  youthful 
pioneers  of  Iowa,  where  he  settled  in  the  vicinity  of  the  present 
city  of  Burlington,  in  the  latter  part  of  the  year  1848.  In  1853,  he 
was  found  as  a  resident  of  the  village  of  St.  Paul,  Minnesota,  and 
about  a  year  later  he  established  his  home  in  the  embryonic  village 
of  Henderson,  Sibley  County,  where  he  became  associated  with 
Major  Joseph  R.  Brown  in  furnishing  supplies  to  the  army  posts 
and  in  dealing  in  grain.  In  1855,  he  purchased  the  general  merchan- 
dise business  of  Major  Brown  and  under  the  title  of  H.  Poehler  & 


258  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Brother  founded  the  grain  business  that  is  now  conducted  under  the 
title  of  the  H.  Poehler  Company.  In  1858,  which  year  marked  the 
admission  of  Minnesota  to  the  Union,  Mr.  Poehler  was  elected  a 
member  of  its  first  legislature,  and  in  later  years  he  again  served 
as  representative  as  well  as  state  senator,  besides  which  he  repre- 
sented Minnesota  in  the  Forty-sixth  Congress  of  the  United  States. 
At  the  time  when  he  commenced  his  grain  business  all  shipments 
of  grain  were  made  by  boat  from  Henderson  to  La  Crosse,  Wiscon- 
sin, and  thence  by  rail  to  Milwaukee  and  Chicago.  In  1887  he  estab- 
lished in  Minneapolis  the  headquarters  of  his  now  voluminous  grain 
business,  and  the  history  of  its  continued  expansion  has  been  in 
harmony  with  the  splendid  development  and  growth  of  the  city  and 
the  Northwest.  Among  the  leading  grain  commission  merchants 
of  the  Northwest  the  H.  Poehler  Company  has  long  maintained  a 
leading  position.  From  an  interesting  brochure  issued  by  the  com- 
pany on  the  sixtieth  anniversary  of  the  founding  of  the  business 
are  taken  the  following  pertinent  extracts :  "From  the  very  begin- 
ning the  reputation  of  the  H.  Poehler  Company  has  been  built  on 
square  dealing  and  individual  service  to  each  of  its  many  customers. 
The  company  has  weathered  all  of  the  financial  storms  which  have 
swept  over  this  country  from  the  time  of  the  Civil  War  through  the 
turbulent  years  of  1873,  1893  and  1907.  The  company's  business  is 
now  supervised  by  the  two  surviving  sons,  Alvin  H.  and  Walter  C. 
Poehler,  the  former  of  whom  succeeded  to  the  presidency  of  the  com- 
pany upon  the  death  of  his  father.  He  has  been  identified  with  the 
company  and  the  grain  trade  since  1883.  Within  the  intervening 
period  he  served  eight  years  as  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors 
of  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  most  important 
commercial  institution  of  the  Northwest.  Walter  C.  Poehler,  the 
secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  company,  has  been  identified  with  the 
same  since  1896,  and  in  the  meanwhile  he  spent  ten  years  in  the 
upbuilding  of  the  business  at  the  company's  Duluth  office.  No  one 
who  has  ever  dealt  with  this  company  has  lost  a  dollar  to  which 
he  was  entitled,  and  in  this  time  the  company  has  handled  over 
200,000  carloads  of  grain.  Through  these  sixty  years  the  H.  Poehler 
Company  has  marched  steadily  forward,  keeping  always  as  its  star 
the  principles  of  pioneering  progress,  good  will  and  square  dealing 
to  all,  which  were  given  to  it  by  its  founder."  In  1861,  at  Bridgeton, 
Pennsylvania,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Henry  Poehler  to 
Miss  Elizabeth  Frankenfield,  who  survives  him.  They  became  the 
parents  of  three  sons  and  three  daughters,  all  of  whom  are  living 
except  the  son  Charles  F.,  who  was  vice-president  of  the  company  at 
the  time  of  his  sudden  and  untimely  death,  in  June,  1913.  Alvin  H. 
Poehler,  president  of  the  sterling  old  company  of  which  description 
has  been  given,  represents  the  same  in  membership  on  the  Chicago 
Board  of  Trade,  the  Milwaukee  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Duluth 
Board  of  Trade  and  the  Minneapolis  Chamber  of  Commerce,  in  the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  259 

building  of  which  last  named  organization  are  established  the  exten- 
sive offices  of  the  company.  Mr.  Poehler  was  born  at  Henderson, 
Minnesota,  January  15,  1864,  ^nd  after  having  availed  himself  of 
the  advantages  of  the  public  schools  of  his  native  village  he  entered 
the  Shattuck  Military  Academy,  at  Faribault,  Minnesota,  in  which  he 
was  graduated  in  1883,  as  the  valedictorian  of  his  class.  For  a  short 
time  thereafter  he  held  a  position  in  a  banking  institution  at  Hender- 
son, but  in  the  autumn  of  1883  he  became  actively  associated  with 
his  father's  extensive  grain  and  elevator  business,  the  headquarters 
of  which  were  removed  to  Minneapolis  in  1885.  He  became  presi- 
dent of  the  company  at  the  time  of  his  father's  death,  which  occurred 
July  18,  1912.  The  company  maintains  a  branch  office  in  the  Board 
of  Trade  building  in  the  city  of  Duluth.  In  Minneapolis  Mr.  Poehler 
is  also  vice-president  of  the  Pacific  Elevator  Company.  He  is  one  of 
the  active  members  of  the  Minneapolis  Commercial  Club,  holds 
membership  in  the  Mitiikahda  Club,  and  was  the  organizer  of  the 
Interlachen  Country  Club,  of  which  he  was  the  first  president.  He  is 
affiliated  with  both  the  York  and  Scottish  Rite  bodies  of  the  Masonic 
fraternity,  is  a  Democrat  in  politics,  as  was  also  his  honored  father, 
and  he  and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
church.  While  attending  the  military  academy  Mr.  Poehler  was  cap- 
tain of  Company  B  of  the  student  cadets,  and  his  military  experience 
stood  him  in  good  service  in  later  years,  while  he  was  a  member  of 
the  military  staf?  of  Governor  Eberhardt  and  later  of  that  of  Gov- 
ernor Johnson,  with  the  rank  of  colonel.  He  is  now  one  of  the  trus- 
tees of  his  alma  mater,  the  Shattuck  Military  Academy,  and  as  a 
citizen  and  business  man  he  is  liberal  and  public-spirited.  It  may 
further  be  noted  that  the  H.  Poehler  Company  operates  one  terminal 
elevator  and  sixty  grain  elevators  at  different  points  in  Minnesota, 
the  company  retaining  in  its  employ  one  hundred  and  fifty  persons. 
On  the  19th  of  February,  1896,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr. 
Poehler  to  Miss  Eugenia  L.  Cole,  daughter  of  the  late  Emerson  Cole, 
one  of  the  representative  citizens  of  Minneapolis. 

Walton  M.  Prillaman. — The  Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago  claimed 
the  late  Walton  McClain  Prillaman  as  one  of  its  honored  non- 
resident members,  and  he  continued  his  active  association  with  this 
great  commercial  organization  until  his  death,  which  occurred  July 
22,  1916.  He  had  become  one  of  the  prominent  and  successful  ex- 
ponents of  the  grain  business  at  Rossville,  Vermilion  County,  Illi- 
nois, where  he  conducted  his  well-ordered  operations  under  the 
title  of  W.  M.  Prillaman.  His  business  was  far  from  being  of  cir- 
cumscribed order,  for  in  addition  to  his  grain  elevator  at  Rossville 
he  operated  elevators  also  at  Henning,  Vermilion  County,  and  New- 
port, in  the  Indiana  county  of  the  same  name.  A  man  of  fine  char- 
acter and  mature  business  judgment,  he  was  a  practical  authority  in 
the  grain  trade  and  through  his  alliance  therewith  he  gained  both 
success  and  high  reputation.     The  business  which  he  founded  is 


260  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

effectively  continued  by  his  only  son,  Glenn  H.,  who  had  been  his 
able  coadjutor  and  who  had  become  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade  in  1910.  The  son  still  continues  the  operation  of  the  three 
grain  elevators  previously  mentioned  and  conducts  his  large  and 
prosperous  business  under  the  title  of  W.  M.  Prillaman  &  Co.  Wal- 
ton M.  Prillaman  was  born  in  the  State  of  Indiana,  on  the  16th  of 
June,  1856,  and  in  his  youth  he  gained  practical  experience  in  the 
drug  business,  with  which  he  continued  to  be  identified  until  he 
turned  his  attention  to  the  buying  and  shipping  of  grain,  in  1891. 
With  the  latter  line  of  industrial  and  commercial  enterprise  he  con- 
tinued his  active  and  successful  association  until  his  death,  and  his 
character  and  achievement  marked  him  as  one  of  the  world's  worthy 
and  productive  workers,  no  shadow  resting  upon  his  record  as  a 
man,  a  citizen  and  friend,  for  he  was  signally  faithful  in  his  steward- 
ship and  guided  his  course  upon  a  high  plane  of  integrity  and  honor. 
His  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  Republican  party.  His 
widow,  whose  maiden  name  was  Efifie  M.  Hamilton,  is  a  daughter 
of  the  late  Robert  Hamilton,  of  Wellington,  Illinois,  Glenn  H.  being 
the  only  child  of  this  union  and  proving  an  able  successor  to  his 
father,  both  as  a  business  man  and  as  a  liberal  and  progressive 
citizen.  Glenn  H.  Prillaman  was  born  at  Wellington,  Illinois,  March 
15,  1886,  and  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  included  the 
discipline  of  the  high  school.  As  a  youth  he  became  associated  with 
his  father  in  the  grain  business  and  since  the  death  of  his  honored 
sire  he  is  proving  unequivocally  successful  in  the  independent  con- 
ducting of  the  enterprise  in  which  the  two  were  long  and  harmoni- 
ously allied.  He  has  many  friends  among  the  representative  mem- 
bers of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  and  avails  himself  fully  of  the 
privileges  of  this  greatest  of  all  organizations  of  its  kind.  His 
political  support  is  given  to  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party,  and 
he  was  elected  and  served  as  Mayor  of  Rossville,  1909.  He  is  affili- 
ated with  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  the  Benevolent  &  Protective 
Order  of  Elks,  and  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  in  the  Christian 
church.  In  1909  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Glenn  H.  Prillaman 
to  Miss  Alma  M.  Layton,  daughter  of  C.  G.  Layton,  of  Potomac, 
Illinois,  and  the  two  children  of  this  union  are  Don  L.  and  Jay  R. 
John  Prindiville. — One  of  the  most  interesting  personalities  that 
ever  trod  the  floor  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  was  John  Prindi- 
ville. affectionately  designated  "Captain  John"  by  the  entire  mem- 
bership roster.  Brave,  adventurous,  merry,  witty,  sane,  with  the 
simplicity  of  the  heart  of  a  child  and  the  searching  vision  and  instant 
decision  of  a  man  whose  brain  was  as  trained  and  alert  for  emer- 
gency as  his  lithe,  athletic  body.  He  was  a  proud  boast  of  the  Com- 
merce Association  from  the  early  days  of  his  active  stirring  fights 
with  the  lake,  and  the  exigencies  of  the  growing  town,  to  his  later 
victories  of  pleasure  and  peace.  One  of  the  charter  organizers  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  and  a  resident  of  Chicago  from  its  incorporation 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  261 

as  a  city,  John  Prindiville  was  always  a  part  of  the  vital  life  of  the 
town,  typifying  its  spirit,  molding  its  form,  shaping  its  industry. 
While  not  a  native  Chicagoan,  he  came  to  it  a  young  boy,  in  its 
pioneer  days.  He  lived  its  history  from  his  early  play-time  with  the 
Indians,  through  the  struggles  of  expansion  and  construction  to 
thrilling  participation  in  the  conflagration  which  wiped  out  in  a 
night  the  results  of  its  energy,  to  the  rebuilding,  the  vigor,  the 
growth,  of  the  newer  Chicago.  The  city  and  the  lake  were  always  in- 
exhaustible sources  of  interest  to  him.  His  leisure  during  the  later 
years  of  his  full  life  was  passed  in  patrolling  the  shore  of  the  lake 
with  tense  interest  in  its  commerce  and  shore  line,  and  in  driving 
around  the  confines  of  the  spreading  metropolis  with  pride  in  its 
might  and  invincible  belief  in  the  power  of  its  future.  John  Prindi- 
ville was  a  mere  boy  when  he  was  named  master  of  one  of  the  first 
ships  sailing  from  Chicago,  the  youngest  master  on  the  great  lakes. 
His  career  as  a  mariner  was  a  long  series  of  daring,  fighting  adven- 
ture. Loving  danger  rather  than  avoiding  it,  he  carried  sail  till  his 
vessel  lay  with  her  side  in  the  foam  and  her  masts  groaned  heavily 
under  the  weight  of  the  bellying  shrouds  and  slapping  ropes.  The 
young  commander  was  always  the  first  man  out  and  the  first  home. 
With  the  great  sense  of  responsibility  which  was  so  marked  a  char- 
acteristic of  his  generous,  loyal  character,  his  ship-owner's  interests 
were  his  own.  He  enjoyed  the  race,  the  fight,  the  excitement  of 
beating  other  ships  to  port  with  his  cargo,  but  his  men  and  his 
freight  were  his  first  cares,  and  he  never  lost  either.  Many  a  time 
from  boyhood  up  the  adventurous  personality  was  close  to  death, 
but  he  saved  others  before  he  thought  of  himself,  and  his  vision 
and  bravery  carried  him  through.  After  the  conclusion  of  his  active 
career  of  a  sailing  mariner,  at  the  head  of  a  business  which  owned  a 
fleet  of  tugs  and  ships  of  his  own,  men  and  cargoes  were  still  his  first 
responsibility  and  at  the  first  warning  of  distress  or  wreck  he  was 
out  on  the  deck  of  a  tug  to  the  rescue,  in  waves  which  kept  other 
boats  in  the  river,  with  a  dauntless  direction  and  daring  which  saved 
men  and  ships,  in  victorious  wrestle  with  death.  The  story  of 
Captain  Prindiville's  adventures  on  the  lakes  reads  like  fairy  tales 
of  the  sea.  At  one  time  he  touched  at  Beaver  Island,  in  Lake  Mich- 
igan, just  in  time  to  rescue  Strang,  the  Mormon  leader,  from  an 
infuriated  mob  which  had  chased  him  down  to  the  shore.  Quick 
as  lightning  he  sized  the  situation,  pushed  him  into  a  hogshead, 
which  stood  on  the  landing,  and  rolled  him  fearlessly  up  the  gang- 
way of  his  vessel,  landing  him  in  safety  at  Mackinac.  Another  time, 
in  one  of  his  tugs,  he  saved  the  crews  of  four  ships  stranded  in  a 
gale  off  the  south  shore  of  the  city,  the  water  engulfing  his  tug  with 
each  move  of  his  engine.  Maneuvering  with  clear,  unerring  judg- 
ment to  get  the  better  of  the  onslaughts  of  water  and  storm,  in 
unflinching  command  himself,  the  owner  of  the  ship  put  her  nose 
into  the  trough  of  the  waves  and  picked  up  the  struggling  men  one 


262  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

by  one  till  all  were  rescued,  and  he  could  turn  back  to  the  breakwater 
in  perilous  voyage  home  with  overweighted  decks.  The  citizens  of 
Chicago  had  gathered  to  proclaim  the  arrival  of  the  men  and  to  offer 
the  intrepid  owner  of  the  tug  a  purse  of  gold,  which  had  been  hastily 
collected,  a  recognition  of  service  which  was  quietly  passed  to  the 
suffering  men  and  their  families,  while  he  rapidly  escaped  from 
the  enthusiasm  of  the  throng.  Later  with  the  same  modest  distaste 
for  outer  reward,  he  refused  the  efforts  of  other  citizens  for  medals 
from  the  government  in  recognition  of  the  long  lists  of  saved  men, 
particularly  those  rescued  under  heroic  trial  from  the  ill-fated  Lady 
Elgin.  He  had  satisfied  himself,  the  plaudits  of  the  throng  were  un- 
necessary. At  the  time  of  the  Chicago  fire  he  kept  hundreds  of 
people  from  being  burned  to  death  by  refusing  to  allow  the  bridge- 
tender  at  Kinzie  street  to  open  the  bridge  for  a  passing  freighter 
already  on  fire.  The  wooden  bridge  was  thronged  with  men  and 
women  fleeing  to  the  West  Side  from  the  devastating  flames  of  the 
North  and  South.  When  the  crowd  had  crossed  Prindiville  gave 
the  signal  for  the  turn  of  the  bridge  and  the  vessel  passing  through 
set  fire  to  the  structure  an  instant  afterward.  John  Prindiville  was 
one  of  the  incorporators  of  the  Chicago  Yacht  Club  and  was  its  first 
Commodore.  He  was  a  most  enthusiastic  lover  of  the  sport  after 
the  more  strenuous  days  of  his  sailing  were  at  an  end.  He  won  with 
his  "Frolic"  the  first  international  race  sailed  in  Chicago,  defeating 
the  Canadian  sloop  "Ina"  in  two  races  out  of  three.  It  was  not  only 
sailing  which  drew  him  in  delight.  He  loved  horses  and  dogs,  games 
and  people.  He  loved  life  and  met  it  in  generous,  joyous  embrace, 
and  life  rewarded  him  with  the  love  of  people  beyond  what  passes 
to  the  share  of  most  men.  He  was  generous  in  thought  and  deed  to 
rich  and  poor,  and  was  always  the  arbiter  between  owner  and  men, 
averting  dissatisfaction  and  strikes  by  the  justice  and  love  he  dis- 
played for  all.  The  "trimmers,"  as  the  men  who  loaded  ships  in 
earlier  days  were  called,  always  knew  they  had  a  firm  advocate  in 
"Captain  John" — their  side  of  dispute  was  always  left  to  him.  Mr. 
Prindiville  founded  the  marine  insurance  firm  which  bears  his  name, 
John  Prindiville  &  Sons,  which  still  takes  a  vital  share  in  the  activi- 
ties of  the  Board  of  Trade. 

Robert  Pringle. — It  may  consistently  be  said  that  the  personal 
popularity  of  Robert  Pringle  among  the  members  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  is  coextensive  with  the  scope  of  his  operations  as  a  broker 
in  stocks,  grain  and  provisions,  and  few  members  of  the  Board  have 
controlled  a  greater  volume  of  business  along  these  lines  than  this 
liberal,  progressive  and  steadfast  representative,  who  has  main- 
tained his  home  in  Chicago  for  more  than  thirty  years  and  who  has 
marked  these  years  with  large  and  worthy  achievement  as  well  as 
by  abiding  human  sympathy  and  toleration  that  have  found  expres- 
sion in  helpfulness  and  definite  kindliness  in  thought  and  action. 
It  is  much  to  have  such  a  personal  estimate  placed  upon  a  man  by 


f 
It 


1 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  263 

his  fellow  men  as  has  been  drawn  forth  in  connection  with  obtaining 
from  objective  sources  the  data  from  which  this  all  too  brief  personal 
review  is  prepared.  Robert  Pringle  was  born  at  Seaforth,  Province 
of  Ontario,  Canada,  on  the  6th  of  February,  1866,  and  is  a  son  of 
James  and  Mary  (Walker)  Pringle.  In  his  boyhood  and  youth  he 
made  good  use  of  the  advantages  afforded  him  in  the  public  schools 
and  during  virtually  his  entire  business  career  Chicago  has  been  the 
stage  of  his  activities,  his  close  application,  mature  judgment  and 
well-directed  activities  having  brought  to  him  a  large  measure  of 
substantial  success.  In  this  city  he  initiated  his  association  with  the 
commission  business  in  grain  and  provisions  by  assuming,  in  1883, 
the  dual  post  of  bookkeeper  and  settling  clerk  for  the  firm  of  E.  H. 
Sedgwick  &  Co.,  and  from  1886  to  1889  he  was  with  Boyd,  Paxton 
&  Boyd.  He  proved  himself  admirably  fortified  when  he  engaged 
in  independent  activities  as  a  broker  in  stocks,  grain  and  provisions, 
of  which  important  lines  of  enterprise  he  has  since  continued  a 
successful  and  influential  representative  in  the  great  metropolis  at 
the  foot  of  Lake  Michigan.  In  1904  he  became  executive  head  of 
the  firm  of  Pringle,  Fitch  &  Rankin,  and  this  alliance  continued 
until  1909,  since  which  time  he  has  conducted  an  individual  business 
and  given  his  attention  to  his  large  and  important  personal  interests 
■of  a  commercial,  industrial  and  capitalistic  order.  Mr.  Pringle  has 
never  sought  the  great  white  light  of  publicity,  but  has  signalized 
his  civic  loyalty  with  the  same  characteristic  effectiveness  and  mod- 
esty that  have  marked  his  business  career.  His  political  allegiance 
is  given  to  the  Republican  party,  his  religious  faith  is  that  of  the 
Presbyterian  church,  and  he  is  an  appreciative  and  popular  member 
of  such  representative  Chicago  organizations  as  the  Chicago  Club, 
the  Chicago  Athletic  Club,  the  Midlothian  Club,  the  Glen  View, 
Exmoor  and  South  Shore  Country  Clubs,  and  the  Chicago  Yacht 
Club. 

William  O.  Pringle. — The  late  William  Ogilvie  Pringle  became 
a  successful  and  honored  representative  of  the  brokerage  and  general 
^rain  commission  business  in  Chicago  and  was  one  of  the  sterling 
and  valued  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  from  January  7,  1893, 
until  his  death,  which  occurred  December  26,  1915,  at  which  time 
he  was  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Pringle  &  Wing.  He  was  a  brother 
of  Robert  Pringle,  who  likewise  has  been  active  in  the  operations  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  and  of  whom  individual  mention  is  made  on 
other  pages  of  this  volume.  William  O.  Pringle  was  born  at  Sea- 
forth, Province  of  Ontario,  Canada,  on  the  22d  of  June,  1871,  a  son 
of  James  and  Mary  Jane  (Walker)  Pringle.  He  acquired  his  youth- 
ful education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  Province  and  those 
of  the  city  of  Chicago,  and  virtually  his  entire  active  career  was 
marked  by  his  close  and  effective  association  with  the  grain  commis- 
sion trade  in  the  great  western  metropolis,  where  his  ability  and  his 
tipright  and  genial  personality  gained  to  him  a  host  of  loyal  and 


264  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

valued  friends.  He  served  three  years  as  a  member  of  the  Illinois 
National  Guard,  and  in  the  Masonic  fraternity  he  received  the  chiv- 
alric  degrees,  his  affiliation  being  with  Chevalier  Commandery  of 
Knights  Templar.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Belmont  Golf  Club 
and  was  an  earnest  communicant  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
church,  as  is  also  his  widow,  who  still  maintains  her  home  in 
Chicago.  On  the  20th  of  April,  1893,  was  solemnized  the  marriage 
of  Mr.  Pringle  to  Miss  Alice  Rust  Judson,  who  survives  him,  as  do 
also  their  two  children — Robert  Judson  and  Edward  Ogilvie. 

Charles  A.  Rache. — The  city  of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  gives 
to  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  a  valued  representative  in  the  person 
of  Mr.  Rache,  who  became  a  member  of  this  important  commercial 
organization  in  1915,  and  who  is  one  of  the  extensive  and  influential 
exponents  of  the  grain  and  feed  business  in  Boston,  where  he  is  a 
prominent  member  also  of  the  Boston  Chamber  of  Commerce,  his 
offices  being  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  Building.  He  is  likewise 
an  active  member  of  the  Grain  Dealers'  National  Association  and  in 
his  independent  operations  controls  a  large  and  successful  grain 
brokerage  business.  Mr.  Rache  was  born  in  Boston  on  the  18th  of 
August,  1861,  and  is  a  scion  of  staunch  New  England  stock,  the 
Rache  family  having  been  founded  in  America  in  the  colonial  period 
of  our  national  history.  Alexander  and  Caroline  (Baer)  Rache,  the 
parents  of  the  subject  of  this  review,  continued  their  residence  in 
Boston  until  the  time  of  their  death.  Charles  A.  Rache  is  indebted 
to  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  for  his  early  educational 
training,  which  was  supplemented  by  his  attending  a  well-ordered 
private  school.  As  a  youth  he  became  identified  with  business 
affairs  in  Boston,  and  since  1896  he  has  here  been  engaged  success- 
fully in  the  grain  commmission  business,  of  which  he  has  become  one 
of  the  prominent  and  influential  exponents  in  Boston.  He  is  em- 
phatically a  broad-gauged  and  progressive  citizen,  taking  loyal  in- 
terest in  all  things  that  tend  to  conserve  the  civic  and  material  well- 
being  of  his  home  city,  and  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the 
Republican  party. 

John  J.  Rammacher. — It  has  proved  a  specially  pleasing  phase 
of  the  compiling  of  this  history  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago  to  give  specific  recognition  to  the  non-resident  members 
of  the  body  who  are  prominent  and  influential  figures  in  connection 
with  the  grain  trade  in  other  cities  of  the  Union.  To  such  considera- 
tion John  J.  Rammacher  is  definitely  entitled.  He  is  Vice-President 
and  Treasurer  of  the  Eastern  Grain,  Mill  &  Elevator  Corporation, 
which  maintains  its  office  headquarters  in  the  Marine  National 
Bank  Building  in  the  city  of  Buffalo,  New  York,  and  which  exercises 
large  and  important  functions  in  connection  with  the  direct  handling 
and  commercial  aspects  of  the  grain  business  in  the  Empire  State, 
Nisbet  Grammer  being  President  of  the  Corporation  and  G.  J.  Gram- 
mer  its  Secretary.    Mr.  Rammacher  was  born  and  reared  in  the  city 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  265 

of  Buffalo,  where  he  availed  himself  duly  of  the  advantages  of  the 
public  schools  and  where  by  his  ability  and  energy  he  has  gained 
secure  vantage  ground  as  one  of  the  representative  business  men  of 
the  younger  generation.  In  1897,  when  a  youth  of  seventeen  years, 
he  became  associated  with  the  grain  business  of  the  firm  of  which 
S.  W.  Yentis  was  the  executive  head,  and  with  this  concern  he  con- 
tinued until  1900.  For  the  ensuing  decade  he  was  connected  with 
another  of  the  important  grain  firms  of  his  native  city  and  since  1910 
he  has  been  Vice-President  and  Treasurer  of  the  Eastern  Grain,  Mill 
&  Elevator  Corporation,  as  well  as  a  member  of  the  Chicago  Board 
of  Trade  and  the  Buffalo  Corn  Exchange.  Mr.  Rammacher  was 
born  June  5,  1880,  and  is  one  of  the  five  living  children  in  a  family 
of  eight  born  to  William  and  Helen  (Hunnis)  Rammacher,  his 
father  having  died  in  1897,  and  he  having  depended  on  his  own 
exertions  and  resources  in  making  his  way  forward  to  the  goal  of 
definite  success  in  connection  with  business  affairs  of  broad  scope. 
His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  Republican  party  and  his 
religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Catholic  church.  He  is  a  popular  and 
appreciative  member  of  the  Benevolent  &  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 
The  maiden  name  of  his  wife  was  Emma  Krites  and  she  is  a  daughter 
of  Charles  Krites,  a  well-known  citizen  of  Buffalo.  The  one  child 
of  this  union  is  a  little  daughter,  Ruth. 

Blanchard  Randall. — The  Chicago  Board  of  Trade  is  favored  in 
claiming  as  one  of  its  non-resident  members  an  influential  Baltimore 
citizen  and  man  of  affairs  whose  name  initiates  this  paragraph.  Mr. 
Randall  became  identified  with  the  grain  business  in  Baltimore, 
Maryland,  about  the  time  of  attaining  to  his  legal  majority.  It  was 
in  the  year  1878  that  he  became  an  employe  in  the  office  of  the  firm 
of  Gill  &  Fisher,  and  his  efficiency  and  sterling  character  won  to  him 
the  confidence  and  high  esteem  of  his  employers,  Gill  &  Fisher, 
who  admitted  him  to  partnership  in  their  business  in  1883.  There  is 
much  of  significance  in  the  statement  that  he  is  now  the  head  of 
this  old  and  important  firm  and  that  his  appreciative  loyalty  has 
caused  him  to  retain  unchanged  the  original  title,  though  both  Mr. 
Gill  and  Mr.  Fisher  are  now  deceased.  The  other  constituent  mem- 
bers of  the  firm  in  1917  are  George  Somerville  Jackson,  Eugene 
Blackford,  and  Joseph  G.  Reynolds.  Mr.  Randall  has  held  member- 
ship in  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  for  many  years, 
and  is  also  his  firm's  representative  in  the  Baltimore  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  Mr.  Blackford  being  the  exponent  of  its  interests  on  the 
Philadelphia  Bourse,  and  the  firm  as  an  organization  being  similarly 
identified  with  the  New  York  Produce  Exchange.  Mr.  Randall  has 
shown  no  static  intervals  in  his  singularly  long  and  successful  busi- 
ness career,  progress  has  been  his  watchword,  integrity  of  purpose 
his  guide,  and  he  has  achieved  a  place  of  prominence  and  influence  in 
the  business  world,  with  capitalistic  and  executive  interests  of  broad 
scope  and  of  varied  order.    He  takes  merited  pride  and  satisfaction 


266  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

in  being  at  the  head  of  a  firm  that  has  maintained  a  consecutive  and 
honorable  history  covering  a  period  of  nearly  sixty  years,  the  firm  of 
Gill  &  Fisher  having  been  formed  in  1869  and  its  name  having  stood 
as  a  power  in  the  Baltimore  field  of  commerce  during  the  long  inter- 
vening years.  Blanchard  Randall  was  bOrn  in  the  city  of  Annapolis, 
Maryland,  on  the  12th  of  November,  1856,  and  is  a  son  of  Alexander 
and  Elizabeth  (Philpot)  Randall.  Mr.  Randall  received  in  his  youth 
excellent  educational  advantages,  including  those  of  St.  James 
College,  in  Annapolis,  an  institution  in  which  he  was  graduated  as  a 
member  of  the  class  of  1876  and  from  which  he  received  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  After  leaving  college  he  was  for  a  time  identi- 
fied with  mercantile  pursuits  in  Baltimore,  but  in  1878  he  entered 
the  employ  of  Gill  &  Fisher.  In  addition  to  being  the  dominating 
figure  in  this  important  commercial  concern  he  is  Vice-President 
of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Baltimore,  a  Director  of  the  Baltimore 
Safe  Deposit  &  Trust  Company,  a  life  insurance  company  of  Phila- 
delphia, and  the  Baltimore  &  Washington  Railroad  Company.  As 
one  of  the  substantial  and  representative  citizens  of  Baltimore  he  has 
entered  fully  into  all  that  touches  the  better  interests  of  the  com- 
munity, and  it  is  specially  to  be  noted  that  he  is  a  trustee  of  Johns 
Hopkins  University  and  also  Johns  Hopkins  Hospital,  two  of  the 
great  institutions  that  add  to  the  importance  of  Baltimore  as  one 
of  the  metropolitan  centers  of  the  United  States.  He  is  a  Trustee 
also  of  the  University  of  Maryland,  and  as  an  earnest,  devoted  and 
liberal  churchman  he  has  the  distinction  of  being  Treasurer  of  the 
Maryland  Diocese  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church,  his  local 
church  affiliation  being  with  the  parish  church  at  Catonsville,  Mary- 
land, in  which  beautiful  little  suburban  city  he  maintains  his  home. 
At  Catonsville  he  is  a  member  of  the  South  River  Country  Club, 
in  the  city  of  New  York  he  is  enrolled  as  a  member  of  the  Grolier 
Club,  and,  as  a  scion  of  a  family  that  gave  patriot  officers  and  sol- 
diers to  the  Continental  forces  in  the  War  of  the  Revolution  he  is 
affiliated  with  the  Society  of  the  Cincinnati  and  the  Society  of  the 
Sons  of  the  American  Revolution.  A  man  of  broad  and  well-fortified 
opinions,  Mr.  Randall  is  aligned  as  a  staunch  advocate  of  the  prin- 
ciples of  the  Republican  party. 

Henry  Rang,  Jr. — It  is  altogether  too  frequent  in  America  that 
the  son  does  not  follow  in  the  footsteps  of  the  father,  and  that  the 
business  which  the  latter  built  up  by  energy  and  foresight  and  integ- 
rity is  allowed  to  fall  into  decline  when  the  younger  generation 
comes  into  control.  Such  has  not  been  the  case  with  Henry  Rang 
and  his  son,  Henry  Rang,  Jr.,  for  their  joint  career  as  commission 
men  and  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  has 
continued  through  many  years  and  has  brought  to  them  widespread 
reputation  for  high  standards  of  commercial  conduct  and  the  most 
conscientious  regard  for  the  interests  of  their  many  clients ;  while 
the  son  has  widened  and  extended  the  business  until  it  is  now  one 


ai 


;j« 


itiit 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  267 

of  the  best  and  most  favorably  known  of  the  many  firms  operating  in 
the  world's  greatest  market  place.  Henry  Rang,  who  was  well 
known  in  Chicago  business  circles  for  so  many  years,  was  born  in 
the  beautiful  cathedral  city  of  Strassburg  on  the  Rhine,  in  the 
Province  of  Alsace-Lorraine,  on  June  10,  1830,  when  that  fair  country 
was  still  under  the  tri-color  of  France.  In  his  youth  he  took  full 
advantage  of  the  thorough  educational  advantages  for  which  the 
Old  World  is  noted,  but  following  the  stormy  days  of  revolution 
he  came,  as  did  many  thousand  others,  to  the  land  of  greater  oppor- 
tunities and  wider  liberties  and,  at  the  age  of  nineteen,  he  entered 
the  great  melting  pot  of  Americanism  and  he  soon  became  one  of 
the  strong  and  helpful,  loyal  and  patriotic  sons  of  the  United  States. 
His  natural  abilities  and  his  excellent  education  enabled  him  at  once 
to  enter  commercial  life  as  a  customs  broker  in  the  city  of  New  York 
and  here  he  remained  until  1856,  when  he  again  responded  to  the  call 
of  the  West  and  removed  to  Dunton,  now  Arlington  Heights,  Illi- 
nois, where  for  a  brief  time  he  conducted  a  general  merchandise 
store.  Even  at  that  time  Chicago  was  attracting  attention  as  the 
coming  metropolis  of  the  central  United  States  and  the  young  busi- 
ness man  decided  to  cast  his  lot  with  the  rapidly-growing  city.  His 
business  career  in  Chicago  thus  antedates  the  great  Civil  War  by 
several  years,  making  the  name  one  of  the  oldest  and  best  known  in 
the  commercial  circles  of  the  city.  His  first  Chicago  venture  was  as 
a  partner  in  the  commission  business  in  the  firm  of  Lichtenberger  & 
Rang  on  the  Haymarket,  and  here  his  steady  application  to  business, 
his  honesty  and  his  ability  brought  added  success  from  year  to  year. 
Following  the  current  of  business  activity,  the  firm  later  re-located 
on  South  Water  Street,  where  they  continued  in  the  grain  and 
produce  business,  later  removing  to  the  Brother  Jonathan  Building 
and  devoting  their  entire  attention  to  the  grain  business.  It  was  here 
in  after  years  that  he  was  joined  in  business  by  his  son.  Thus  it  was 
that  his  years  of  toil  were  not  only  crowned  with  business  success, 
but  he  was  able  to  leave  the  cares  of  life  knowing  that  his  mantle 
would  fall  upon  the  shoulders  of  a  son  ready  and  able  to  maintain 
the  high  reputation  which  he  had  so  rightly  earned.  Henry  Rang, 
Jr.,  son  of  Henry  and  Elenore  Rang,  was  born  in  Chicago,  on  May 
16,  1873,  and  all  his  life  has  been  spent  as  a  resident  of  this  city.  His 
father  had  the  Old  World  faith  in  the  benefits  of  a  thorough  educa- 
tion and  the  son  was  given  opportunity  to  pursue  the  complete 
course  of  study  of  the  Chicago  schools,  graduating  from  the  high 
school  of  the  city  and  adding  to  this  the  excellent  training  of  a  busi- 
ness college  course.  It  was,  perhaps,  natural  that  the  young  man 
should  be  interested  along  the  lines  of  his  father's  business,  but  he 
gained  his  first  experience,  after  school  days  were  done,  with  the  old 
established  firm  of  Rosenbaum  Bros.  After  a  year  in  this  employ  he 
felt  able  to  assume  larger  responsibilities  and  accordingly  he  entered 
business,  in  1894,  with  his  father  under  the  firm  name  of  Henry  Rang 


268  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

&  Son.  It  was  on  his  twenty-first  birthday,  May  16,  1894,  that  he 
became  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  and, 
as  it  has  always  been  a  rule  of  the  great  grain  Exchange  that  mem- 
bers must  be  of  "legal"  age,  it  is  perfectly  safe  to  say  that  no  younger 
man  was  ever  admitted  to  the  large  responsibilities  which  member- 
ship in  the  Board  entails.  This  auspicious  opening  of  his  business 
life  was  but  an  index  of  the  future,  for  by  continued  industry,  aided 
by  a  keen  intellect  and  absolute  integrity,  he  has  been  able  not  only 
to  maintain  but  to  increase  the  general  grain  commission  business 
for  which  his  father  laid  such  broad  and  strong  foundations.  In 
1913,  following  the  demands  of  growing  business,  the  concern  be- 
came incorporated  under  the  laws  of  the  State  of  Illinois,  and  with 
the  title  of  Henry  Rang  &  Co.  with  its  Chicago  offices  in  the  Webster 
Building,  opposite  the  Board  of  Trade  Building,  and  branch  offices 
in  Milwaukee,  the  large  and  constantly  busy  clerical  forces  in  both 
offices  attesting  the  magnitude  of  the  firm's  affairs.  Henry  Rang,  Jr., 
is  President  and  Treasurer  of  the  company  and  gives  to  all  its  affairs 
his  personal  attention  and  the  benefit  of  his  long  experience.  The 
clientage  of  the  concern  extends  over  a  wide  territory  and  its  annual 
business  runs  into  large  figures,  showing  the  esteem  in  which  it  is 
held  by  all  with  whom  it  has  transactions.  As  members  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  both  Henry  Rang  and  Henry  Rang,  Jr.,  have  been 
true  to  the  best  traditions  of  the  Association  and  in  a  quiet,  but  no 
less  effective,  manner  they  have  contributed  to  the  maintenance  of 
the  high  commercial  standard  which  has  made  the  Board  of  Trade 
without  a  peer  throughout  the  world.  When  he  can  lay  business 
cares  aside  Mr.  Rang  is  a  most  companionable  man,  his  love  of  out- 
door sports  being  evidenced  by  his  membership  in  the  Chicago 
Athletic  Association  and  the  Belmont  Golf  Club,  while  he  is  most 
happy  in  his  home  life,  his  marriage  to  Miss  Violet  H.  Crow  having 
been  solemnized  on  June  2,  1909. 

Charles  L.  Raymond. — In  the  scope  and  importance  of  the  com- 
mission trade  which  he  has  long  controlled,  and  in  his  prominence 
and  influence  as  a  representative  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he 
has  been  a  member  for  more  than  half  a  century,  Charles  Lewis 
Raymond  merits  distinctive  consideration  in  this  history.  Mr.  Ray- 
mand  has  made  the  passing  years  count  in  large  and  worthy  accom- 
plishment on  his  part  and  is  the  executive  head  of  the  old  and  im- 
portant commission  firm  of  C.  L.  Raymond  &  Co.  He  was  born  in 
the  city  of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  on  the  6th  of  June,  1840,  and  is 
a  son  of  Zebina  L.  and  Rhoda  C.  (Hildreth)  Raymond,  representa- 
tives of  colonial  families  of  New  England.  In  his  youth  Mr.  Ray- 
mond received  excellent  educational  advantages,  and  in  1858,  at  the 
age  of  eighteen  years,  he  began  his  business  career  as  a  clerk  in  the 
crockery  store  of  Otis  Norcross  &  Co.,  of  Boston.  Later  he  became 
associated  in  the  same  city  with  the  firm  of  Potter  &  Demmon,  deal- 
ers in  provisions,  and  this  connection  was  continued  until  1861,  when 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  269 

he  came  to  Chicago  and  identified  himself  with  one  of  the  pioneer 
concerns  in  the  pork  packing  business.  In  1864,  he  became  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  during  the  long  intervening  years  he 
has  continued  as  a  vigorous  and  successful  exponent  of  the  commis- 
sion business  in  grain  and  provisions,  besides  which  he  has  expanded 
his  operations  to  include  the  handling  of  stocks,  in  which  connection 
he  holds  membership  on  the  Chicago  Stock  Exchange.  He  now 
holds  rank  as  one  of  the  veteran  and  honored  members  of  the  Chi- 
cago Board  of  Trade,  and  during  his  protracted  association  with  its 
activities  he  has  been  a  supporter  of  its  fine  civic  and  commercial 
policies  and  ideals.  Mr.  Raymond  is  a  most  loyal  and  public-spirited 
citizen,  and  while  he  has  never  sought  the  honors  or  emoluments  of 
political  office  he  is  aligned  as  a  staunch  supporter  of  the  cause  of 
the  Republican  party.  He  is  President  of  the  Board  of  Trustees 
of  the  Chicago  Old  People's  Home,  and  as  an  earnest  communicant 
of  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church  he  has  been  zealous  in  support  of 
the  various  departments  of  its  work  and  is  President  of  the  Board 
of  Trustees  of  the  Society  for  the  Relief  of  Widows  and  Orphans  of 
Deceased  Episcopal  Clergymen  of  Chicago.  He  is  identified  with 
various  social  organizations  of  representative  character,  including 
the  Chicago  Club,  the  Union  League  Club,  the  Twentieth  Century 
Club,  the  Onwentsia  Club,  and  the  Homewood  Country  Club.  That 
he  is  a  devotee  of  sports  afield  and  afloat  is  indicated  further  by  his 
membership  in  the  Beebe  Lake  Duck  Island  Club,  the  Coleman  Lake 
Fishing  Club,  and  the  Tolleston  Gun  Club.  At  Greenfield,  Massa- 
chusetts, on  the  1st  of  September,  1869,  was  solemnized  the  marriage 
of  Mr.  Raymond  to  Miss  Florence  Merriam,  and  they  have  six 
children — Edward  F.,  Charles  M.,  Abbie  M.,  John  D.,  Lucy  E.  and 
Ralph. 

Samuel  M.  Raymond. — It  is  incidentally  gratifying  to  note  that 
in  connection  with  the  great  and  far-reaching  operations  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  a  popular  representative  of  the  news- 
paper fraternity  has  effectively  brought  to  bear  the  mystic  influence 
of  the  "fourth  estate"  and  has  developed  a  most  valuable  service  in 
conducting  the  news  bureau  which  bears  his  name.  It  is  through 
the  medium  of  the  Raymond  News  Bureau  that  authentic  informa- 
tion concerning  the  afifairs  and  varied  activities  of  the  Board  of  Trade 
are  properly  presented  to  the  public,  and  this  admirable  service  has 
been  developed  and  perfected  by  the  popular  member  whose  name 
initiates  this  paragraph.  Mr.  Raymond's  domain  of  activity  as  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  in  which  he  has  held  membership 
since  February  7,  1896,  has  been  that  of  collecting  and  shaping  for 
publication  thoroughly  reliable  commercial  news  pertinent  to  the 
functions  and  operations  of  the  great  commercial  body  with  which 
he  is  identified  as  a  valued  and  popular  member,  and  thus  he  is 
specially  entitled  to  consideration  in  this  history  of  the  Board  of 
Trade.     Samuel  M.  Raymond  was  born  in  New  York  City,  on  the 


270  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

26th  of  January,  1872,  and  was  about  one  year  of  age  when  his 
parents,  John  and  Helen  Raymond,  established  the  family  home  in 
Chicago.  He  made  good  use  of  the  advantages  afforded  in  the  public 
schools  of  Chicago  and  as  a  youth  entered  upon  that  discipline  which 
may  well  be  considered  the  equivalent  of  a  liberal  education — he 
became  identified  with  newspaper  work,  and  in  a  reportorial  capacity 
was  associated  in  turn  with  the  Chicago  Daily  News,  the  Chicago 
Times-Herald,  the  Chicago  Record-Herald  and  the  Chicago  Even- 
ing Mail.  It  was  while  thus  engaged  that  he  gained  his  early  expe- 
rience in  connection  with  the  gathering  of  news  concerning  the 
Board  of  Trade,  and  in  1894  he  established  in  connection  with  the 
Board  the  Raymond  News  Bureau,  which  he  has  made  a  most  reli- 
able medium  of  purveying  news  relevant  to  the  operations  of  the 
Board  and  also  of  general  commercial  interest.  He  has  brought  the 
service  up  to  high  standard  and  his  bureau  receives  the  loyal  appre- 
ciation and  support  of  the  members  of  the  most  important  commer- 
cial organization  of  its  kind  in  the  world — the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
City  of  Chicago.  Mr.  Raymond  has  had  no  desire  to  enter  the  arena 
of  practical  politics,  has  never  sought  or  held  public  office,  but  gives 
a  loyal  allegiance  to  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party.  He  is  promi- 
nently affiliated  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  of  which  he  is  Past 
Chancellor  Commander,  and  in  the  time-honored  Masonic  fraternity 
his  ancient  craft  affiliation  is  with  Kilwinning  Lodge,  No.  311,  An- 
cient Free&  Accepted  Masons.  In  the  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite 
of  Masonry  he  has  received  the  thirty-second  degree,  as  a  member  of 
Oriental  Consistory,  and  he  is  affiliated  also  with  Medinah  Temple 
of  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine. 
He  resides  at  Oak  Park,  and  in  that  suburban  district  of  Chicago  he 
is  a  member  of  the  Oak  Park  Lodge  of  the  Benevolent  &  Protective 
Order  of  Elks.  He  is  an  active  and  influential  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  Craftsmen's  Club,  of  which  he  has  served  as  President, 
and  also  of  the  Board  of  Trade  Fellowship  Club.  On  the  28th  of 
May,  1893,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Raymond  to  Miss 
Minnie  Werthan,  and  they  have  two  children — Harry,  who  is 
twenty-two  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  this  writing,  in  1916,  and 
Irene,  who  is  eighteen  years  old. 

Robert  J.  Reid. — As  an  independent  broker  in  the  handling  of 
grain  and  stocks  Mr.  Reid  holds  an  excellent  position  in  operations 
carried  on  in  northern  Illinois,  and  he  is  President  of  the  Reid  Grain 
Company,  which  maintains  offices  at  Ottawa,  LaSalle  County,  and 
Sterling,  Whiteside  County,  his  home  being  maintained  in  the 
former  city.  His  membership  on  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of 
Chicago  dates  from  the  year  1912.  Mr.  Reid  acquired  his  initial 
knowledge  of  the  grain  industry  at  first  hands,  for  he  was  born  and 
reared  under  the  sturdy  discipline  of  a  well-ordered  Illinois  farm,  his 
birth  having  occurred  on  the  homestead  farm  in  this  state,  July  21, 
1863.     He  is  a  son  of  Daniel  R.  and  Sarah  (Cowan)  Reid,  and  his 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  271 

father,  a  Kentuckian  by  birth,  was  long  numbered  among  the  able 
and  successful  exponents  of  farm  industry  in  Illinois,  his  death  hav- 
ing occurred  in  the  year  1906.  While  he  early  began  to  give  prac- 
tical assistance  in  the  work  of  the  home  farm,  Robert  J.  Reid  did  not 
fail  to  make  good  use  of  the  advantages  ofifered'in  the  public  schools, 
and  he  continued  his  father's  valued  coadjutor  in  the  management 
of  the  farm  until  he  identified  himself  with  the  grain  business,  at 
Dwight,  Livingston  County.  There  he  remained  two  years,  and 
in  January,  1916,  he  opened  his  brokerage  office  in  the  city  of  Ottawa, 
as  well  as  a  branch  office  at  Sterling.  He  has  developed  a  substan- 
tial business  along  duly  conservative  lines  and  is  known  as  one  of 
the  vigorous  and  resourceful  representatives  of  the  grain  commission 
trade  in  the  counties  covered  in  his  operations.  In  politics  Mr.  Reid 
is  a  loyal  supporter  of  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party,  and  he  and 
his  wife  are  members  of  the  Congregational  church.  He  is  identi- 
fied with  the  leading  clubs  of  his  home  city,  is  affiliated  with  the 
Ottawa  Blue  Bloods,  and  in  the  Masonic  fraternity  he  is  identified 
with  the  local  lodge  and  chapter  of  the  York  Rite,  with  Ottawa  Com- 
mandery.  No.  10,  Knights  Templars  and  with  Oriental  Consistory  of 
the  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  in  the  city  of  Chicago,  besides 
being  a  member  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  Mr.  Reid  was  married  to 
Miss  May  Newton,  daughter  of  Dr.  J.  W.  Newton,  a  representative 
physician  at  Marseilles,  LaSalle  County,  and  the  one  child  of  this 
union  is  Robert  Newton  Reid. 

William  C.  Renstrom. — Since  1908  Mr.  Renstrom  has  been 
numbered  among  the  active  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  his 
native  city,  but  his  association  with  the  organization  has  extended 
over  a  much  longer  period,  as  he  has  been  connected  with  the  grain 
commission  business  of  the  representative  corporation  of  Rosen- 
baum  Brothers  since  1892,  his  experience  having  covered  the  various 
departments  of  this  line  of  enterprise  and  having  given  him  an  inti- 
mate and  authoritative  knowledge  of  the  business  in  its  direct  and 
collateral  operations.  Further  reference  to  the  activities  and  prece- 
dence of  Rosenbaum  Brothers  is  made  on  other  pages  of  this  work, 
in  the  sketch  of  the  career  of  Edward  L.  Glaser,  President  of  this 
representative  corporation.  William  C.  Renstrom  was  born  in  Chi- 
cago on  the  12th  of  June,  1874,  and  is  a  son  of  William  C.  Renstrom, 
Sr.,  and  Helen  C.  Renstrom.  As  a  boy  and  youth  he  availed  himself 
consistently  of  the  advantages  of  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
city,  and  he  assumed  a  position  in  the  offices  of  Rosenbaum  Brothers 
when  he  was  eighteen  years  of  age,  his  rise  to  a  position  of  re- 
sponsible executive  order  having  been  gained  through  his  close 
application,  fidelity  and  constantly  expanding  knowledge  of  the 
business.  He  is  now  Secretary  of  this  important  corporation  and 
is  doing  well  his  part  in  maintaining  its  high  reputation  on  the  Board 
of  Trade,  in  which  body  the  year  1916  found  him  serving  efficiently 
as  a  member  of  the  Transportation  Committee.     Mr.  Renstrom  is  a 


272  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

member  of  the  Chicago  Traffic  Club,  and  in  the  time-honored 
Masonic  fraternity  he  has  received  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the 
Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  besides  being  also  a  popular  mem- 
ber of  the  Medinah  Temple  of  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  of  the 
Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  In  1899  Mr.  Renstrom  wedded  Miss 
Anna  C  Swanson,  and  their  two  children  are  William  A.  and 
Helen  A. 

George  M.  Reynolds. — It  may  well  be  understood  that  the  Board 
of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago  is  honored  and  favored  in  having 
represented  on  its  list  of  members  a  man  of  whom  the  following  sig- 
nificant estimate  has  been  written :  "The  rise  of  no  other  man  in 
financial  circles  in  the  United  States  has  been  so  rapid  and  assured 
as  that  of  George  McClelland  Reynolds,  President  of  the  Continental 
&  Commercial  National  Bank  of  Chicago.  His  ready  mastery  of 
every  problem,  his  initiative  spirit,  his  grasp  of  details,  his  separation 
of  the  essential  from  the  non-essential,  his  effective  maneuvering  of 
forces  at  his  command,  have  given  him  leadership  among  the  men 
who  are  foremost  representatives  of  the  American  financial  world." 
It  is  not  easy  to  determine  the  full  measure  of  a  man's  capacity  for 
achievement,  but  results  indicate  fully  that  Mr.  Reynolds  has  meas- 
ured up  to  every  demand  and  exigency  in  his  progressive  march  to 
his  present  commanding  position  as  one  of  the  representative  figures 
in  the  domain  of  stupendous  American  finance.  It  is  much  to  have 
risen  from  the  plane  of  small  beginnings  to  secure  status  as  a  domi- 
nating force  in  the  control  and  management  of  great  and  far-reaching 
capitalistic  interests  in  a  great  metropolitan  center,  and  if  success  be 
predicated  from  the  mark  of  definite  accomplishment  in  the  utiliza- 
tion of  one's  individual  powers  and  talents,  then  George  M.  Rey- 
nolds has  "better  bettered  expectation"  in  success-achievement.  It 
is  apart  from  the  functions  of  a  publication  of  this  province  to  enter 
into  manifold  details  concerning  the  careers  of  those  persons  here 
found  individually  represented,  but  so  notable  is  the  reflex  influence 
exercised  by  Mr.  Reynolds  and  the  great  financial  institutions  with 
which  he  is  concerned  as  bearing  upon  the  functions  and  activities  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  of  Chicago,  of  which  he  is  a  member,  that  a 
resume  of  facts,  not  conjectures  or  analysis,  may  properly  be  entered 
in  this  work  as  indicative  of  his  personal  and  administrative  influ- 
ence in  the  great  metropolis  of  the  West.  George  McClelland  Rey- 
nolds was  born  in  the  village  of  Panora,  Guthrie  County,  Iowa,  on 
the  15th  of  January,  1865,  and  is  a  son  of  Elijah  J.  and  Eliza  (Ander- 
son) Reynolds,  who  were  sterling  pioneers  of  the  Hawkeye  State. 
In  his  native  village  Mr.  Reynolds  continued  his  studies  in  the  public 
schools  and  after  his  graduation  in  the  Guthrie  County  High  School, 
in  1879,  he  assumed  a  minor  clerical  position  in  the  Guthrie  County 
National  Bank  at  Panora,  with  which  he  continued  his  connection 
until  1886.  He  passed  the  ensuing  two  years  at  Hastings,  Nebraska, 
and  then  returned  to  Panora  and  resumed  his  association  with  the 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  273 

Guthrie  County  National  Bank,  of  which  he  continued  cashier  and 
manager  until  1893,  when  he  was  advanced  to  the  office  of  cashier  of 
the  Des  Moines  National  Bank,  in  the  capital  city  of  his  native  State. 
Growth  and  advancement  seem  to  have  been  his  natural  preroga- 
tives, and  in  1895  he  was  elected  President  of  this  institution,  an  in- 
cumbency which  he  retained  until  December,  1897,  when  he  came 
to  Chicago  and  assumed  the  office  of  cashier  of  the  Continental 
National  Bank.  In  this  connection  was  initiated  his  period  of  almost 
marvelous  advancement  in  the  financial  world,  and  he  has  proved 
equal  to  the  cumulative  exactions  that  have  marked  his  progress. 
In  May,  1902,  Mr.  Reynolds  became  Vice-President  of  the  institu- 
tion, and  on  the  1st  of  January,  1906,  he  was  elected  its  President,  a 
position  which  he  retained  until  the  consolidation  of  the  Continental 
National  Bank  and  the  Commercial  National  Bank,  on  the  1st  of 
August,  1910.  He  had  been  a  dominating  force  in  bringing  about 
this  amalgamation  of  the  interests  of  two  of  the  great  banking  insti- 
tutions of  Chicago,  and  has  served  from  the  beginning  as  President 
of  the  Continental  &  Commercial  National  Bank,  which  is  one  of 
the  greatest  financial  institutions  in  the  world  and  the  largest  in 
America  outside  of  the  city  of  New  York.  The  splendid  technical 
and  administrative  powers  of  Mr.  Reynolds  are  further  called  into 
play  by  his  holding  also  the  Presidency  of  the  Continental  &  Com- 
mercial Trust  &  Savings  Bank,  and  the  Hibernian  Banking  Associ- 
ation, the  capital  stock  of  each  of  which  is  owned  by  the  stockholders 
of  the  Continental  &  Commercial  National  Bank,  the  combined  cap- 
ital, surplus  and  undivided  profits  of  the  three  institutions  repre- 
senting the  gigantic  amount  of  forty-one  million  dollars,  with  com- 
bined deposits  of  more  than  three  hundred  and  twenty-eight  million 
dollars.  The  status  of  the  Continental  &  Commercial  National  Bank 
is  now  second  in  importance  to  only  one  other  banking  institution 
in  the  United  States.  Mr.  Reynolds  has  the  further  distinction  of 
being  a  Class  "A"  Director  of  the  Federal  Reserve  Bank  of  Chicago, 
since  its  inauguration,  and  in  1916  was  re-elected  to  that  office  for 
a  second  term.  He  is  an  influential  member  of  the  Clearing  House 
Committee  of  the  Chicago  Clearing  House  Association.  He  has 
been  actively  identified  with  the  American  Bankers'  Association,  of 
which  he  was  Treasurer  from  1898  to  1902,  Chairman  of  its  Execu- 
tive Council  in  1906,  Vice-President  in  1907,  and  President  during 
the  following  year.  In  1908,  in  an  advisory  capacity,  he  accom- 
panied the  National  Monetary  Commission  to  Europe,  and  in  the 
following  year  there  came  significant  recognition  of  his  ability  and 
standing  as  a  financier  and  loyal  and  patriotic  citizen,  when  he  was 
tendered  the  portfolio  of  Secretary  of  the  Treasury  in  the  Cabinet 
of  President  Taft,  an  honor  which  he  felt  constrained  to  decline. 
His  continued  interest  in  the  financial  institutions  with  which  he 
was  formerly  identified  in  his  native  State  is  indicated  by  the  fact 
that  he  is  still  a  Director  of  the  Des  Moines  National  Bank  and  the 


274  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

Guthrie  County  National  Bank.  It  is  specially  interesting  to  record 
that  his  only  son,  Earle  H.  Reynolds,  has  likewise  proved  a  resource- 
ful and  valued  factor  in  connection  with  financial  affairs  of  broad 
scope  and  importance  and  is  the  youngest  bank  President  in  Chi- 
cago, as  executive  head  of  the  People's  Trust  &  Savings  Bank,  this 
preferment  proving  a  fitting  testimonial  to  his  ability  and  indicating 
the  careful  discipline  which  he  had  received  under  the  able  direction 
of  his  father.  As  may  naturally  be  inferred,  Mr.  Reynolds  is  a 
stalwart  advocate  of  the  cause  of  the  Republican  party,  and  he  is 
identified  with  the  following  named  and  representative  social  or- 
ganizations of  Chicago :  The  Industrial  Club,  of  which  he  was 
president  in  1907,  and  the  Chicago,  the  Union  League,  the  Chicago 
Athletic,  the  Mid-Day,  the  Bankers,  the  Commercial,  the  Hamilton, 
the  Exmoor  Country,  the  Glen  View,  the  South  Shore  Country,  the 
Midlothian,  the  Colonial,  the  Sleepy  Hollow  Country  and  the  Mid- 
wick  Country  Clubs.  In  his  native  town  of  Panora,  on  the  15th  of 
October,  1884,  was  solemnized  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Reynolds  to 
Miss  Elizabeth  Hay,  and  their  only  child  is  Earle  Hay  Reynolds, 
of  whom  mention  has  been  made  above. 

John  Roberts. — A  valued  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  since 
1895,  Mr.  Roberts  is  one  of  those  vigorous  and  resourceful  men  who 
have  the  very  genius  of  achievement  through  individual  effort  and 
ability,  and  that  he  has  gained  definite  vantage-place  as  one  of  the 
representative  business  men  of  the  great  western  metropolis  shows 
how  fully  he  has  measured  up  to  both  subjective  and  objective  po- 
tentials. He  is  president  and  treasurer  of  the  corporation  of  Rob- 
erts &  Oake,  which  has  built  up  a  large  and  substantial  business  in 
the  packing  and  provision  trade  and  which  he  represents  as  one 
of  the  distinctively  popular  members  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  Mr. 
Roberts  was  born  on  the  14th  of  June,  1866,  in  Kilkee,  County  Clare 
(a  summer  watering  place),  and  was  brought  up  and  educated  in 
the  city  of  Limerick,  Ireland,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Elizabeth 
(Breen)  Roberts.  He  was  favored  in  having  been  reared  under  most 
benignant  home  surroundings,  and  also  made  good  use  of  the  ad- 
vantages aflforded  in  the  schools  of  his  native  city.  His  boyish  am- 
bition led  him  to  the  contemplation  of  an  active  and  independent 
career  in  connection  with  business,  and  it  was  but  in  natural  se- 
quence that  one  of  his  temperament  and  aspirations  should  be  drawn 
toward  America, — the  land  of  unlimited  opportunities  and  one  in 
whose  development  and  progress  so  many  of  his  own  blood  and 
nationality  had  materially  aided,  besides  winning  for  themselves  a 
degree  of  liberty  and  a  measure  of  success  beyond  the  limit  of 
achievement  in  the  Old  World.  When  but  fifteen  years  of  age  Mr. 
Roberts  courageously  severed  the  ties  that  bound  him  to  home 
and  native  land  and  set  forth  on  what  was  destined  to  be  a  noble  and 
successful  adventure.  He  came  to  America,  confident  of  his  ability 
to  win  for  himself  an  honorable  success,  and  he  arrived  in  Chicago 


i^ 


i\  i 


mjs^mi 


OF  THE  CITY  OF  CHICAGO  275 

in  November,  1881.  Here  he  sought  and  obtained  employment  with 
the  packing  and  provision  house  of  Henry  Denny  &  Sons.  The 
head  of  this  firm  had  known  the  Roberts  family  in  Ireland  and 
cheerfully  gave  to  young  Roberts  an  opportunity  to  demonstrate 
his  ability  and  show  the  true  caliber  that  was  his.  He  began  his 
service  in  the  modest  position  of  invoice  clerk,  and  by  his  fidelity 
to  the  interests  of  his  employers  he  soon  won  advancement,  with 
eventual  assumption  of  duties  of  a  close  and  confidential  nature. 
In  1884  Mr.  Roberts  accepted  a  position  with  the  International 
Packing  &  Provision  Company,  by  which  corporation  he  was  given 
charge  of  its  market  department.  Here  again  his  industry,  fidelity 
and  ability  won  him  successive  promotions,  and  he  held  in  turn 
the  positions  of  paymaster,  cashier  and  general  office  manager,  as- 
sistant secretary,  assistant  treasurer  and,  finally,  general  super- 
intendent. In  each  stage  of  his  experience  Mr.  Roberts  had  made 
the  acquired  knowledge  count  for  personal  capacity,  heavier  re- 
sponsibilities, and  finally  his  broad  practical  knowledge  led  him 
into  an  independent  venture  in  the  same  line  of  industrial  and  com- 
mercial enterprise.  His  self-confidence  and  his  initiative  and  admin- 
istrative ability  have  met  every  test  and  proved  the  quality  and  sure- 
ness  of  his  judgment.  In  March,  1895,  shortly  before  he  had  at- 
tained to  the  age  of  thirty  years,  Mr.  Roberts  organized  the  firm 
of  Roberts  &  Oake,  in  which  his  valued  coadjutor  was  Richard  W. 
Oake.  This  marked  the  turning  point  in  his  advancement  to  the 
goal  of  substantial  success  and  definite  prestige  in  his  chosen  field 
of  enterprise,  and  from  a  comparatively  modest  inception  has  been 
evolved  a  iDusiness  involving  extensive  operations  and  wide  ramifi- 
cations. In  September,  1900,  the  business  was  incorporated  under 
the  original  title,  and  from  that  time  to  the  present  Mr.  Roberts 
has  been  president,  treasurer  and  general  manager  of  the  extensive 
business  to  the  upbuilding  of  which  he  has  given  the  best  of  his 
splendid  ability  and  energies.  In  1901  he  became  also  an  executive 
of  the  firm  of  Miller  &  Hart,  and  of  this  corporation  he  was  vice- 
president  and  a  director  until  1916,  when  he  resigned  his  official 
post,  though  he  still  retains  his  financial  interest  in  the  business. 
The  genial,  buoyant  and  generous  nature  of  Mr.  Roberts  has  won 
to  him  a  host  of  friends  in  both  the  business  and  social  circles  of 
his  adopted  city,  and  as  a  citizen  he  is  loyal,  liberal  and  public- 
spirited.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  Progressive  party, 
in  the  Masonic  fraternity  his  maximum  York  Rite  affiliation  is  with 
Montjoie  Commandery  of  Knights  Templars,  besides  which  he  has 
received  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish 
Rite  and  also  holds  affiliation  with  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Chicago  Athletic  Association,  the  South  Shore  Coun- 
try Club,  and  the  Lake  Zurich  Golf  Club.  In  1892  Mr.  Roberts 
wedded  Miss  Carrie  A.  Conrad,  of  Louisville,  Kentucky,  and  the  two 
children  of  this  union  are  Marie,  who  was  born  April  23,  1894,  and 


276  HISTORY  OF  THE  BOARD  OF  TRADE 

who  is  now  the  wife  of  James  G.  Hodgkinson ;  and  John  Oake  Rob- 
erts, who  was  born  April  12,  1897.  The  second  marriage  of  Mr. 
Roberts  was  solemnized  February  2,  1907,  when  Mary  S.  Allen,  of 
Chicago,  became  his  wife.  The  one  child  of  this  marriage  was 
Charles  R.  R.,  who  was  born  October  28,  1911,  and  died  March 
23,  1917. 

Hugh  L.  Rodger. — On  the  5th  of  September,  1911,  Mr.  Rodger 
established  himself  in  independent  business  as  a  commission  broker 
in  grain,  provisions,  stocks  and  cotton,  with  headquarters  in  the 
city  of  Joliet,  the  metropolis  and  judicial  center  of  Will  county, 
Illinois,  and  the  same  year  recorded  his  name  on  the  roll  of  active 
members  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the  City  of  Chicago.  The  un- 
equivocal success  which  he  has  achieved  in  the  upbuilding  of  a 
substantial  business  at  Joliet  has  not  been  an  accident  but  a  logical 
result,  for  he  had  previously  gained  broad  and  varied  experience 
through  his  connection  with  the  representative  Chicago  commis- 
sion house  of  the  Bartlett-Frazier  Company,  one  of  the  more  im- 
portant concerns  identified  with  the  activities  of  the  Board  of  Trade. 
His  association  with  this  company  had  its  inception  in  1905,  when 
he  was  a  lad  of  sixteen  years,  and  continued  until  September,  1910. 
In  the  autumn  of  the  following  year  he  established  his  present  brok- 
erage business  and  in  connection  therewith  he  has  made  a  record  as 
a  young  man  of  marked  energy,  progressiveness  and  discrimination, 
the  definite  result  of  his  activities  being  shown  in  his  control  of  an 
enterprise  which  is  one  of  the  staunchest  of  the  kind  in  northeastern 
Illinois.  Mr.  Rodger  is  fortunate  in  having  as  his  Chicago  cor- 
respondents the  well-known  brokerage  firm  of  Lamson  Brothers  & 
Company,  and  his  well  appointed  offices  are  in  the  Joliet  National 
Bank  Building.  He  was  born  in  Chicago,  on  the  12th  of  January, 
1889,  one  of  the  nine  children  of  John  and  Bertha  (Lidell)  Rodger, 
the  father  having  been  for  many  years  actively  identified  with  rail- 
road operations  and  having  thus  continued  until  his  death,  which 
occurred  December  7,  1915,  his  widow  still  maintaining  her  home 
at  Joliet.  Hugh  L.  Rodger  gained  his  early  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  Chicago  and  supplemented  this  by  attending  the  public 
schools  of  Joliet,  to  which  city  the  family  moved.  Virtually  his  en- 
tire business  experience  has  been  along  the  line  of  enterprise  with 
which  he  is  now  prominently  identified  and  in  connection  with  which 
he  has  gained  a  reputation  that  in  itself  constitutes  a  valuable  com- 
mercial asset.  In  politics  Mr.  Rodger  is  a  supporter  of  the  Repub- 
lican party.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Benevolent  &  Protective  Order 
of  Elks,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Baptist  church.  His 
wife  was  Miss  Jennie  Haggert,  daughter  of  John  Haggert,  one  of 
the  representative  citizens  of  Joliet. 

James  C.  Rogers. — The  spring  of  the  year  1916  mar